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1.
Journal of Maternal-Fetal and Neonatal Medicine ; 34(SUPPL 1):44, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1517730

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION When COVID-19 first spread in Europe, it was unclear if the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) could be transmitted from mother to fetus. Hence, doubts arose as the best way to deliver considering that caesarean delivery (CD) indeed could prevent vertical transmission. METHODS We calculated CD rate in 5 Italian regions (Lombardy, Emilia-Romagna, Tuscany, Umbria, Sardinia) differently affected by the first wave of the pandemic. Data were retrospectively obtained from each birth center and aggregated by areas (provinces). Data related to March-April 2020, corresponding to first COVID-19 peak in Italy, were compared with the March-April 2019 as well with November-December 2019, and odds ratio (ORs) were calculated. RESULTS A total of 24 provinces were included, covering 21.8% of the Italian population. Overall CD rate did not differ in the three examined periods: neither in the comparison of March-April 2019 (reference period) versus November-December 2019 (OR: 0.98 95% CI 0.93-1.05) nor in the comparison of the reference period versus March-April 2020 (OR: 1.03;95 % CI 0.98-1.09). CD rate did not change even in areas with the highest incidence of COVID-19. Only 17 out of 3.257 CDs was due to direct COVID-19 complications (0.5%;95% CI 0.3-0.8). No pregnant women with COVID-19 proven infection died. CONCLUSIONS The first wave of COVID-19 pandemic did not significantly affect delivery mode in Italy, even in areas with the highest infection rates.

2.
Minerva Ginecologica ; 73(1):121-124, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1151076

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 was declared to be a pandemic due to the rapid increase of cases around the world, including the number of pregnant women. Data about vertical transmission of COVID-19 are still limited and controversial: in most cases, although a positive mother, the virus could not be isolated in amniotic fluid, cord blood, breast milk or neonatal throat swab in these patients. No data have been published about possible intrauterine sonographic signs of infection. A pregnant woman was diagnosed with SARS-CoV-2 at 35 t5 weeks of gestation and managed conservatively at home. At transabdominal ultrasound at 38+3 weeks, fetal bowel and gallbladder calcifications were noted. CMV and other infectious agents were ruled out an iterative caesarean section was performed at 38+5 weeks without complications. Placenta resulted negative for SARS-CoV-2;the umbilical cord blood sample was IgG positive and IgM negative as per maternal infection. The baby developed respiratory distress syndrome requiring endotracheal surfactant administration and nasal-CPAP for one day but nasopharyngeal swabs at birth and after 48 hours were SARS-CoV-2 negative. Neonatal abdominal ultrasound showed normal liver, acalculous gallbladder with mild parietal thickening. The baby was discharged in good conditions. Although gallbladder calcifications and echogenic bowel are highly suspicious of viral infection and were thought to be due to the vertical transmission of SARS-CoV-2, these findings were not corroborated by the results of our diagnostic tests;these sonographic findings might represent a false positive of fetal infection in mother affected by COVID-19 since vertical transmission appears to be rare.

3.
Minerva Ginecologica ; 30:30, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-948767

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: COVID-19 was declared pandemic due to the rapid increase of cases around the world, including the number of pregnant women. Data about vertical transmission of Covid-19 are still limited and controversial: in most cases, although a positive mother, the virus could not be isolated in amniotic fluid, cord blood, breast milk or neonatal throat swab in these patients. No data have been published about possible intrauterine sonographic signs of infection. CASE PRESENTATION: A pregnant woman was diagnosed with SARS-CoV2 at 35+5 weeks of gestation and managed conservatively at home. At transabdominal ultrasound at 38+3 weeks, fetal bowel and gallbladder calcifications were noted. CMV and other infectious agents were ruled out;an iterative Caesarean Section was performed at 38+5 weeks without complications. Placenta resulted negative for SARS-CoV-2;the umbilical cord blood sample was IgG positive and IgM negative as per maternal infection. The baby developed respiratory distress syndrome requiring endotracheal surfactant administration and nasal-CPAP for one day but nasopharyngeal swabs at birth and after 48 hours were SARS-Cov2 negative. Neonatal abdominal ultrasound showed normal liver, acalculous gallbladder with mild parietal thickening. The baby was discharged in good conditions. CONCLUSIONS: although gallbladder calcifications and echogenic bowel are highly suspicious of viral infection and were thought to be due to the vertical transmission of SARS-CoV-2, these findings were not corroborated by the results of our diagnostic tests;these sonographic findings might represent a false positive of fetal infection in mother affected by COVID-19 since vertical transmission appears to be rare.

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