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1.
Annals of Behavioral Medicine ; 56(SUPP 1):S492-S492, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1849290
2.
Journal of Clinical Oncology ; 39(15):3, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1538119
3.
PLoS One ; 16(10): e0258213, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1450733

ABSTRACT

Our objective was to describe how residents of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, coped psychologically with the first wave of COVID-19 pandemic. In a cross-sectional design, we aimed to estimate the rates and correlates of anxiety and depression, examine how specific worries correlated with general anxiety and depression, and synthesize themes of "the most difficult experiences" shared by the respondents. We collected data through an on-line survey in a convenience sample of 1,293 adult residents of Philadelphia, PA between April 17 and July 3, 2020, inquiring about symptoms of anxiety and depression (via the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale), specific worries, open-ended narratives of "the most difficult experiences" (coded into themes), demographics, perceived sources of support, and general health. Anxiety was evident among 30 to 40% of participants and depression-about 10%. Factor analysis revealed two distinct, yet inter-related clusters of specific worries related to mood disorders: concern about "hardships" and "fear of infection". Regression analyses revealed that anxiety, depression, and fear of infection, but not concern about hardships, worsened over the course of the epidemic. "The most difficult experiences" characterized by loss of income, poor health of self or others, uncertainty, death of a relative or a friend, and struggle accessing food were each associated with some of the measures of worries and mood disorders. Respondents who believed they could rely on support of close personal network fared better psychologically than those who reported relying primarily on government and social services organizations. Thematic analysis revealed complex perceptions of the pandemic by the participants, giving clues to both positive and negative experiences that may have affected how they coped. Despite concerns about external validity, our observations are concordant with emerging evidence of psychological toll of the COVID-19 pandemic and measures employed to mitigate risk of infection.


Subject(s)
Adaptation, Psychological , COVID-19/epidemiology , Mood Disorders/diagnosis , Adult , Anxiety/pathology , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/pathology , Female , Humans , Internet , Male , Middle Aged , Mood Disorders/psychology , Pandemics , Philadelphia/epidemiology , Regression Analysis , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Surveys and Questionnaires
4.
PLoS ONE ; 16(2), 2021.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1410720

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic has impacted the economy, livelihood, and physical and mental well-being of people worldwide. This study aimed to compare the mental health status during the pandemic in the general population of seven middle income countries (MICs) in Asia (China, Iran, Malaysia, Pakistan, Philippines, Thailand, and Vietnam). All the countries used the Impact of Event Scale-Revised (IES-R) and Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS-21) to measure mental health. There were 4479 Asians completed the questionnaire with demographic characteristics, physical symptoms and health service utilization, contact history, knowledge and concern, precautionary measure, and rated their mental health with the IES-R and DASS-21. Descriptive statistics, One-Way analysis of variance (ANOVA), and linear regression were used to identify protective and risk factors associated with mental health parameters. There were significant differences in IES-R and DASS-21 scores between 7 MICs (p<0.05). Thailand had all the highest scores of IES-R, DASS-21 stress, anxiety, and depression scores whereas Vietnam had all the lowest scores. The risk factors for adverse mental health during the COVID-19 pandemic include age <30 years, high education background, single and separated status, discrimination by other countries and contact with people with COVID-19 (p<0.05). The protective factors for mental health include male gender, staying with children or more than 6 people in the same household, employment, confidence in doctors, high perceived likelihood of survival, and spending less time on health information (p<0.05). This comparative study among 7 MICs enhanced the understanding of metal health in the general population during the COVID-19 pandemic.

5.
Frontiers in Communication ; 6:22, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1379960

ABSTRACT

Saliou (Eur J Epidemiol, 1994, 10 (4), 515-517) argued that pandemics are special kinds of crises and requires the public health sector to focus on: 1) reducing uncertainty, 2) rumor mitigation, and 3) ensuring the public reduces their risk of contracting the disease. With this as a backdrop, the central aim of this research is to better understand the connections between public information seeking, evaluation, and self-protective behaviors in the COVID-19 pandemic and focuses on a comparison between the Republic of Korea and Vietnam to provide insights into the influence of the individual, institutional, and information factors influencing people's experience with COVID-19. Thus, there are two major contributions of this study. First, it provides a cross-theory evaluation of the factors that contribute to information seeking, evaluation, and self-protective behaviors. Second, the study identifies potentially critical differences in information seeking, evaluation, and self-protective behaviors based on acute disease reproduction in countries with a successful pandemic suppression history. Findings suggest that in countries where there are high levels of trust and satisfaction even small changes in the infection rates lead to different information seeking and self-protective behaviors.

6.
10th International Conference on Software and Computer Applications, ICSCA 2021 ; : 22-31, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1362011

ABSTRACT

Potentialized by Natural Language Processing (NLP) technology, we can build a chatbot or an AI Agent to automatically address the need to automatically get credible and timely information, especially in the fight against epidemics. However, Vietnamese understanding is still a big challenge for NLP. This paper introduces an AI Agent using the Attention algorithm and Albert model to implement the question/answering task in the Covid-19 field for the Vietnamese language. In the end, we also built two other modules, one for Vietnamese diacritic auto-correction and another for updating Covid-19 statistics (using RASA framework), to deploy a Covid-19 chatbot application on mobile devices. © 2021 ACM.

7.
Preprint in English | medRxiv | ID: ppmedrxiv-21261849

ABSTRACT

In comparison to the general patient population, trauma patients show higher level detections of bloodborne infectious diseases, such as Hepatitis and Human Immunodeficiency Virus. In comparison to bloodborne pathogens, the prevalence of respiratory infections such as SARS-CoV-2 and how that relates with other variables, such as drug usage and trauma type, is currently unknown in trauma populations. Here, we evaluated SARS-CoV-2 seropositivity and antibody isotype profile in 2,542 trauma patients from six Level-1 trauma centers between April and October of 2020 during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic. We found that the seroprevalence in trauma victims 18-44 years old (9.79%, 95% confidence interval/CI: 8.33 11.47) was much higher in comparison to older patients (45-69 years old: 6.03%, 4.59-5.88; 70+ years old: 4.33%, 2.54 - 7.20). Black/African American (9.54%, 7.77 - 11.65) and Hispanic/Latino patients (14.95%, 11.80 - 18.75) also had higher seroprevalence in comparison, respectively, to White (5.72%, 4.62 7.05) and Non-Latino patients (6.55%, 5.57 - 7.69). More than half (55.54%) of those tested for drug toxicology had at least one drug present in their system. Those that tested positive for narcotics or sedatives had a significant negative correlation with seropositivity, while those on anti-depressants trended positive. These findings represent an important consideration for both the patients and first responders that treat trauma patients facing potential risk of respiratory infectious diseases like SARS-CoV-2.

8.
Clin Neuropsychol ; 36(1): 72-84, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1242081

ABSTRACT

ObjectiveNeuropsychological assessment is integral to the pre-surgical deep brain stimulation (DBS) workup for patients with movement disorders. The COVID-19 pandemic quickly affected care access and shifted healthcare delivery, and neuropsychology has adapted successfully to provide tele-neuropsychological (teleNP) DBS evaluations during this time, thus permanently changing the landscape of neuropsychological practice. Method: In this paper, we discuss the lessons learned from the pandemic and we offer care management guidelines for teleNP and in-person evaluations of pre-DBS populations, with exploration of the feasibility of the different approaches for uninterrupted care access. Results: We summarize the strengths and weaknesses of these care models and we provide future directions for the state of clinical neuropsychological practice for DBS programs, with implications for broader patient populations. Conclusions: A better understanding of these dynamics will inform and educate the DBS team and community regarding the complexities of performing DBS neuropsychological evaluations during COVID-19 and beyond.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Deep Brain Stimulation , Telemedicine , Humans , Neuropsychological Tests , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
9.
Parkinsonism Relat Disord ; 86: 135-138, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1230072

ABSTRACT

The evaluation and management of patients with movement disorders has evolved considerably due to the COVID-19 pandemic, including the assessment of candidates for deep brain stimulation (DBS) therapy. Members of the Neuropsychology Focus Group from the Parkinson Study Group Functional Neurosurgical Working Group met virtually to discuss current practices and solutions, build consensus, and to inform the DBS team and community regarding the complexities of performing DBS neuropsychological evaluations during COVID-19. It is our viewpoint that the practice of neuropsychology has adapted successfully to provide tele-neuropsychological pre-DBS evaluations during the global pandemic, thus permanently changing the landscape of neuropsychological services.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Deep Brain Stimulation/trends , Movement Disorders/psychology , Movement Disorders/surgery , Neuropsychological Tests , Neuropsychology/trends , Neurosurgery/trends , Pandemics , Parkinson Disease/psychology , Parkinson Disease/surgery , Deep Brain Stimulation/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Telemedicine
10.
Annals of the Academy of Medicine, Singapore ; 50(3):198-199, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1184219
11.
BMJ Innovations ; 7:S19-S22, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1175162
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