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1.
Antic, Darko, Milic, Natasa, Chatzikonstantinou, Thomas, Scarfò, Lydia, Otasevic, Vladimir, Rajovic, Nina, Allsup, David, Cabrero, Alejandro Alonso, Andres, Martin, Gonzales, Monica Baile, Capasso, Antonella, Collado, Rosa, Cordoba, Raul, Cuéllar-García, Carolina, Correa, Juan Gonzalo, De Paoli, Lorenzo, De Paolis, Maria Rosaria, Poeta, Giovanni Del, Dimou, Maria, Doubek, Michael, Efstathopoulou, Maria, El-Ashwah, Shaimaa, Enrico, Alicia, Espinet, Blanca, Farina, Lucia, Ferrari, Angela, Foglietta, Myriam, Lopez-Garcia, Alberto, García-Marco, José, García-Serra, Rocío, Gentile, Massimo, Gimeno, Eva, Silva, Maria Gomes, Gutwein, Odit, Hakobyan, Yervand, Herishanu, Yair, Hernández-Rivas, José Ángel, Herold, Tobias, Itchaki, Gilad, Jaksic, Ozren, Janssens, Ann, Kalashnikova, Оlga, Kalicińska, Elżbieta, Kater, Arnon, Kersting, Sabina, Koren-Michowitz, Maya, Gomez, Jorge Labrador, Lad, Deepesh, Laurenti, Luca, Fresa, Alberto, Levin, Mark-David, Bastida, Carlota Mayor, Malerba, Lara, Marasca, Roberto, Marchetti, Monia, Marquet, Juan, Mihaljevic, Biljana, Milosevic, Ivana, Mirás, Fatima, Morawska, Marta, Motta, Marina, Munir, Talha, Murru, Roberta, Nunes, Raquel, Olivieri, Jacopo, Pavlovsky, Miguel Arturo, Piskunova, Inga, Popov, Viola Maria, Quaglia, Francesca Maria, Quaresmini, Giulia, Reda, Gianluigi, Rigolin, Gian Matteo, Shrestha, Amit, Šimkovič, Martin, Smirnova, Svetlana, Špaček, Martin, Sportoletti, Paolo, Stanca, Oana, Stavroyianni, Niki, Raa, Doreen Te, Tomic, Kristina, Tonino, Sanne, Trentin, Livio, Spek, Ellen Der, Gelder, Michel, Varettoni, Marzia, Visentin, Andrea, Vitale, Candida, Vukovic, Vojin, Wasik-Szczepanek, Ewa, Wróbel, Tomasz, Segundo, Lucrecia Yáñez San, Yassin, Mohamed, Coscia, Marta, Rambaldi, Alessandro, Montserrat, Emili, Foà, Robin, Cuneo, Antonio, Carrier, Marc, Ghia, Paolo, Stamatopoulos, Kostas.
EuropePMC; 2022.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-334383

ABSTRACT

Background: Patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) may be more susceptible to COVID-19 related poor outcomes, including thrombosis and death, due to the advanced age, the presence of comorbidities, and the disease and treatment-related immune deficiency. In this retrospective multicenter study, conducted by ERIC, the European Research Initiative on CLL, we assessed the risk of thrombosis and bleeding in patients with CLL affected by severe COVID-19. Methods: : The study included patients from 79 centers across 22 countries. Data collection was conducted between April and May 2021. Results: : A total of 793 patients from 79 centers were included in the study with 593 being hospitalized (74.8%). Among these, 518 were defined as having severe COVID: 162 were admitted to the ICU while 356 received oxygen supplementation outside the ICU. Most patients (90%) were receiving thromboprophylaxis. During COVID-19 treatment, 8.8% developed a thromboembolic event, while 4.8% experienced bleeding. Thrombosis developed in 20.5% of patients who were not receiving thromboprophylaxis, but only in 8.1% of patients who were on thromboprophylaxis. Bleeding episodes were more frequent in patients receiving intermediate/therapeutic versus prophylactic doses of low-molecular-weight heparin (LWMH) (11.1% vs. 4.2%, respectively) and in elderly. In multivariate analysis, peak D-dimer level was a poor prognostic factor for thrombosis occurrence (OR=1.020, 95%CI 1.006‒1.033), while thromboprophylaxis use was protective (OR=0.194, 95%CI 0.061‒0.614). Age and LMWH intermediate/therapeutic dose administration were prognostic factors in multivariate model for bleeding (OR=1.055, 95%CI 1.013-1.103 and OR=2.490, 95%CI 1.044-5.935, respectively). Conclusions: : Patients with CLL affected by severe COVID-19 are at a high risk of thrombosis if thromboprophylaxis is not used, but also at increased risk of bleeding under the LMWH intermediate/therapeutic dose administration.

2.
Blood Adv ; 6(1): 327-338, 2022 01 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1622201

ABSTRACT

Lymphoma represents a heterogeneous hematological malignancy (HM), which is characterized by severe immunosuppression. Patients diagnosed of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) during the course of HM have been described to have poor outcome, with only few reports specifically addressing lymphoma patients. Here, we investigated the clinical behavior and clinical parameters of a large multicenter cohort of adult patients with different lymphoma subtypes, with the aim of identifying predictors of death. The study included 856 patients, of whom 619 were enrolled prospectively in a 1-year frame and were followed-up for a median of 66 days (range 1-395). Patients were managed as outpatient (not-admitted cohort, n = 388) or required hospitalization (n = 468), and median age was 63 years (range 19-94). Overall, the 30- and 100-days mortality was 13% (95% confidence interval (CI), 11% to 15%) and 23% (95% CI, 20% to 27%), respectively. Antilymphoma treatment, including anti-CD20 containing regimens, did not impact survival. Patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma had the more favorable survival, but this was partly related to significantly younger age. The time interval between lymphoma diagnosis and COVID-19 was inversely related to mortality. Multivariable analysis recognized 4 easy-to-use factors (age, gender, lymphocyte, and platelet count) that were associated with risk of death, both in the admitted and in the not-admitted cohort (HR 3.79 and 8.85 for the intermediate- and high-risk group, respectively). Overall, our study shows that patients should not be deprived of the best available treatment of their underlying disease and indicates which patients are at higher risk of death. This study was registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT04352556.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Lymphoma , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Cohort Studies , Humans , Lymphoma/diagnosis , Lymphoma/therapy , Middle Aged , Prognosis , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
3.
Applied Sciences ; 12(2):564, 2022.
Article in English | MDPI | ID: covidwho-1613592

ABSTRACT

Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is a rare but life-threatening disease that can occur either as a primary condition or as a consequence of a variety of triggers, including infectious diseases. Here we present a case of secondary HLH triggered by systemic Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in a 59-year-old immunocompromised Hairy Cell Leukemia and previous SARS-CoV2 infected patient. This case report underlines the role of Etoposide-based chemotherapy in treating the severe inflammation that is the defining factor of HLH, suggesting how, even when such therapy is not effective, it may still give the clinicians time to identify the underlying condition and start the appropriate targeted therapy. Moreover, it gives insight on our decision to treat the underlying haematological condition with a BRAF-targeted therapy rather than purine analog-based chemotherapy to reduce the risk of future severe infections.

4.
Cancers (Basel) ; 13(21)2021 Oct 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1512126

ABSTRACT

The Btk inhibitor ibrutinib has significantly changed the management of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients. Despite its clinical efficacy, relapses occur, and outcomes after ibrutinib failure are poor. Although BTK and PLCγ2 mutations have been found to be associated with ibrutinib resistance in a fair percentage of CLL patients, no information on resistance mechanisms is available in patients lacking these mutations. The heat shock protein of 70 kDa (HSP70) and its transcription factor heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) play a role in mediating the survival and progression of CLL, as well as taking part in drug resistance in various cancers. We demonstrated that resveratrol and related phenols were able to induce apoptosis in vitro in leukemic cells from CLL untreated patients by acting on the HSP70/HSF1 axis. The same was achieved in cells recovered from 13 CLL patients failing in vivo ibrutinib treatment. HSP70 and HSF1 levels decreased following in vitro treatment, correlating to apoptosis induction. We suggest an involvement of HSP70/HSF1 axis in controlling resistance to ibrutinib in CLL cells, since their inhibition is effective in inducing in vitro apoptosis in cells from ibrutinib refractory patients. The targeting of HSP70/HSF1 axis could represent a novel rational therapeutic strategy for CLL, also for relapsing patients.

5.
Roeker, Lindsey E.; Scarfo, Lydia, Chatzikonstantinou, Thomas, Abrisqueta, Pau, Eyre, Toby A.; Cordoba, Raul, Muntañola Prat, Ana, Villacampa, Guillermo, Leslie, Lori A.; Koropsak, Michael, Quaresmini, Giulia, Allan, John N.; Furman, Richard R.; Bhavsar, Erica B.; Pagel, John M.; Hernandez-Rivas, Jose Angel, Patel, Krish, Motta, Marina, Bailey, Neil, Miras, Fatima, Lamanna, Nicole, Alonso, Rosalia, Osorio-Prendes, Santiago, Vitale, Candida, Kamdar, Manali, Baltasar, Patricia, Österborg, Anders, Hanson, Lotta, Baile, Mónica, Rodríguez-Hernández, Ines, Valenciano, Susana, Popov, Viola Maria, Barez Garcia, Abelardo, Alfayate, Ana, Oliveira, Ana C.; Eichhorst, Barbara, Quaglia, Francesca M.; Reda, Gianluigi, Lopez Jimenez, Javier, Varettoni, Marzia, Marchetti, Monia, Romero, Pilar, Riaza Grau, Rosalía, Munir, Talha, Zabalza, Amaya, Janssens, Ann, Niemann, Carsten U.; Perini, Guilherme Fleury, Delgado, Julio, Yanez San Segundo, Lucrecia, Gómez Roncero, Ma Isabel, Wilson, Matthew, Patten, Piers, Marasca, Roberto, Iyengar, Sunil, Seddon, Amanda, Torres, Ana, Ferrari, Angela, Cuéllar-García, Carolina, Wojenski, Daniel, El-Sharkawi, Dima, Itchaki, Gilad, Parry, Helen, Mateos-Mazón, Juan José, Martinez-Calle, Nicolas, Ma, Shuo, Naya, Daniel, Van Der Spek, Ellen, Seymour, Erlene K.; Gimeno Vázquez, Eva, Rigolin, Gian Matteo, Mauro, Francesca Romana, Walter, Harriet S.; Labrador, Jorge, De Paoli, Lorenzo, Laurenti, Luca, Ruiz, Elena, Levin, Mark-David, Šimkovič, Martin, Špaček, Martin, Andreu, Rafa, Walewska, Renata, Perez-Gonzalez, Sonia, Sundaram, Suchitra, Wiestner, Adrian, Cuesta, Amalia, Broom, Angus, Kater, Arnon P.; Muiña, Begoña, Velasquez, César A.; Ujjani, Chaitra S.; Seri, Cristina, Antic, Darko, Bron, Dominique, Vandenberghe, Elisabeth, Chong, Elise A.; Lista, Enrico, García, Fiz Campoy, Del Poeta, Giovanni, Ahn, Inhye, Pu, Jeffrey J.; Brown, Jennifer R.; Soler Campos, Juan Alfonso, Malerba, Lara, Trentin, Livio, Orsucci, Lorella, Farina, Lucia, Villalon, Lucia, Vidal, Maria Jesus, Sanchez, Maria Jose, Terol, Maria Jose, De Paolis, Maria Rosaria, Gentile, Massimo, Davids, Matthew S.; Shadman, Mazyar, Yassin, Mohamed A.; Foglietta, Myriam, Jaksic, Ozren, Sportoletti, Paolo, Barr, Paul M.; Ramos, Rafael, Santiago, Raquel, Ruchlemer, Rosa, Kersting, Sabina, Huntington, Scott F.; Herold, Tobias, Herishanu, Yair, Thompson, Meghan C.; Lebowitz, Sonia, Ryan, Christine, Jacobs, Ryan W.; Portell, Craig A.; Isaac, Krista, Rambaldi, Alessandro, Nabhan, Chadi, Brander, Danielle M.; Montserrat, Emili, Rossi, Giuseppe, Garcia-Marco, Jose A.; Coscia, Marta, Malakhov, Nikita, Fernandez-Escalada, Noemi, Skånland, Sigrid Strand, Coombs, Callie C.; Ghione, Paola, Schuster, Stephen J.; Foà, Robin, Cuneo, Antonio, Bosch, Francesc, Stamatopoulos, Kostas, Ghia, Paolo, Mato, Anthony R.; Patel, Meera.
Blood ; 136(Supplement 1):45-49, 2020.
Article in English | PMC | ID: covidwho-1338959

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Patients (pts) with CLL may be at particular risk of severe COVID-19 given advanced age and immune dysregulation. Two large series with limited follow-up have reported outcomes for pts with CLL and COVID-19 (Scarfò, et al. Leukemia 2020;Mato, et al. Blood 2020). To provide maximal clarity on outcomes for pts with CLL and COVID-19, we partnered in a worldwide effort to describe the clinical experience and validate predictors of survival, including potential treatment effects.Methods: This international collaboration represents a partnership between investigators at 141 centers. Data are presented in two cohorts. Cohort 1 (Co1) includes pts captured through efforts by European Research Initiative on CLL (ERIC), Italian CAMPUS CLL Program, and Grupo Español de Leucemia Linfática Crónica. The validation cohort, Cohort 2 (Co2), includes pts from US (66%), UK (23%), EU (7%), and other countries (4%). There is no overlap in cases between cohorts.CLL pts were included if COVID-19 was diagnosed by PCR detection of SARS-CoV-2 and they required inpatient hospitalization. Data were collected retrospectively 2/2020 - 5/2020 using standardized case report forms. Baseline characteristics, preexisting comorbidities (including cumulative illness rating scale (CIRS) score ≥6 vs. <6), CLL treatment history, details regarding COVID-19 course, management, and therapy, and vital status were collected.The primary endpoint of this study was to estimate the case fatality rate (CFR), defined as the proportion of pts who died among all pts hospitalized with COVID-19. Chi-squared test was used to compare frequencies;univariable and multivariable analyses utilized Cox regression. Predictors of inferior OS in both Co1 and Co2 were included in multivariable analyses. Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate overall survival (OS) from time of COVID-19 diagnosis (dx).Results: 411 hospitalized, COVID-19 positive CLL pts were analyzed (Co1 n=281, Co2 n=130). Table 1 describes baseline characteristics. At COVID-19 dx, median age was 72 in Co1 (range 37-94) and 68 in Co2 (range 41-98);31% (Co1) and 45% (Co2) had CIRS ≥6. In Co1, 48% were treatment-naïve and 26% were receiving CLL-directed therapy at COVID-19 dx (66% BTKi ± anti-CD20, 19% Venetoclax ± anti-CD20, 9.6% chemo/chemoimmunotherapy (CIT), 1.4% PI3Ki, 4% other). In Co2, 36% were never treated and 49% were receiving CLL-directed therapy (65% BTKi ± anti-CD20, 19% Venetoclax ± anti-CD20, 9.4% multi-novel agent combinations, 1.6% CIT, 1.6% PI3Ki, 1.6% anti-CD20 monotherapy, 1.6% other). Most pts receiving CLL-directed therapy had it held at COVID-19 diagnosis (93% in Co1 and 81% in Co2).Frequency of most COVID-19 symptoms/laboratory abnormalities were similar in the two cohorts including fever (88% in both), lymphocytosis (ALC ≥30 x 109/L;27% vs. 21%), and lymphocytopenia (ALC <1.0 x 109/L;18% vs. 28%), while others varied between Co1 and Co2 (p<0.0001), including cough (61% vs. 93%), dyspnea (60% vs. 84%), fatigue (13% vs. 77%).Median follow-up was 24 days (range 2-86) in Co1 and 17 days (1-43) in Co2. CFRs were similar in Co1 and Co2, 30% and 34% (p=0.45). 54% and 43% were discharged while 16% and 23% remained admitted at last follow-up in Co1 and Co2, respectively. The proportion of pts requiring supplemental oxygen was similar (89% vs. 92%) while rate of ICU admission was higher in Co2 (20% vs. 48%, p<0.0001). Figure 1 depicts OS in each cohort. Univariable analyses demonstrated that age and CIRS ≥6 significantly predicted inferior OS in both cohorts, while only age remained an independent predictor of inferior OS in multivariable analyses (Table 2). Prior treatment for CLL (vs. observation) predicted inferior OS in Co1 but not Co2.Conclusions : In the largest cancer dx-specific cohort reported, pts with CLL hospitalized for COVID-19 had a CFR of 30-34%. Advanced patient age at COVID-19 diagnosis was an independent predictor of OS in two large cohorts. This CFR will serve as a benchmark for mortality for future outcomes studies, including thera eutic interventions for COVID-19 in this population. The effect of CLL treatment on OS was inconsistent across cohorts;COVID-19 may be severe regardless of treatment status. While there were no significant differences in distribution of current lines of therapy between cohorts, prior chemo exposure was more common in Co1 vs. Co2, which may account for difference in OS. Extended follow-up will be presented.

7.
Leukemia ; 34(9): 2354-2363, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-638239

ABSTRACT

Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is a disease of the elderly, characterized by immunodeficiency. Hence, patients with CLL might be considered more susceptible to severe complications from COVID-19. We undertook this retrospective international multicenter study to characterize the course of COVID-19 in patients with CLL and identify potential predictors of outcome. Of 190 patients with CLL and confirmed COVID-19 diagnosed between 28/03/2020 and 22/05/2020, 151 (79%) presented with severe COVID-19 (need of oxygen and/or intensive care admission). Severe COVID-19 was associated with more advanced age (≥65 years) (odds ratio 3.72 [95% CI 1.79-7.71]). Only 60 patients (39.7%) with severe COVID-19 were receiving or had recent (≤12 months) treatment for CLL at the time of COVID-19 versus 30/39 (76.9%) patients with mild disease. Hospitalization rate for severe COVID-19 was lower (p < 0.05) for patients on ibrutinib versus those on other regimens or off treatment. Of 151 patients with severe disease, 55 (36.4%) succumbed versus only 1/38 (2.6%) with mild disease; age and comorbidities did not impact on mortality. In CLL, (1) COVID-19 severity increases with age; (2) antileukemic treatment (particularly BTK inhibitors) appears to exert a protective effect; (3) age and comorbidities did not impact on mortality, alluding to a relevant role of CLL and immunodeficiency.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Chronic, B-Cell/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Adenine/analogs & derivatives , Age Factors , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Antineoplastic Agents/pharmacology , Antineoplastic Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19 , Comorbidity , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Female , Humans , Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Chronic, B-Cell/drug therapy , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Piperidines , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Prognosis , Protein Kinase Inhibitors/pharmacology , Protein Kinase Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Pyrazoles/pharmacology , Pyrazoles/therapeutic use , Pyrimidines/pharmacology , Pyrimidines/therapeutic use , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Surveys and Questionnaires
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