Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 4 de 4
Filter
1.
Higher Education in Asia ; Part F3:101-122, 2023.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-20236940

ABSTRACT

During the pandemic, virtual Transnational higher education (TNHE) became one of the solutions to support researchers and students in continuing academic research collaborations, intercultural competence, and global awareness acquisition via a virtual platform. This case study explores the implementation of the MOST-NSF Partnership for International Research and Education (PIRE) research project between Taiwan and the USA in terms of governance modes and research productivity according to Knight's Functional, Organizational, a Political approaches (FOPA) model. The study finds that the political and functional models are somehow consistent with the national needs of scientific development. Second, the COVID-19 crisis intensified international collaboration and justified the supremacy of global sciences, which has overridden national and individual interests. The case study provides feasible management modes and research collaboration experiences for the researchers who would like to implement transnational higher education with other foreign partners in the post-pandemic era. © 2023, The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd.

2.
Supportive Care in Cancer ; 30:S25-S26, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1935806

ABSTRACT

Introduction According to Braun and Clarke, thematic analysis (TA) is a family of methods that entail familiarization with the data;generating initial codes;conceptualizing, reviewing, naming, and defining themes;and writing a report. We conducted a multicentric qualitative study investigating the experiences of individuals treated for cancer during the COVID-19 pandemic in different language regions and countries. We aim to describe our procedures for selecting an approach to TA;generating codes;and conceptualizing themes and sub themes capturing common and distinct experiences across sites. Methods Our team was comprised of multilingual investigators from Switzerland and the United States. We formed site-specific workgroups to recruit local participants and conduct interviews in one of five languages. Principal challenges were to (a) ensure consistency in qualitative data collection;(b) construct shared interpretations of qualitative data while preserving context-specific nuance;and (c) develop and maintain a large data set supporting iterative analyses by multiple workgroups. Results Adopting a pragmatic worldview, we planned and conducted a codebook TA. We validated data collection materials with each workgroup;developed a codebook;analyzed data deductively and inductively;and used MAX QDA software to facilitate data management. Table 1 details our approach. Conclusions Investigators using TA in disparate contexts face unique methodological challenges. Research to establish best practices is warranted.

3.
Journal of Clinical Oncology ; 39(15 SUPPL), 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1339197

ABSTRACT

Background: The rapid development of safe and effective vaccines against SARS-CoV-2 may stem the global COVID-19 pandemic. However, since individuals with cancer were under-represented during clinical vaccine trials, experience with COVID-19 vaccines among cancer patients is limited. Methods: An internet-based survey was conducted January 15 -February 10, 2021 among members of the Inspire online health community. The 63-item survey was emailed to members of the Inspire community who had opted-in for research. Results: Out of 19,152 respondents, 4895 (25%) self-reported a cancer diagnosis. Of these, 1337 (27%) were receiving active therapy. Cancer respondents were 66% female, 77% white, 44% college educated, with a median age range 55-65 years. 88% had solid tumors and 12% hematologic malignancies. 241 (5%) had prior COVID-19 and 148 (3%) thought they had had it but were not tested. Among cancer patients with COVID-19 approximately 30% reported ongoing late symptoms. At the time of survey, 1335 (27%) cancer patients had received a COVID-19 vaccine (Moderna 51% Pfizer-BioNTech 46%, Astra-Zeneca 3%, Other/unknown >1%). Following the first injection, 63% had local adverse events (AEs): injection site pain (51%), swelling (8%), redness (6%), and itching (4%). 34% reported systemic AEs including myalgia (32%), fatigue (18%), headache (12%), joint pain (5%), and chills (5%). 199 (15%) had received the second (booster) vaccination. 76% reported local AEs including pain (69%), swelling (14%), itching (8%), and redness (7%). 67% reported systemic AEs including fatigue (49%), myalgia (30%), headache (29%), chills (23%), fever (16%), joint pain (15%), and nausea (12%). AEs were comparable to the clinical trial results obtained from the general population (fda.gov/media/144245/download &144434/download). Conclusions: In this internet-based survey drawn from the Inspire online health community 1335 cancer patients reported receiving COVID-19 vaccinations. Byself-report the vaccines were well tolerated with AEs patterns mimicking clinical trial results conducted in the general population. These safety results should be reassuring to cancer patients although attention to COVID-19 vaccine efficacy is required (and will be studied during follow-up surveys).

4.
Journal of Clinical Oncology ; 39(15 SUPPL), 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1339179

ABSTRACT

Background: Vaccines are a major step towards control of the COVID-19 pandemic. Estimates from multiple surveys of the general public indicate that 40 to 60% plan to be vaccinated, with some data suggesting that uptake differs by political leanings. The views of people with cancer on COVID-19 vaccination have not been reported. We report survey results of people with cancer, evaluating intent and attitudes toward COVID-19 vaccinations. Methods: An online survey included self-identified patients with cancer, ≥18 years old, in the Inspire Online Community (www.inspire.com). Invitation was restricted to only members of Inspire's cancer support groups who agreed to be contacted for research. Quantitative data were summarized with descriptive statistics. Data were analyzed by chi-square, ANOVA, and post hoc Tamhane' T2 testing. Results: 750 responded with the most common cancers represented being prostate (30%), thyroid (24%) ovarian (20%), bladder (8%) and breast (4%). 44% were between 46 and 65 years old and 48% were over 65. Of these, 38% reported being on active treatment. The majority were white (91%), female (56%) and had a bachelor's degree or higher (72%). Respondents represented the South (38%), West (28%), Midwest (20%), and Northeast (18%). Nearly half of respondents lived in a suburb near a large city. Almost 40% reported an annual income of > $100,000 and 13% reported income < $50,000/year. The proportion that would 'definitely' or 'most probably' get the COVID-19 vaccine was 80%, with significantly greater interest in people with prostate (85%), bladder (82%) and ovarian cancer (81%). Those with breast cancer reported the highest levels of being uncertain (23%) and 30% of those with thyroid cancer reported they would 'probably' or 'definitely' not get vaccinated. Older age, male sex, and college graduates were significantly more likely to get vaccinated. Concerns about side effects were reported by 54%, with younger patients significantly more concerned than those 66 years and older. Of 158 participants who listed other reasons they would not get vaccinated, 23% were concerned that the research and development was rushed and 11% worried about how it might interact with a compromised immune system. Using the 2020 Electoral College map to indicate political leaning at the state level, there was no significant difference in vaccine uptake, although significantly more people from blue states agreed that vaccination was the best defense against COVID-19 compared to those from red states (67 vs 33%, p <.05). Conclusions: People with cancer are much more interested in COVID-19 vaccination compared to the general public. Despite this, a large percentage of people with cancer reported distrust in either the government and/or the healthcare industry. Although vaccine attitudes tracked with political leanings at the state level, intention to get vaccinated did not.

SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL