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1.
The Egyptian journal of neurology, psychiatry and neurosurgery ; 58(1), 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-2045485

ABSTRACT

Background The spectrum of reported neurological sequelae associated with SARS-CoV-2 is continuously expanding, immune mediated neuropathies like Guillain–Barre syndrome (GBS) and exacerbations of preexisting chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) being among them. However, respective cases of acute onset CIDP (A-CIDP) are rare. Case presentation We hereby report two cases of A-CIDP after COVID-19 infection and Ad26.COV2.S vaccination that presented with flaccid paraparesis and acroparesthesias (Case presentation 1;female, 52) and facial diplegia accompanied by acroparesthesias (Case presentation 2;male, 62), respectively. In both instances clinical, neurophysiological and CSF findings were indicative of acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, thus both patients were initially treated with intravenous immunoglobulins resulting in clinical improvement. Nevertheless, the first patient relapsed 5 weeks after the initial episode, thus was diagnosed with GBS with treatment related fluctuations (GBS-TRF) and treated successfully with seven plasma exchange (PLEX) sessions. However, 11 weeks from symptom onset she relapsed again. Taking into account that the second relapse occurred more than 8 weeks after the first episode, the potential diagnosis of A-CIDP was reached and oral dexamethasone 40 mg/d for 4 consecutive days every 4 weeks was administered. With regards to the second patient, he relapsed > 8 weeks after the initial episode, thus was also diagnosed with A-CIDP and treated with 7 PLEX sessions followed by similar to the aforementioned corticosteroid therapy. On 2 month follow-up both patients exhibited remarkable clinical improvement. Conclusions Close surveillance of patients presenting with immune neuropathies in the context of SARS-CoV-2 infection or immunization is crucial for timely implementation of appropriate treatment. Prompt A-CIDP distinction from GBS-TRF is of paramount importance as treatment approach and prognosis between these two entities differ. Supplementary Information The online version contains supplementary material available at 10.1186/s41983-022-00515-4.

2.
J Med Virol ; 94(5): 1935-1949, 2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1777575

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic and related restrictions can impact mental health. To quantify the mental health burden of COVID-19 pandemic, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis, searching World Health Organization COVID-19/PsycInfo/PubMed databases (09/29/2020), including observational studies reporting on mental health outcomes in any population affected by COVID-19. Primary outcomes were the prevalence of anxiety, depression, stress, sleep problems, posttraumatic symptoms. Sensitivity analyses were conducted on severe mental health problems, in high-quality studies, and in representative samples. Subgroup analyses were conducted stratified by age, sex, country income level, and COVID-19 infection status. One-hundred-seventy-three studies from February to July 2020 were included (n = 502,261, median sample = 948, age = 34.4 years, females = 63%). Ninety-one percent were cross-sectional studies, and 18.5%/57.2% were of high/moderate quality. The highest prevalence emerged for posttraumatic symptoms in COVID-19 infected people (94%), followed by behavioral problems in those with prior mental disorders (77%), fear in healthcare workers (71%), anxiety in caregivers/family members of people with COVID-19 (42%), general health/social contact/passive coping style in the general population (38%), depression in those with prior somatic disorders (37%), and fear in other-than-healthcare workers (29%). Females and people with COVID-19 infection had higher rates of almost all outcomes; college students/young adults of anxiety, depression, sleep problems, suicidal ideation; adults of fear and posttraumatic symptoms. Anxiety, depression, and posttraumatic symptoms were more prevalent in low-/middle-income countries, sleep problems in high-income countries. The COVID-19 pandemic adversely impacts mental health in a unique manner across population subgroups. Our results inform tailored preventive strategies and interventions to mitigate current, future, and transgenerational adverse mental health of the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Depression/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Mental Health , Prevalence , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
3.
Postgrad Med J ; 98(1159): 321-327, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1158120

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 pandemic has undoubtedly disrupted the well-established, traditional structure of medical education. Τhe new limitations of physical presence have accelerated the development of an online learning environment, comprising both of asynchronous and synchronous distance education, and the introduction of novel ways of student assessment. At the same time, this prolonged crisis had serious implications on the lives of medical students including their psychological well-being and the impact on their academic trajectories. The new reality has, on many occasions, triggered the 'acting up' of medical students as frontline healthcare staff, which has been perceived by many of them as a positive learning and contributing experience, and has led to a variety of responses from the educational institutions. All things considered, the urgency for rapid and novel adaptations to the new circumstances has functioned as a springboard for remarkable innovations in medical education,including the promotion of a more "evidence-based" approach.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance , Education, Medical , Students, Medical , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Exp Ther Med ; 21(3): 244, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1073518

ABSTRACT

As one year is approaching since the beginning of the Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, it is important to acknowledge the detrimental effect that it is having on mental health at the individual, societal and public health levels. The current review presents the direct and indirect psychological impact of COVID-19 on the general public, as well as on vulnerable groups, including the elderly, the young, healthcare professionals, people with pre-existing mental health issues, those infected by COVID-19, homeless people and refugees. Important findings are discussed in the present review, including the social stigma in older people associated with portraying COVID-19 as the disease of the elderly, and the limited psychological impact of COVID-19 in the severely mentally ill, alongside the response of the mental healthcare systems globally to this unparalleled public health crisis. The important lessons to be learnt so far can help formulate individual mental health recommendations, as well as improved intervention and prevention public health strategies.

5.
Exp Ther Med ; 20(3): 2812-2814, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-695714

ABSTRACT

Stress induced (Takotsubo) cardiomyopathy (TC) represents an acute heart failure syndrome triggered by physical or emotional stressors. COVID-19 pandemic has caused an unprecedented health crisis resulting in fear, distress and anxiety, with emerging cardiovascular implications. COVID-19 related stress can act as potential trigger for TC. We present a case of an elderly female who developed TC due to stress surrounding COVID-19.

6.
Exp Ther Med ; 20(3): 1843-1844, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-692752

ABSTRACT

As the focus of the COVID-19 crisis is gradually taken away from emergency healthcare needs, increased attention is warranted on the psychological impact of the pandemic on a global level. Existing guidance on managing the COVID-19 related distress needs to be better informed by upcoming larger-scale research. Applying e-Health can be useful in dealing with the immediate psychological needs, while developing strategies to identify vulnerable populations and shifting the provision of mental health and social care to community services need to be prioritised when looking at the future. Focusing on global mental health during this universal crisis is an opportunity for promoting a more compassionate and less discriminating society.

7.
Oncol Lett ; 20(1): 441-447, 2020 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-626618

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 has caused unprecedented societal turmoil, triggering a rapid, still ongoing, transformation of healthcare provision on a global level. In this new landscape, it is highly important to acknowledge the challenges this pandemic poses on the care of the particularly vulnerable cancer patients and the subsequent psychosocial impact on them. We have outlined our clinical experience in managing patients with gastrointestinal, hematological, gynaecological, dermatological, neurological, thyroid, lung and paediatric cancers in the COVID-19 era and have reviewed the emerging literature around barriers to care of oncology patients and how this crisis affects them. Moreover, evolving treatment strategies and novel ways of addressing the needs of oncology patients in the new context of the pandemic are discussed.

8.
Exp Ther Med ; 20(1): 159-162, 2020 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-380042

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 pandemic has caused a global public health emergency resulting in unprecedented individual and societal fear and anxiety. The stress surrounding this biothreat appears to have clinical implications in all aspects of medicine, both in mental and physical health spheres. The impact of COVID-19 related anxiety in Cardiology, Paediatrics, Oncology, Dermatology, Neurology and Mental Health and how it affects treatments is discussed. Moreover, the need for introducing novel communication and therapeutic approaches is highlighted in the new landscape of the COVID-19 era.

9.
Exp Ther Med ; 19(6): 3451-3453, 2020 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-87404

ABSTRACT

In light of the unprecedented public health crisis of the COVID-19 pandemic, it is highly important to acknowledge the psychological impact of this mounting threat on healthcare professionals. Previous experience from smaller scale epidemics and emerging literature around COVID-19 show that the unparalleled amount of stress that healthcare workers are dealing with, is associated with increased psychological morbidities. We have depicted the psychological burden that the COVID-19 pandemic has posed on healthcare professionals in Greece and have reviewed the literature around the effect of previous epidemics on frontline healthcare staff. Moreover, we discuss potential triggers and the need for measures to minimise the psychological pressure on those at the frontline against this biothreat.

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