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3.
J Clin Med ; 10(21)2021 Oct 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1480827

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: A high incidence of venous thromboembolism (VTE) is reported in hospitalized COVID-19 patients, in particular in patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU). In patients with respiratory tract infections, including influenza A (H1N1), many studies have demonstrated an increased incidence of thromboses, but evidence is lacking regarding the risk difference (RD) of the occurrence of VTE between COVID-19 and non-COVID-19 patients. METHODS: In this systematic review with meta-analysis, we evaluated the RD of the occurrence of VTE, pulmonary embolism (PE), and deep venous thrombosis (DVT) between COVID-19 and other pulmonary infection cohorts, in particular H1N1, and in an ICU setting. We searched for all studies comparing COVID-19 vs. non-COVID-19 regarding VTE, PE, and DVT. RESULTS: The systematic review included 12 studies and 1,013,495 patients. The RD for VTE in COVID-19 compared to non-COVID-19 patients was 0.06 (95% CI 0.11-0.25, p = 0.011, I2 = 97%), and 0.16 in ICU (95% CI 0.045-0.27, p = 0.006, I2 = 80%). The RD for PE between COVID-19 and non-COVID-19 patients was 0.03 (95% CI, 0.006-0.045, p = 0.01, I2 = 89%). The RD for PE between COVID-19 and non-COVID-19 patients was 0.021 in retrospective studies (95% CI 0.00-0.04, p = 0.048, I2 = 92%) and 0.11 in ICU studies (95% CI 0.06-0.16, p < 0.001, I2 = 0%). CONCLUSIONS: The growing awareness and understanding of a massive inflammatory response combined with a hypercoagulable state that predisposes patients to thrombosis in COVID-19, in particular in the ICU, may contribute to a more appropriate strategy of prevention and earlier detection of the thrombotic events.

5.
Viruses ; 13(9)2021 08 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1390782

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: According to recent guidelines, all hospitalized patients with COVID-19 should receive pharmacological prophylaxis for venous thromboembolism (VTE), unless there are specific contraindications. However, the optimal preventive strategy in terms of intensity of anticoagulation for these patients is not well established. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the impact of individualized regimens of enoxaparin on the development of VTE and on the risk of major bleeding complications during hospitalization in patients with COVID-19 infection. METHODS: All consecutive patients admitted to the medical wards of six Italian hospitals between 15 September and 15 October 2020 with COVID-19 infection of moderate severity were administered enoxaparin in subcutaneous daily doses adjusted to the Padua Prediction Score stratification model: No heparin in patients scoring less than 4, 4000 IU daily in those scoring 4, 6000 IU in those scoring 5, and 8000 in those scoring six or more. Objective tests were performed in patients developing clinical symptoms of deep vein thrombosis and/or pulmonary embolism. Bleeding complications were defined according to the ISTH classification. RESULTS: From the 154 eligible patients, enoxaparin was administered in all: 4000 IU in 73 patients, 6000 IU in 53, and 8000 IU in the remaining 28. During the course of hospitalization, 27 patients (17.5%) died. VTE developed in 14 of the 154 patients (9.1%; 95% CI, 4.6% to 13.6%), and was fatal in 1. Major bleeding complications developed in 35 patients (22.7%; 95% CI, 16.1% to 29.3%), and were fatal in 8. CONCLUSIONS: Despite the use of risk-adjusted doses of enoxaparin, the rate of VTE events was consistent with that reported in contemporary studies where fixed-dose low-molecular-weight heparin was used. The unexpectedly high risk of bleeding complications should induce caution in administering enoxaparin in doses higher than the conventional low ones.


Subject(s)
Anticoagulants/administration & dosage , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/virology , Heparin/administration & dosage , SARS-CoV-2 , Venous Thromboembolism/etiology , Venous Thromboembolism/prevention & control , Anticoagulants/adverse effects , Blood Coagulation/drug effects , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Hemorrhage/etiology , Heparin/adverse effects , Humans , Male , Prognosis , Treatment Outcome
6.
Semin Thromb Hemost ; 48(1): 100-108, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1356593

ABSTRACT

Coagulation abnormalities, thrombosis, and endothelial dysfunction have been described in COVID-19 patients. Spontaneous muscle hematoma (SMH) is a rare complication in COVID-19. The aims of this study are to: (1) perform a systematic review of the literature to better define the clinical SMH characteristics, (2) describe the prevalence and the clinical characteristics of SMH in COVID-19 patients referring to a Department of Internal Medicine (IM) (Federico II University of Naples), a Department of Sub-Intensive Care Medicine (SIM) (Ospedale Del Mare), and a Department of Intensive Care Unit (ICU) (Federico II University). The systematic review was performed according to PRISMA criteria. The local prevalence of SMH in COVID-19 was evaluated retrospectively. The medical records of all COVID-19 patients referring to IM and ICU from March 11th, 2020, to February 28th, 2021 were examined for SMH occurrence. In our retrospective analysis, we describe 10 cases of COVID-19 patients with SMH not previously reported in literature, with a prevalence of 2.1%. The literature review, inclusive of our case series, describes a total of 50 SMHs in COVID-19 patients (57.4% males; mean age 68.8 ± 10.0 years). The SMH sites were ileo-psoas, vastus intermedius, gluteus, sternocleidomastoid, and pectoralis major muscles. Males developed SMH earlier than females (9.5 ± 7.8 vs. 17.1 ± 9.7 days). Ileo-psoas hematoma was more frequent in males (69.2 vs. 30.8%), while pectoralis major hematoma occurred only in females. The in-hospital mortality rate of SMH in COVID-19 patients was 32.4%. SMH is a rare but severe complication in COVID-19 hospitalized patients, associated with high mortality. A gender difference seems to be present in the clinical presentation of the disorder.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Aged , Animals , Female , Hematoma/diagnostic imaging , Hematoma/etiology , Horses , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Muscles , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
7.
J Clin Med ; 10(11)2021 06 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1259523

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 is an infection due to SARS-CoV-2; this virus has been identified as the cause of the present pandemic. Several typical characteristics are present in this infection, in particular pneumonia with possible lung failure, but atypical clinical presentations are being described daily by physicians around the world. Ground-glass opacities with pneumonia are the most common and dangerous presentations of the COVID-19 disease, and they are usually associated with positive nasopharyngeal swab (NPS) tests with detectable SARS-CoV-2 viral RNA. Compared to the general population, hospital workers have been at a greater risk of infection ever since the first patients were hospitalized. However, hospital workers have also been reported as having COVID-like symptoms despite repeated negative swab tests but having tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 antibodies with serological tests. We can postulate that a COVID-like syndrome is possible, in particular in hospital workers, that is characterized by symptoms similar to those of COVID-19, but with repeated negative nasopharyngeal swabs. These repeated negative NSPs make the difference in daily clinical management with people that experienced a single false negative nasopharyngeal swab; furthermore, a clear clinical differentiation of these situations is still lacking in the literature. For this reason, here, we report our main findings from a cohort of patients with a COVID-like syndrome compared to a similar group affected by typical COVID-19.

8.
J Public Health (Oxf) ; 2021 05 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1226554

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The aims of this study were: to investigate the capacity of the rare disease healthcare network in Campania to diagnose patients with rare diseases during the outbreak of Covid-19; and to shed light on problematic diagnoses during this period. METHODS: To describe the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic on the diagnosis of patients with rare diseases, a retrospective analysis of the Campania Region Rare Disease Registry was performed. A tailored questionnaire was sent to rare disease experts to investigate major issues during the emergency period. RESULTS: Prevalence of new diagnoses of rare disease in March and April 2020 was significantly lower than in 2019 (117 versus 317, P < 0.001 and 37 versus 349, P < 0.001, respectively) and 2018 (117 versus 389, P < 0.001 and 37 versus 282, P < 0.001, respectively). Eighty-two among 98 rare disease experts completed the questionnaire. Diagnostic success (95%), access to diagnosis (80%) and follow-up (72%), lack of Personal Protective Equipment (60%), lack of Covid-19 guidelines (50%) and the need for home therapy (78%) were the most important issues raised during Covid-19 outbreak. CONCLUSIONS: This study describes the effects of the Covid-19 outbreak on the diagnosis of rare disease in a single Italian region and investigates potential issues of diagnosis and management during this period.

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