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1.
Neurology ; 96(23): e2824-e2838, 2021 06 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1261288

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To measure the global impact of COVID-19 pandemic on volumes of IV thrombolysis (IVT), IVT transfers, and stroke hospitalizations over 4 months at the height of the pandemic (March 1 to June 30, 2020) compared with 2 control 4-month periods. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional, observational, retrospective study across 6 continents, 70 countries, and 457 stroke centers. Diagnoses were identified by their ICD-10 codes or classifications in stroke databases. RESULTS: There were 91,373 stroke admissions in the 4 months immediately before compared to 80,894 admissions during the pandemic months, representing an 11.5% (95% confidence interval [CI] -11.7 to -11.3, p < 0.0001) decline. There were 13,334 IVT therapies in the 4 months preceding compared to 11,570 procedures during the pandemic, representing a 13.2% (95% CI -13.8 to -12.7, p < 0.0001) drop. Interfacility IVT transfers decreased from 1,337 to 1,178, or an 11.9% decrease (95% CI -13.7 to -10.3, p = 0.001). Recovery of stroke hospitalization volume (9.5%, 95% CI 9.2-9.8, p < 0.0001) was noted over the 2 later (May, June) vs the 2 earlier (March, April) pandemic months. There was a 1.48% stroke rate across 119,967 COVID-19 hospitalizations. Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection was noted in 3.3% (1,722/52,026) of all stroke admissions. CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 pandemic was associated with a global decline in the volume of stroke hospitalizations, IVT, and interfacility IVT transfers. Primary stroke centers and centers with higher COVID-19 inpatient volumes experienced steeper declines. Recovery of stroke hospitalization was noted in the later pandemic months.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Stroke , Cross-Sectional Studies , Hospitalization , Humans , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Stroke/drug therapy , Stroke/epidemiology , Thrombolytic Therapy
2.
Neurology ; 96(23): e2824-e2838, 2021 06 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1154058

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To measure the global impact of COVID-19 pandemic on volumes of IV thrombolysis (IVT), IVT transfers, and stroke hospitalizations over 4 months at the height of the pandemic (March 1 to June 30, 2020) compared with 2 control 4-month periods. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional, observational, retrospective study across 6 continents, 70 countries, and 457 stroke centers. Diagnoses were identified by their ICD-10 codes or classifications in stroke databases. RESULTS: There were 91,373 stroke admissions in the 4 months immediately before compared to 80,894 admissions during the pandemic months, representing an 11.5% (95% confidence interval [CI] -11.7 to -11.3, p < 0.0001) decline. There were 13,334 IVT therapies in the 4 months preceding compared to 11,570 procedures during the pandemic, representing a 13.2% (95% CI -13.8 to -12.7, p < 0.0001) drop. Interfacility IVT transfers decreased from 1,337 to 1,178, or an 11.9% decrease (95% CI -13.7 to -10.3, p = 0.001). Recovery of stroke hospitalization volume (9.5%, 95% CI 9.2-9.8, p < 0.0001) was noted over the 2 later (May, June) vs the 2 earlier (March, April) pandemic months. There was a 1.48% stroke rate across 119,967 COVID-19 hospitalizations. Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection was noted in 3.3% (1,722/52,026) of all stroke admissions. CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 pandemic was associated with a global decline in the volume of stroke hospitalizations, IVT, and interfacility IVT transfers. Primary stroke centers and centers with higher COVID-19 inpatient volumes experienced steeper declines. Recovery of stroke hospitalization was noted in the later pandemic months.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Stroke , Cross-Sectional Studies , Hospitalization , Humans , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Stroke/drug therapy , Stroke/epidemiology , Thrombolytic Therapy
3.
J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis ; 29(12): 105362, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-872318

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic has presented challenges to managing vascular risk factors with in-person follow-up of patients with asymptomatic carotid stenosis enrolled in the CREST2 trial. CREST2 is comparing intensive medical management alone versus intensive medical management plus revascularization with endarterectomy or stenting. We performed a study to evaluate the feasibility of a home-based program for testing blood pressure (BP) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) in CREST2. METHODS: This study involved 45 patients at 10 sites in the CREST2 trial. The initial patients were identified by the Medical Management Core (MMC) as high-risk patients defined by stage 2 hypertension, LDL > 90 mg/dl, or both. If a patient at the site declined participation, another was substituted. All patients who agreed to participate were sent a BP monitoring device and a commercially available at-home lipid test kit that uses a self-performed finger-stick blood sample that was resulted to the patient. Training on the use of the equipment and obtaining the risk factor results was done by the study coordinator by telephone. RESULTS: Ten of the 130 currently active CREST2 sites participated, 8 in the LDL portion and 5 in the BP portion (3 sites did both). Twenty-six BP devices and 23 lipid tests were sent to patients. Of the 26 patients who obtained BP readings with the devices, 9 were out of the study target and adjustments in BP medications were made in 3. Of the 23 patients sent LDL tests, 13 were able to perform the test showing 7 were out of target, leading to adjustments in lipid medications in 4. CONCLUSION: This study established the feasibility of at-home monitoring of BP and LDL in a clinical trial and identified implementation challenges prior to widespread use in the trial. (ClinicalTrials.gov number NCT02089217).


Subject(s)
Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory , Blood Pressure , COVID-19 , Carotid Stenosis/therapy , Lipoproteins, LDL/blood , Reagent Kits, Diagnostic , Biomarkers/blood , Carotid Stenosis/blood , Carotid Stenosis/diagnosis , Carotid Stenosis/physiopathology , Feasibility Studies , Humans , Predictive Value of Tests , Reproducibility of Results , Treatment Outcome , United States
4.
Neurology ; 95(1): 29-36, 2020 07 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-155213

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic has disrupted the lives of whole communities and nations. The multinational multicenter National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke Carotid Revascularization and Medical Management for Asymptomatic Carotid Stenosis Trial stroke prevention trial rapidly experienced the effects of the pandemic and had to temporarily suspend new enrollments and shift patient follow-up activities from in-person clinic visits to telephone contacts. There is an ethical obligation to the patients to protect their health while taking every feasible step to ensure that the goals of the trial are successfully met. Here, we describe the effects of the pandemic on the trial and steps that are being taken to mitigate the effects of the pandemic so that trial objectives can be met.


Subject(s)
Carotid Stenosis/therapy , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic/methods , Stroke/prevention & control , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Blockers/therapeutic use , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Asymptomatic Diseases , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Canada/epidemiology , Carotid Stenosis/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Comorbidity , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Dyslipidemias/epidemiology , Elective Surgical Procedures , Female , Humans , Hypertension/epidemiology , Infection Control/methods , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Selection , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Spain/epidemiology , Telemedicine , United States/epidemiology
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