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3.
Inflamm Bowel Dis ; 28(6): e76-e77, 2022 06 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1853079

ABSTRACT

A 47-year-old woman developed a de novo occurrence of Crohn's disease after coronavirus disease 2019. This is an unusual occurrence and suggests that severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 could trigger inflammatory bowel disease in predisposed people.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Colitis, Ulcerative , Crohn Disease , Proctocolectomy, Restorative , Colitis, Ulcerative/surgery , Crohn Disease/complications , Crohn Disease/surgery , Humans
4.
Foods ; 11(8)2022 Apr 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1809801

ABSTRACT

Kefiran is a heteropolysaccharide biopolymer usually extracted from kefir grains cultured in cow milk. Due to the lack of information on exopolysaccharides from other types of animal milk, in the present study, cow, buffalo and goat milks were used as raw materials for fermentation. The kefiran extractions from kefir grains were carried out with cold water (method I), hot water (method II) and mild heated water-ultrasound (method III), and then the recovery yield and the physicochemical properties of the kefirans were evaluated to establish the influence of both the extraction conditions and the type of milk. The highest yield was recorded for the cow kefiran using method III (4.79%). The recoveries of goat and buffalo kefirans with methods II and III were similar (2.75-2.81%). Method I had the lowest yields (0.15-0.48%). The physicochemical characteristics were studied with Fourier Transform-Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC). Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy showed the same qualitative profile for all the samples, regardless of the method and the type of milk, confirming that the extraction methods did not affect the chemical structure of the kefirans. Otherwise, the thermal and morphological features of the samples showed differences according to both the type of the milk and the extraction method. The kefiran samples were very thermally stable, having a temperature of degradation (Td) in the range from 264 to 354 °C. The resulting morphological and thermal differences could lead to different practical applications of kefirans in the fields of nutrition and pharmacology.

5.
Biomedicines ; 10(4)2022 Apr 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1776130

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection has raised concerns in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), not only due to consequences of coronavirus disease 2019 itself but also as a possible cause of IBD relapse. The main objective of this study was to assess the role of SARS-CoV-2 in IBD clinical recurrence in a cohort of patients undergoing biological therapy. Second, we evaluated the difference in C-reactive protein (CRP) levels between the start and end of the follow-up period (ΔCRP) and the rate of biological therapy discontinuation. Patients with IBD positive for SARS-CoV-2 infection were compared with non-infected patients. IBD recurrence was defined as the need for intensification of current therapy. We enrolled 95 IBD patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection and 190 non-infected patients. During follow-up, 11 of 95 (11.6%) SARS-CoV-2-infected patients experienced disease recurrence compared to 21 of 190 (11.3%) in the control group (p = 0.894). Forty-six (48.4%) SARS-CoV-2-infected patients discontinued biological therapy versus seven (3.7%) in the control group (p < 0.01). In the multivariate analysis, biological agent discontinuation (p = 0.033) and ΔCRP (p = 0.017), but not SARS-CoV-2 infection (p = 0.298), were associated with IBD recurrence. SARS-CoV-2 infection was not associated with increased IBD recurrence rates in this cohort of patients treated with biological agents.

6.
Inflammatory bowel diseases ; 2021.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1602584

ABSTRACT

Lay Summary A 47-year-old woman developed a de novo occurrence of Crohn’s disease after coronavirus disease 2019. This is an unusual occurrence and suggests that severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 could trigger inflammatory bowel disease in predisposed people.

10.
Therap Adv Gastroenterol ; 13: 1756284820968747, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-892354

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has raised several concerns for patients with chronic immune-mediated diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). As the outbreak appears to be in the descending phase, at least in some part of the world, as in most European countries, guidance is urgently needed to provide optimal care for our IBD patients in order to gradually and safely reduce the gap in care that has been accumulated in the months of lockdown and to face all the backlogs. Therefore, we have provided a decalogue of practical recommendations for gastroenterologists to manage patients with IBD in the post-peak phase of the COVID-19 pandemic. They include all the aspects of IBD care, not only pharmacological ones but also endoscopy, surgery, psychological treatment, telemedicine, diagnostics and educational tasks provided by doctors and patient associations.

11.
12.
Am J Gastroenterol ; 115(10): 1722-1724, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-725265

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: It has been hypothesized that people suffering from inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have an increased risk of coronavirus disease (COVID-19). However, it is not known whether immunosuppressive therapies exacerbate the COVID-19 outcome. METHODS: We reviewed data on the prevalence and clinical outcomes of COVID-19 in patients with IBD. RESULTS: COVID-19 prevalence in patients with IBD was comparable with that in the general population. Therapies using antitumor necrosis factor-α agents have been associated with better clinical outcomes. DISCUSSION: Management and treatments provided by gastroenterologists were effective in reducing COVID-19 risk. Antitumor necrosis factor-α agents seem to mitigate the course of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Immunosuppressive Agents/therapeutic use , Inflammatory Bowel Diseases/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/therapeutic use , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , Clinical Laboratory Techniques/statistics & numerical data , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Humans , Inflammatory Bowel Diseases/immunology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Prevalence , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/antagonists & inhibitors , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/immunology , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/pharmacology
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