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1.
J Neurosurg Sci ; 2022 Sep 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2040595

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Social media use in neurosurgery remains an understudied phenomenon. Our study aims to examine the global membership and engagement of the prominent Neurosurgery Cocktail Facebook group with over 25,000 neurosurgeons and trainees worldwide, specifically during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: Neurosurgery Cocktail's numbers of members, posts, comments, and reactions were collected from December 2019 to November 2020. Anonymized aggregate data of members' characteristics, including age, sex, and country of origin in November 2020, were also obtained. The most engaging posts in November 2020 were categorized into topics by a majority consensus of 3 reviewers. RESULTS: The average number of members steadily increased from 21,266 in December 2019 to 25,218 in November 2020. In November 2020, 18.8% of members were women, and 71.3% were between 25-44 years old. With members from 100 countries, 77.9% are from low-and middle-income countries, with the highest representation from India, Egypt, and Brazil. After the COVID-19 pandemic declaration, daily engagement peaked in April 2020 with a daily average of 41.63 posts, 336.4 comments, and 1,914.6 reactions before returning to prepandemic levels. Among the 99 top posts in November 2020, the majority (56.5%) were classified as "interesting cases", with "education-related" as the second-most common topic (16.2%). CONCLUSIONS: Neurosurgery Cocktail has shown steady growth since its creation. The COVID-19 pandemic was correlated with a spike in activity without lasting impact. The group demonstrates social media's potential for knowledge exchange and promoting organic international collaborations.

2.
World Neurosurg ; 2022 Sep 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2031745

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic committees of all countries restricted face-to-face interactions. This study aimed to determine how the pandemic changed the research output for many neurosurgeons while highlighting how social media may have been used as a contactless platform to maintain research productivity during these times. METHODS: A cross-sectional, descriptive, 24-item, and non-randomized online survey was applied worldwide, and shared using social media platforms and emails. The questions mainly focused on comparing the results of the pre-pandemic period to the pandemic period (after March 2020). RESULTS: A total of 202 respondents from 60 different countries responded to the survey. Interest in neurosurgical education increased from 24% to 76%, while the topic of epidemiology gained interest from 28% to 72% when the pre-pandemic era was compared to the pandemic era. Preference for prospective studies decreased from 66% to 34%, while interest in retrospective studies increased from 39% to 61%. In evaluating publication types, the preference for reviews increased from 36% to 64%. Sixty-two percent of the respondents stated they had concerns over delays in individual contributions/lack of accountability. These concerns were followed by problems with theft of intellectual property/data and authorship disputes. Forty-one percent believed that the support of extra hands on a load-heavy project was the most powerful benefit of social media collaboration. Those who reported increased publications during the pandemic were also more likely to collaborate using social media (P = 0.030). CONCLUSIONS: During the pandemic, social media collaborations helped increase research output for neurosurgeons.

3.
Neurol Int ; 14(2): 391-405, 2022 Apr 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1810056

ABSTRACT

Stroke is a fatal morbidity that needs emergency medical admission and immediate medical attention. COVID-19 ischemic brain damage is closely associated with common neurological symptoms, which are extremely difficult to treat medically, and risk factors. We performed literature research about COVID-19 and ischemia in PubMed, MEDLINE, and Scopus for this current narrative review. We discovered parallel manifestations of SARS-CoV-19 infection and brain ischemia risk factors. In published papers, we discovered a similar but complex pathophysiology of SARS-CoV-2 infection and stroke pathology. A patient with other systemic co-morbidities, such as diabetes, hypertension, or any respiratory disease, has a fatal combination in intensive care management when infected with SARS-CoV-19. Furthermore, due to their shared risk factors, COVID-19 and stroke are a lethal combination for medical management to treat. In this review, we discuss shared pathophysiology, adjuvant risk factors, challenges, and advancements in stroke-associated COVID-19 therapeutics.

4.
Surg Neurol Int ; 12: 181, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1227267

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The treatment of spontaneous spinal epidural hematomas (SSEHs), depending on the lesion size and myeloradicular involvement, can be surgical or conservative. Here, we present a 55-year-old patient who sustained a SSEH several months following a systemic SARS-CoV-2 infection. CASE DESCRIPTION: A 55-year-old immunocompromised female (i.e., history 17 years ago of Hodgkin's lymphoma, nodular sclerosis variant) recently developed a SARS-CoV-2 infection treated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents. She then reported the sudden onset of cervicodorsalgia after a slight cervical flexion/extension maneuver. The brain and cervicothoracic spine MRI studies documented a clival anterior spinal epidural hematoma with maximum spinal compression at the T1-T2 level; it also extended inferiorly to the T6 level. Two weeks later, the follow-up MRI showed a remarkable reduction in the anteroposterior diameter of the hematoma that correlated with significant neurological improvement and almost complete pain regression. She was discharged after a total 15-day hospital stay, with complete symptoms relief. CONCLUSION: We present a 55-year-old chronically immunocompromised (i.e., due to the history of Hodgkin's lymphoma) female who, following a SARS-CoV-2 infection, developed an anterior SSEH extending from the clivus to the T6 spinal level that spontaneously regressed without surgical intervention.

6.
Neurosurgery ; 87(4): 854-856, 2020 09 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-641027

ABSTRACT

Even though neurosurgeons exercise these enormous and versatile skills, the COVID-19 pandemic has shaken the fabrics of the global neurosurgical family, jeopardizing human lives, and forcing the entire world to be locked down. We stand on the shoulders of the giants and will not forget their examples and their teachings. We will work to the best of our ability to honor their memory. Professor Harvey Cushing said: "When to take great risks; when to withdraw in the face of unexpected difficulties; whether to force an attempted enucleation of a pathologically favorable tumor to its completion with the prospect of an operative fatality, or to abandon the procedure short of completeness with the certainty that after months or years even greater risks may have to be faced at a subsequent session-all these require surgical judgment which is a matter of long experience." It is up to us, therefore, to keep on the noble path that we have decided to undertake, to accumulate the surgical experience that these icons have shown us, the fruit of sacrifice and obstinacy. Our tribute goes to them; we will always remember their excellent work and their brilliant careers that will continue to enlighten all of us.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/history , Neurosurgery/history , Pandemics/history , Pneumonia, Viral/history , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , History, 21st Century , Humans , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , SARS-CoV-2
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