Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 15 de 15
Filter
1.
J Am Geriatr Soc ; 2022 Mar 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1764975

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: SARS-CoV-2 vaccination has significantly reduced infection, hospitalization, and lethality rates among nursing home (NH) residents, but durability of vaccine effects remains unknown. This study investigated the long-term impact of BNT162b2 SARS-CoV-2 vaccine on breakthrough infection rates in the NHs of Florence, Italy. METHODS: Participants included residents living in Florence NHs as of April 1st, 2021, who had completed the primary SARS-CoV2 vaccination course by February 15th, 2021. Weekly rates of breakthrough infection were calculated between April 1st and October 31st 2021, with 7-day incidence defined as the number of new confirmed SARS-CoV-2-positive residents over the vaccinated resident census. Hospital admissions and deaths were recorded from local administrative and clinical sources. Patients admitted to NHs after April 1st were excluded to avoid confounding effect of different vaccination timing. RESULTS: Among 2271 vaccinated residents (mean age 86.6, 74% female), we recorded 105 cases of breakthrough infections. Rates of breakthrough infection remained very low in the 6 months after vaccination, but started to rise over the following months, peaking at 0.94%, and then became stable around 0.2%-0.3%. Over the study period, infection rates remained low as compared to the incidence of SARS-CoV-2 infection during pre-vaccination period. Overall hospitalization and lethality rates were 8%. CONCLUSIONS: Among vaccinated NH residents, rates of breakthrough SARS-CoV-2 infection, hospitalization and lethality remained low up to 9 months following primary vaccination course. A mild resurgence of SARS-CoV-2 infection, after 6 months from vaccination, suggests a decline of vaccine effectiveness in preventing transmission.

2.
J Am Med Dir Assoc ; 23(3): 414-420.e1, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1611796

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Studies suggesting that vulnerability increased short-term mortality in older patients with COVID-19 enrolled hospitalized patients and lacked COVID-negative comparators. Aim of this study was to examine the relationship between frailty and 1-year mortality in older patients with and without COVID-19, hospitalized and nonhospitalized. DESIGN: Cohort study. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: Patients over 75 years old accessing the emergency departments (ED) were identified from the ED archives in Florence, Italy. METHODS: Vulnerability status was estimated with the Dynamic Silver Code (DSC). COVID-19 hospital discharges (HC+) were compared with non-COVID-19 discharges (HC-). Linkage with a national COVID-19 registry identified nonhospitalized ED visitors with (NHC+) or without COVID-19 (NHC-). RESULTS: In 1 year, 48.4% and 33.9% of 1745 HC+ and 15,846 HC- participants died (P < .001). Mortality increased from 27.5% to 64.0% in HC+ and from 19.9% to 51.1% in HC- across DSC classes I to IV, with HC+ vs HC- hazard ratios between 1.6 and 2.2. Out of 1039 NHC+ and 18,722 NHC- participants, 18% and 8.7% died (P < .001). Mortality increased from 14.2% to 46.7% in NHC+ and from 2.9% to 26% in NHC- across DSC; NHC+ vs NHC- hazard ratios decreased from 5.3 in class I to 2.0 in class IV. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS: In hospitalized older patients, mortality increases with vulnerability similarly in the presence and in the absence of COVID-19. In nonhospitalized patients, vulnerability-associated excess mortality is milder in individuals with than in those without COVID-19. The disease reduces survival even when background risk is low. Thus, apparently uncomplicated patients deserve closer clinical monitoring than commonly applied.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Frailty , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Cohort Studies , Geriatric Assessment , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
3.
J Am Med Dir Assoc ; 23(3): 421-427, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1587368

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To evaluate 6-month risk stratification capacity of the newly developed TeleHFCovid19-Score for remote management of older patients with heart failure (HF) during the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic. DESIGN: Monocentric observational prospective study. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: Older HF outpatients remotely managed during the first pandemic wave. METHODS: The TeleHFCovid19-Score (0-29) was obtained by an ad hoc developed multiparametric standardized questionnaire administered during telephone visits to older HF patients (and/or caregivers) followed at our HF clinic. Questions were weighed on the basis of clinical judgment and review of current HF literature. According to the score, patients were divided in progressively increasing risk groups: green (0-3), yellow (4-8), and red (≥9). RESULTS: A total of 146 patients composed our study population: at baseline, 112, 21, and 13 were classified as green, yellow, and red, respectively. Mean age was 81±9 years, and women were 40%. Compared to patients of red and yellow groups, those in the green group had a lower use of high-dose loop diuretics (P < .001) or thiazide-like diuretics (P = .027) and had reported less frequently dyspnea at rest or for basic activities, new or worsening extremity edema, or weight increase (all P < .001). At 6 months, compared with red (62.2%) and yellow patients (33.3%), green patients (8.9%) presented a significantly lower rate of the composite outcome of cardiovascular death and/or HF hospitalization (P < .001). Moreover, receiver operating characteristic curve analysis showed a high sensibility and specificity of our score at 6 months (area under the curve = 0.789, 95% CI 0.682-0.896, P < .001) with a score <4.5 (very close to green group cutoff) that identified lower-risk subjects. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS: The TeleHFCovid19-Score was able to correctly identify patients with midterm favorable outcome. Therefore, our questionnaire might be used to identify low-risk chronic HF patients who could be temporarily managed remotely, allowing to devote more efforts to the care of higher-risk patients who need closer and on-site clinical evaluations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Heart Failure , Telemedicine , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Female , Heart Failure/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , Prognosis , Prospective Studies , Risk Assessment , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Eur J Intern Med ; 97: 36-41, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1561522

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the persistence of symptoms compatible with COVID-19 in a real-file prospective cohort of patients at 12 months from hospital discharge. METHODS: Longitudinal, prospective, single-center, cohort telephone follow-up (FU) study in a Tertiary Care Hospital. All consecutive patients >18 years admitted for COVID-19 were prospectively enrolled in a telephone FU program aimed at monitoring symptoms after 1,3,6,9 and 12 months from hospital discharge. The survey screened for somatic (fatigue, dyspnea, dyspnea, palpitations, cough, chest pain, abdominal pain, ageusia, anosmia, bowel symptoms) and emotional symptoms (insomnia, confusion, altered sense of reality, loss of appetite, fear, and depression) and frailty. Only patients with 12 months FU data were analyzed (N=254). Prevalence and factors associated with symptoms were the main outcomes. Frailty was defined by the presence of ≥3 indicators: weakness, slowness/impaired mobility, weight-loss, low physical activity, and exhaustion. RESULTS: At 12 months, 40.5% of patients reported at least one symptom. The most common somatic ones were fatigue, exertional dyspnea, cough, bowel complaints while the most common psycho-emotional were insomnia, confusion, fear, and depression. Age, gender, gender, frailty, multiple symptoms at baseline and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) were associated with symptoms persistence. Furthermore, frailty, COPD and multiple symptoms at baseline were associated with increased risk of somatic symptoms at 12 months, while age and gender were associated with emotional ones. CONCLUSIONS: Burden of the long COVID-19 symptoms decreased over time but remained as high as 40% at 12 months with important gender and functional differences, highlighting potential patient categories who may benefit from specific follow up strategies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/complications , Cohort Studies , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
5.
Vaccines (Basel) ; 9(10)2021 Oct 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526863

ABSTRACT

Evidence on the effectiveness of SARS-CoV-2 vaccines in nursing home (NHs) residents is limited. We examined the impact of the BNT162b2 mRNA SARS-CoV-2 vaccine on the course of the epidemic in NHs in the Florence Health District, Italy, before and after vaccination. Moreover, we assessed survival and hospitalization by vaccination status in SARS-CoV-2-positive cases occurring during the post-vaccination period. We calculated the weekly infection rates during the pre-vaccination (1 October-26 December 2020) and post-vaccination period (27 December 2020-31 March 2021). Cox analysis was used to analyze survival by vaccination status. The study involved 3730 residents (mean age 84, 69% female). Weekly infection rates fluctuated during the pre-vaccination period (1.8%-6.5%) and dropped to zero during the post-vaccination period. Nine unvaccinated (UN), 56 partially vaccinated (PV) and 35 fully vaccinated (FV) residents tested SARS-CoV-2+ during the post-vaccination period. FV showed significantly lower hospitalization and mortality rates than PV and UV (hospitalization: FV 3%, PV 14%, UV 33%; mortality: FV 6%, PV 18%, UV 56%). The death risk was 84% and 96% lower in PV (HR 0.157, 95%CI 0.049-0.491) and FV (HR 0.037, 95%CI 0.006-0.223) versus UV. SARS-CoV-2 vaccination was followed by a marked decline in infection rates and was associated with lower morbidity and mortality among infected NH residents.

6.
Aging Clin Exp Res ; 34(1): 249-256, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1491499

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Atrial fibrillation (AF) is often complicated by disabling conditions in the elderly. COVID-19 has high mortality in older people. This study aimed at evaluating the relationship of pre-infection AF with characteristics and survival of older COVID-19 patients. METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed inpatients aged ≥ 60 years enrolled in GeroCovid Observational, a multicenter registry endorsed by the Italian and the Norwegian Societies of Gerontology and Geriatrics. Pre-COVID-19 sociodemographic, functional, and medical data were systematically collected, as well as in-hospital mortality. RESULTS: Between March and June 2020, 808 COVID-19 subjects were enrolled (age 79 ± 9 years; men 51.7%). The prevalence of AF was 21.8%. AF patients were older (82 ± 8 vs. 77 ± 9 years, p < 0.001), had a higher CHA2DS2-VASc score (4.1 ± 1.5 vs. 3.2 ± 1.5, p < 0.001) and were more likely to present almost all comorbidities. At multivariable analysis, advanced age, white blood cell count, the presence of heart and peripheral artery diseases were significantly associated with the presence of AF. In-hospital mortality was higher in AF patients (36.9 vs. 27.5%; OR = 1.55, 95% CI = 1.09-2.20; p = 0.015). A decision tree analysis showed that, in AF subjects, preserved functional status at admission was the most important factor associated with survival. In patients without AF, baseline COVID-19 severity was the most relevant variable related to clinical prognosis. CONCLUSIONS: AF is frequent in older patients with COVID-19, in whom it associates with clinical complexity and high mortality. Pre-infection disability shapes the prognosis of this extremely vulnerable segment of hospitalized subjects. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: GeroCovid Observational was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT04379440).


Subject(s)
Atrial Fibrillation , COVID-19 , Stroke , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Anticoagulants , Atrial Fibrillation/epidemiology , Humans , Male , Registries , Retrospective Studies , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
7.
Eur J Endocrinol ; 185(1): 137-144, 2021 May 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1477604

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Hyponatremia is the most common electrolyte disorder in hospitalized patients and occurs in about 30% of patients with pneumonia. Hyponatremia has been associated with a worse outcome in several pathologic conditions The main objective of this study was to determine whether serum sodium alterations may be independent predictors of the outcome of hospitalized COVID-19 patients. DESIGN AND METHODS: In this observational study, data from 441 laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 patients admitted to a University Hospital were collected. After excluding 61 patients (no serum sodium at admission available, saline solution infusion before sodium assessment, transfer from another hospital), data from 380 patients were analyzed. RESULTS: 274 (72.1%) patients had normonatremia at admission, 87 (22.9%) patients had hyponatremia and 19 (5%) patients had hypernatremia. We found an inverse correlation between serum sodium and IL-6, whereas a direct correlation between serum sodium and PaO2/FiO2 ratio was observed. Patients with hyponatremia had a higher prevalence of non-invasive ventilation and ICU transfer than those with normonatremia or hypernatremia. Hyponatremia was an independent predictor of in-hospital mortality (2.7-fold increase vs normonatremia) and each mEq/L of serum sodium reduction was associated with a 14.4% increased risk of death. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that serum sodium at admission may be considered as an early prognostic marker of disease severity in hospitalized COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Sodium/blood , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/mortality , Comorbidity , Critical Care/statistics & numerical data , Female , Fluorocarbons/blood , Hospital Mortality , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Hydrocarbons, Brominated/blood , Hypernatremia/epidemiology , Hyponatremia/epidemiology , Interleukin-6/blood , Male , Middle Aged , Respiration, Artificial/statistics & numerical data , Retrospective Studies , SARS Virus
8.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(17)2021 08 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1390615

ABSTRACT

The aim of our study was to evaluate the impact of the COVID-19 outbreak on Syncope Units (SUs) Activities in Italy. Methods: Data about types of SU activities and admissions were obtained from 10 SUs throughout Italy, certified by the Italian Multidisciplinary Working Group on Syncope (GIMSI), from 10 March 2020 to 31 December 2020 and compared with the same time frame in 2019. Results: A remarkable reduction in overall non-invasive diagnostic tests (-67%; p < 0.001) and cardiac invasive procedure. Elective cardiac pacing procedures disclosed a significant decrease (-62.7%; p < 0.001); conversely, the decrease of urgent procedures was not significant (-50%; p = 0.08). There was a significantly increased rate of patients who underwent both telemedicine follow-up visits (+225%, p < 0.001) and cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) remote monitoring follow-up visits (+100%; p < 0.001). Conclusion: The COVID-19 outbreak was associated with a remarkable decrease in all clinical activities of Syncope Units in Italy, including both non-invasive tests and cardiac invasive procedures; conversely, a significant increase in telehealth activities was shown.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Disease Outbreaks , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Syncope/epidemiology
9.
Aging Clin Exp Res ; 33(10): 2917-2924, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1366433

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Nursing home (NH) residents have been dramatically affected by COVID-19, with extremely high rates of hospitalization and mortality. AIMS: To describe the features and impact of an assistance model involving an intermediate care mobile medical specialist team (GIROT, Gruppo Intervento Rapido Ospedale Territorio) aimed at delivering "hospital-at-nursing home" care to NH residents with COVID-19 in Florence, Italy. METHODS: The GIROT activity was set-up during the first wave of the pandemic (W1, March-April 2020) and became a structured healthcare model during the second (W2, October 2020-January 2021). The activity involved (1) infection transmission control among NHs residents and staff, (2) comprehensive geriatric assessment including prognostication and geriatric syndromes management, (3) on-site diagnostic assessment and protocol-based treatment of COVID-19, (4) supply of nursing personnel to understaffed NHs. To estimate the impact of the GIROT intervention, we reported hospitalization and infection lethality rates recorded in SARS-CoV-2-positive NH residents during W1 and W2. RESULTS: The GIROT activity involved 21 NHs (1159 residents) and 43 NHs (2448 residents) during W1 and W2, respectively. The percentage of infected residents was higher in W2 than in W1 (64.5% vs. 38.8%), while both hospitalization and lethality rates significantly decreased in W2 compared to W1 (10.1% vs 58.2% and 23.4% vs 31.1%, respectively). DISCUSSION: Potentiating on-site care in the NHs paralleled a decrease of hospital admissions with no increase of lethality. CONCLUSIONS: An innovative "hospital-at-nursing home" patient-centred care model based on comprehensive geriatric assessment may provide a valuable contribution in fighting COVID-19 in NH residents.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Aged , Hospitalization , Hospitals , Humans , Nursing Homes , SARS-CoV-2
10.
J Am Med Dir Assoc ; 22(8): 1588-1592.e1, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1293898

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To assess the association of pre-morbid functional status [Barthel Index (BI)] and frailty [modified Frailty Index (mFI)] with in-hospital mortality and a risk scoring system developed for COVID-19 in patients ≥75 years diagnosed with COVID-19. DESIGN: Retrospective bicentric observational study. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: Data on consecutive patients aged ≥75 years admitted with COVID-19 at 2 Italian tertiary care centers were collected from February 22 to May 30, 2020. METHODS: Overall, 221 consecutive patients with COVID-19 aged ≥75 years were admitted to 2 hospitals in the study period and were included in the analysis. Clinical, functional (BI), frailty (mFI), laboratory, and imaging data were collected. Mortality risk on admission was assessed with the COVID-19 Mortality Risk Score (COVID-19 MRS), a dedicated score developed for hospital triage. RESULTS: Ninety-seven (43.9%) patients died. BI, frailty, age, dementia, respiratory rate, Pao2/Fio2 ratio, creatinine, and platelet count were associated with mortality. Analysis of the area under the receiver operating characteristic (AUC) indicated that the predictivity of age was modest and the combination of BI, mFI, and COVID-19 MRS yielded the highest prediction accuracy (AUCCOVID-19MRS+BI+mFI vs AUCAge: 0.87 vs 0.59; difference: +0.28, lower bound-upper bound: 0.17-0.34, P < .001). CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS: Premorbid BI and mFI are associated with mortality and improved the accuracy of the COVID-19 MRS. Functional status may prove useful to guide clinical management of older individuals.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Frailty , Aged , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
11.
Eur Geriatr Med ; 12(4): 725-739, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1241722

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: In the pathogenesis of severe COVID-19 complications, derangements of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS), vascular endothelial dysfunction leading to inflammation and coagulopathy, and arrhythmias play an important role. Therefore, it is worth considering the use of currently available drugs to protect COVID-19 patients with cardiovascular diseases. METHODS: We review the current experience of conventional cardiovascular drugs [angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers, anticoagulants, acetosalicylic acid, antiarrhythmic drugs, statins] as well as some other drug classes (antidiabetic drugs, vitamin D and NSAIDs) frequently used by older patients with cardiovascular diseases. Data were sought from clinical databases for COVID-19 and appropriate key words. Conclusions and recommendations are based on a consensus among all authors. RESULTS: Several cardiovascular drugs have a potential to protect patients with COVID-19, although evidence is largely based on retrospective, observational studies. Despite propensity score adjustments used in many analyses observational studies are not equivalent to randomised controlled trials (RCTs). Ongoing RCTs include treatment with antithrombotics, pulmonary vasodilators, RAAS-related drugs, and colchicine. RCTs in the acute phase of COVID-19 may not, however, recognise the benefits of long term anti-atherogenic therapies, such as statins. CONCLUSIONS: Most current cardiovascular drugs can be safely continued during COVID-19. Some drug classes may even be protective. Age-specific data are scarce, though, and conditions which are common in older patients (frailty, comorbidities, polypharmacy) must be individually considered for each drug group.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiovascular Diseases/drug therapy , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Aged , Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists/therapeutic use , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/therapeutic use , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/drug therapy , Humans , Pandemics , Renin-Angiotensin System/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity
12.
PLoS One ; 16(5): e0251966, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1236594

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to assess the incidence of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) of the lower limbs, using serial compression ultrasound (CUS) surveillance, in acutely ill patients with COVID-19 pneumonia admitted to a non-ICU setting. METHODS: Multicenter, prospective study of patients with COVID-19 pneumonia admitted to Internal Medicine units. All patients were screened for DVT of the lower limbs with serial CUS. Anticoagulation was defined as: low dose (enoxaparin 20-40 mg/day or fondaparinux 1.5-2.5 mg/day); intermediate dose (enoxaparin 60-80 mg/day); high dose (enoxaparin 120-160 mg or fondaparinux 5-10 mg/day or oral anticoagulation). The primary end-point of the study was the diagnosis of DVT by CUS. RESULTS: Over a two-month period, 227 consecutive patients with moderate-severe COVID-19 pneumonia were enrolled. The incidence of DVT was 13.7% (6.2% proximal, 7.5% distal), mostly asymptomatic. All patients received anticoagulation (enoxaparin 95.6%) at the following doses: low 57.3%, intermediate 22.9%, high 19.8%. Patients with and without DVT had similar characteristics, and no difference in anticoagulant regimen was observed. DVT patients were older (mean 77±9.6 vs 71±13.1 years; p = 0.042) and had higher peak D-dimer levels (5403 vs 1723 ng/mL; p = 0.004). At ROC analysis peak D-dimer level >2000 ng/mL (AUC 0.703; 95% CI 0.572-0.834; p = 0.004) was the most accurate cut-off value able to predict DVT (RR 3.74; 95%CI 1.27-10, p = 0.016). CONCLUSIONS: The incidence of DVT in acutely ill patients with COVID-19 pneumonia is relevant. A surveillance protocol by serial CUS of the lower limbs is useful to timely identify DVT that would go otherwise largely undetected.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , Venous Thrombosis/epidemiology , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , Enoxaparin/therapeutic use , Female , Fondaparinux/therapeutic use , Humans , Incidence , Lower Extremity/blood supply , Male , Middle Aged , Ultrasonography , Venous Thrombosis/diagnostic imaging , Venous Thrombosis/drug therapy , Venous Thrombosis/etiology
13.
J Am Med Dir Assoc ; 21(12): 1803-1807, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-866830

ABSTRACT

Because of the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, we were forced to cancel scheduled visits for nearly 150 patients followed in our heart failure (HF) outpatient clinic. Therefore, we structured a telephone follow-up, developing a standardized 23-item questionnaire from which we obtained the Covid-19-HF score. The questionnaire was built to reproduce our usual clinical evaluation investigating a patient's social and functional condition, mood, adherence to pharmacological and nonpharmacological recommendations, clinical and hemodynamic status, pharmacological treatment, and need to contact emergency services. The score was used as a clinical tool to define patients' clinical stability and timing of the following telephone contact on the basis of the assignment to progressively increasing risk score groups: green (0-3), yellow (4-8), and red (≥9). Here we present our experience applying the score in the first 30 patients who completed the 4-week follow-up, describing baseline clinical characteristics and events that occurred in the period of observation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Heart Failure , Telemedicine , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Ambulatory Care Facilities , Chronic Disease , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
14.
BMJ Open ; 10(9): e040729, 2020 09 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-797443

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Several physiological abnormalities that develop during COVID-19 are associated with increased mortality. In the present study, we aimed to develop a clinical risk score to predict the in-hospital mortality in COVID-19 patients, based on a set of variables available soon after the hospitalisation triage. SETTING: Retrospective cohort study of 516 patients consecutively admitted for COVID-19 to two Italian tertiary hospitals located in Northern and Central Italy were collected from 22 February 2020 (date of first admission) to 10 April 2020. PARTICIPANTS: Consecutive patients≥18 years admitted for COVID-19. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Simple clinical and laboratory findings readily available after triage were compared by patients' survival status ('dead' vs 'alive'), with the objective of identifying baseline variables associated with mortality. These were used to build a COVID-19 in-hospital mortality risk score (COVID-19MRS). RESULTS: Mean age was 67±13 years (mean±SD), and 66.9% were male. Using Cox regression analysis, tertiles of increasing age (≥75, upper vs <62 years, lower: HR 7.92; p<0.001) and number of chronic diseases (≥4 vs 0-1: HR 2.09; p=0.007), respiratory rate (HR 1.04 per unit increase; p=0.001), PaO2/FiO2 (HR 0.995 per unit increase; p<0.001), serum creatinine (HR 1.34 per unit increase; p<0.001) and platelet count (HR 0.995 per unit increase; p=0.001) were predictors of mortality. All six predictors were used to build the COVID-19MRS (Area Under the Curve 0.90, 95% CI 0.87 to 0.93), which proved to be highly accurate in stratifying patients at low, intermediate and high risk of in-hospital death (p<0.001). CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19MRS is a rapid, operator-independent and inexpensive clinical tool that objectively predicts mortality in patients with COVID-19. The score could be helpful from triage to guide earlier assignment of COVID-19 patients to the most appropriate level of care.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Coronavirus Infections , Critical Care , Critical Pathways , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Risk Assessment/methods , Triage , Aged , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Critical Care/methods , Critical Care/statistics & numerical data , Critical Pathways/organization & administration , Critical Pathways/standards , Female , Hospital Mortality , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Prognosis , Respiration, Artificial/statistics & numerical data , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Triage/methods , Triage/statistics & numerical data
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL