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1.
Front Psychiatry ; 12: 657021, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1542380

ABSTRACT

Background: Health professionals including nurses have experienced heavy workload and great physical and mental health challenges during the coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19) pandemic, which may affect nursing students' career choices. This study examined the changes in nursing students' career choices after the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic in China. Methods: This study was conducted in five University nursing schools in China between September 14, 2020 and October 7, 2020. Career choices before and after the COVID-19 pandemic were collected and analyzed. Results: In total, 1,070 nursing students participated in the study. The reported choice of nursing as future career increased from 50.9% [95% confidence interval (CI): 47.9-53.9%] before the COVID-19 pandemic to 62.7% (95%CI: 59.8-65.6%) after the onset of COVID-19 pandemic. Students who chose nursing as their future career following the COVID-19 outbreak had less severe depression and anxiety compared to those who did not choose nursing, but the associations of depression and anxiety with career choice disappeared in multivariable analyses. Binary logistic regression analysis revealed that male gender [odds ratio (OR) = 0.68, 95% CI: 0.50-0.91], rural residence (OR = 1.53, 95%CI: 1.17-2.00), fourth year students (OR = 0.50, 95%CI: 0.35-0.72), negative experiences during the COVID-19 pandemic (OR = 0.66, 95%CI: 0.47-0.92), and good health (OR = 4.6, 95%CI: 1.78-11.87) were significantly associated with the choice of nursing as future career after the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic. Conclusions: The COVID-19 pandemic appeared to have a positive influence on the career choice of nursing among Chinese nursing students.

2.
PeerJ ; 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1534525

ABSTRACT

Background Frontline clinicians working in emergency departments (ED) were at disportionate risk of workplace violence (WPV). We investigated the prevalence of WPV and its relationship with quality of life (QOL) in this group of health professionals in China during the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods A cross-sectional, online study was conducted. The nine-item Workplace Violence Scale measured WPV. Results A total of 1,103 ED clinicians participated in this study. The overall prevalence of WPV against ED clinicians was 29.2% (95% CI [26.5%-31.9%]). Having family/friends/colleagues infected with COVID-19 (Odds Ratio (OR) = 1.82, P = 0.01), current smoking (OR = 2.98, P < 0.01) and severity of anxiety symptoms (OR = 1.08, P < 0.01) were independently and positively associated with WPV, while working in emergency intensive care units (OR = 0.45, P < 0.01) was negatively associated with WPV. After controlling for covariates, clinicians experiencing WPV had a lower global QOL compared to those without (F(1, 1103) = 10.9,P < 0.01). Conclusions Prevalence of workplace violence against ED clinicians was common in China during the COVID-19 pandemic. Due to the negative impact of WPV on QOL and quality of care, timely preventive measures should be undertaken for ED clinicians.

3.
PeerJ ; 9: e12223, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1515636

ABSTRACT

Background: The outbreak of the 2019 coronavirus disease outbreak (COVID-19) had a detrimental impact on adolescents' daily life and studying, which could increase the risk of depression. This study examined the prevalence of depressive symptoms (depression hereafter) among Chinese adolescents and its associated factors. Methods: An online survey was conducted during the COVID-19 outbreak in China. Adolescents aged 11-20 years who currently lived in China were invited to participate in the study. Data were collected with the "SurveyStar" platform using the Snowball Sampling method. Depression was assessed using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D). Results: A total of 9,554 adolescents participated in the study. The prevalence of depression was 36.6% (95% CI [35.6%-37.6%]); the prevalence of mild and moderate-severe depression was 9.2% (95% CI [8.9%-9.5%]) and 27.4% (95% CI [26.9%-27.9%]), respectively. Female gender (OR = 1.235, P < 0.001), senior secondary school grade (OR = 1.513, P < 0.001), sleep duration of <6 h/day (OR = 2.455, P < 0.001), and living in Hubei province (total number of infected cases > 10,000) (OR = 1.245, P = 0.038) were significantly associated with higher risk of depression. Concern about COVID-19 (OR = 0.632, P < 0.001), participating in distance learning (OR = 0.728, P = 0.001), sleep duration of >8 h/day (OR = 0.726, P < 0.001), exercise of >30 min/day, and study duration of ≥4 h/day (OR = 0.835, P < 0.001) were associated with lower risk of depression. Conclusion: Depression was common among adolescents in China during the COVID-19 outbreak. Considering the negative impact of depression on daily life and health outcomes, timely screening and appropriate interventions are urgently needed for depressed adolescents during the COVID-19 outbreak.

4.
Am J Addict ; 30(6): 585-592, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1416264

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The prevalence of problematic Internet use (PIU) in the post-COVID-19 pandemic era is not known. This cross-sectional study aimed to determine the prevalence of PIU among baccalaureate nursing students (hereafter: nursing students) in the post-COVID-19 era. METHODS: A total of 1070 nursing students were consecutively invited to participate in this study from the nursing schools of five universities. PIU and quality of life (QOL) were assessed using the Internet Addiction Test (IAT) and the World Health Organization Quality of Life Scale Brief Version (WHOQOL-BREF), respectively. t Tests, χ2 , tests, and Kruskal-Wallis tests were used to compare basic demographic and clinical characteristics between participants with and without PIU. Binary logistic regression analysis was used to examine independent correlates. RESULTS: The prevalence of PIU was 23.3% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 20.7%-25.8%). Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that second- (p = .024) and third-year (p = .012) students were more likely to suffer from PIU compared with first year students. Students with more severe depressive (p = .014) and anxiety symptoms (p = .011) were independently and significantly associated with more severe PIU. After controlling for covariates, nursing students with PIU had a lower overall QOL score (p = .002). CONCLUSION AND SCIENTIFIC SIGNIFICANCE: Problematic Internet use (PIU) was common among nursing students in the post-COVID-19 era. Considering the negative impact of PIU on QOL and academic performance, regular screening should be conducted and effective interventions implemented for nursing students with PIU. This was the first study on the prevalence of PIU among nursing students in the post-COVID-19 era. The findings of this study could help health professionals and education authorities to understand the patterns of PIU and its influence on QOL among nursing students and to allocate health resources and develop effective measures to reduce the risk of PIU in this population.


Subject(s)
Behavior, Addictive , COVID-19 , Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate , Students, Nursing , Behavior, Addictive/epidemiology , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Internet , Internet Use , Pandemics , Prevalence , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2
5.
Front Psychiatry ; 12: 678917, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1325577

ABSTRACT

Background: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has caused psychological distress and heavy burden in medical professionals. This study examined the prevalence of fatigue and its association with quality of life (QOL) in clinicians working in ophthalmology and otolaryngology departments during the COVID-19 pandemic in China. Methods: This was a cross-sectional national online survey conducted between March 15 and March 20, 2020 in China. The severity of fatigue, depression and QOL were measured using the Numeric Rating Scale (NRS), the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9), and the World Health Organization Quality of Life Questionnaire-Brief Version (WHOQOL-BREF), respectively. Results: In total, 3,912 clinicians completed the survey (2,155 in ophthalmology department, and 1,757 in otolaryngology department); 2,049 [52.4%; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 50.8-53.9%] reported fatigue (NRS score ≥ 4). Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that junior clinicians [Odds ratio (OR) = 0.82, 95% CI = 0.68-1.00, P = 0.045] had lower risk of fatigue; while clinicians working in tertiary hospitals (OR = 1.23, 95% CI = 1.02-1.49, P = 0.029), and the presence of more severe depressive symptoms (PHQ-9 total score ≥ 5; OR = 7.40, 95% CI = 6.29-8.70, P < 0.001) were independently associated with higher risk of fatigue. After controlling for covariates, clinicians with fatigue had significantly lower QOL compared with those without [F (1, 3, 911) = 283.75, P < 0.001]. Conclusion: Fatigue was common in clinicians working in ophthalmology and otolaryngology departments during the COVID-19 pandemic. Considering the negative impact of fatigue on clinicians' QOL, health authorities and policymakers should conduct regular screening for fatigue and develop preventive strategies for frontline clinicians working under excessive stress.

6.
Front Psychiatry ; 12: 649989, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1211874

ABSTRACT

Background: Workplace violence is a major concern for clinicians worldwide. There has been little data on the epidemiology of workplace violence against frontline clinicians during the COVID-19 pandemic. This study examined the pattern of workplace violence and its association with quality of life (QOL) against frontline clinicians during the outbreak of COVID-19 pandemic in China. Methods: A cross-sectional online study was conducted in China between March 15 and March 20, 2020. Frontline clinicians' experience with workplace violence was measured with six standardized questions derived from the Workplace Violence Scale, while anxiety, depressive, and insomnia symptoms, and QOL were measured using the General Anxiety Disorder Questionnaire, the Patient Health Questionnaire, the Insomnia Severity Index, and the World Health Organization Quality of Life Questionnaire, respectively. Univariate analyses, multivariable logistic regression analyses, and structural equation modeling (SEM) were conducted. Results: A total of 15,531 clinicians completed the assessment; 2,878 (18.5, 95% CI = 17.92-19.14%) reported workplace violence during the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic (verbal violence: 16.1%; physical violence: 6.9%). According to multivariable models, key correlates of workplace violence were male gender, longer work experience, higher education level, smoking, working in the psychiatry or emergency department, working in tertiary hospitals, being involved in direct care of infected patients, having infected family/ friends/ colleagues, and frequently using social communication programs. Clinicians working in inpatient departments were less likely to report workplace violence compared to those working in outpatient departments. SEM analysis revealed that both violence and emotional disturbances (anxiety, depression, and insomnia) directly affected QOL (standardized direct effect = -0.031, and -0.566, respectively, P < 0.05), while emotional disturbances partly mediated the association between work violence and QOL (standardized indirect effect = -0.184, P < 0.05). Conclusion: Frontline clinicians were vulnerable to workplace violence during the COVID-19 pandemic. Due to the negative impact of workplace violence on quality of care and clinicians' QOL, health authorities and policymakers should take effective measures to reduce workplace violence against clinicians.

7.
PeerJ ; 9: e11037, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1200332

ABSTRACT

Objective: Exposure to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) was associated with high risk of mental health problems among frontline nurses. This study examined the prevalence of depressive symptoms (depression hereafter) and its impact on quality of life (QOL) in otorhinolaryngology (ENT) nurses during the COVID-19 pandemic in China. Methods: An online study was conducted between March 15 and March 20, 2020. Depression and QOL were assessed using standardized instruments. Results: A total of 1,757 participants were recruited. The prevalence of depression was 33.75% (95% CI: 31.59%-35.97%). Results emerging from multiple logistic regression analysis showed that direct care of COVID-19 patients (OR: 1.441, 95% CI: 1.031-2.013, P = 0.032), and current smoking (OR: 2.880, 95% CI: 1.018-8.979, P = 0.048) were significantly associated with depression. After controlling for covariates, ENT nurses with depression had a lower overall QOL compared to those without depression (F(1, 1757)= 536.80, P < 0.001). Conclusions: Depression was common among ENT nurses during the COVID-19 pandemic in China. Considering the negative impact of depression on QOL and care quality, regular screening for depression should be conducted in ENT nurses and treatment should be provided.

8.
Transl Psychiatry ; 11(1): 75, 2021 01 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1049959

ABSTRACT

The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on clinically stable older patients with psychiatric disorders is unclear. This study examined the prevalence of depressive and anxiety symptoms, and their associations with quality of life (QOL) in clinically stable older patients with psychiatric disorders during the COVID-19 pandemic. This was a multicenter, cross-sectional study. Depressive and anxiety symptoms, insomnia, pain, and QOL were assessed with standardized instruments. A total of 1063 patients were included. The prevalence of depressive and anxiety symptoms, and combined depressive and anxiety symptoms were 62.3% (95%CI = 59.4-65.2%), 52.4% (95%CI = 49.3-55.4%), and 45.9% (95%CI = 42.9-48.9%), respectively. Patients with depressive and anxiety symptoms had significantly lower QOL than those without (P < 0.01). Binary logistic regression analyses revealed that having depressive symptoms was positively associated with more severe insomnia (OR = 1.29, P < 0.01) and pain (OR = 1.14, P < 0.01), and was negatively associated with other psychiatric diagnoses (except for major depressive disorder, schizophrenia, and organic mental disorder; OR = 0.50, P < 0.01), while having anxiety symptoms was positively associated with severe physical diseases (OR = 1.57, P = 0.02), poor adherence to treatment (OR = 1.50, P < 0.01), and more severe insomnia (OR = 1.15, P < 0.01) and pain (OR = 1.11, P < 0.01). Having combined depression and anxiety symptoms was positively associated with poor adherence to treatment (OR = 1.42, P = 0.02) and more severe insomnia (OR = 1.19, P < 0.01) and pain (OR = 1.15, P < 0.01), and was negatively associated with the diagnosis of schizophrenia (OR = 0.50, P = 0.04) and others (OR = 0.53, P < 0.01). Depressive and anxiety symptoms were common in clinically stable older patients with psychiatric disorders during the COVID-19 pandemic. Considering the negative impact of these symptoms on QOL, regular screening and appropriate treatment are recommended for this population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Pain/epidemiology , Quality of Life , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , Treatment Adherence and Compliance/statistics & numerical data , Aged , China/epidemiology , Comorbidity , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prevalence , Severity of Illness Index
9.
Global Health ; 16(1): 119, 2020 12 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-992508

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The pattern of fatigue in older psychiatric patients during the COVID-19 outbreak was unknown. This study examined the prevalence of fatigue and its association with overall quality of life (overall QOL) in clinically stable older patients with psychiatric disorders during the COVID-19 outbreak. METHODS: This was a multicenter, cross-sectional study. Fatigue, depressive symptoms, pain, insomnia symptoms, and overall QOL were assessed with standardized instruments. RESULTS: A total of 1063 patients were recruited. The prevalence of fatigue was 47.1% (95%CI: 44.1-50.1%). An analysis of covariance revealed that overall QOL was significantly lower in patients with fatigue compared to those without (P = 0.011). A multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that more severe depressive symptoms (OR = 1.15, P < 0.001), insomnia symptoms (OR = 1.08, P < 0.001) and pain (OR = 1.43, P < 0.001) were significantly associated with fatigue. CONCLUSIONS: Fatigue is common among clinically stable older patients with psychiatric disorders during the COVID-19 outbreak. Considering its negative impact on overall QOL, regular assessment of fatigue and appropriate treatment warrant attention in this subpopulation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Fatigue/complications , Mental Disorders/complications , Pain/complications , Quality of Life , Severity of Illness Index , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/complications , Age Factors , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/complications , Depression/epidemiology , Depressive Disorder/complications , Depressive Disorder/epidemiology , Disease Outbreaks , Fatigue/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Logistic Models , Male , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Middle Aged , Pain/epidemiology , Prevalence , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , Social Isolation/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires
10.
J Affect Disord ; 276: 312-315, 2020 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-653701

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Frontline medical staff exposed to the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) could be psychologically and mentally exhausted. This study examined the prevalence of depressive symptoms (depression hereafter) and their correlates and the association between depression and quality of life (QOL) in Emergency Department (ED) nurses during the COVID-19 pandemic in China. METHODS: This national, cross-sectional online survey was conducted between March 15 and March 20, 2020 in China. Depression and QOL were measured using the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire, and the World Health Organization Quality of Life Questionnaire-Brief Version, respectively. RESULTS: The overall prevalence of depression in 1103 ED nurses was 43.61% (95% CI=40.68-46.54%). Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that working in tertiary hospitals (OR=1.647, P=0.009), direct patient care of COVID-19 patients (OR=1.421, P=0.018), and current smokers (OR=3.843, P<0.001) were significantly associated with depression. After controlling for covariates, nurses with depression had an overall lower QOL compared to those without (F(1,1103)=423.83, P<0.001). CONCLUSION: Depression was common among ED nurses during the COVID-19 pandemic. Considering the negative impact of depression on quality of patient care and nurses' QOL, a heightened awareness of, and early treatment for depression for frontline ED nurses should be provided.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections , Depression/epidemiology , Nurses , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Adult , COVID-19 , Cross-Sectional Studies , Disease Outbreaks , Emergency Service, Hospital , Female , Humans , Male , Nurses/psychology , Prevalence , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
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