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1.
Prim Care Companion CNS Disord ; 24(3)2022 May 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1875893

ABSTRACT

Objective: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccination uptake among individuals with severe mental illness (SMI) is a public health challenge due to various individual level as well as systemic level barriers. The objective of this study was to explore COVID-19 vaccination status among community-dwelling patients with SMI and identify associated factors.Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among patients with SMI attending community psychiatry clinics in Northern Kerala from April 21, 2021, to August 3, 2021, using a structured questionnaire. Sociodemographic information and COVID-19-related information, including vaccination status and agreement with COVID-19 vaccination-related statements, were obtained.Results: Of the 62 respondents, only 27.9% received COVID-19 vaccination. Also, 59.7% of respondents received a recommendation for vaccination from their health care providers. The mean age of the vaccinated group was significantly higher than that of the unvaccinated group (F = 1.3359, P < .001). The rate of vaccination uptake among respondents who were contacted by their health care provider for COVID-19 vaccination was significantly higher (P = .001). Respondents in the vaccinated group perceived the vaccine to be more effective in preventing COVID-19 infection than those in the unvaccinated group (2.06 vs 2.64, P = .031). Also, vaccinated respondents were less in agreement regarding the statement about the risk of COVID-19 vaccine worsening mental illness (4.18 vs 3.67, P = .049). Age and recommendation for vaccination from health care providers were found to be significant predictors of COVID-19 vaccination uptake.Conclusions: On the basis of the study findings, it is recommended that tailored educational activities regarding the safety and efficacy of the COVID-19 vaccine along with recommendation by health care providers can significantly improve COVID-19 vaccination uptake among patients with SMI.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Influenza Vaccines , Mental Disorders , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines , Cross-Sectional Studies , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Independent Living , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Vaccination
2.
Prim Care Companion CNS Disord ; 24(3)2022 May 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1835048

ABSTRACT

Objective: A range of psychiatric morbidities such as persistent depression, anxiety, insomnia, and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has been observed in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) survivors. The objective of this study was to explore the psychological status of health care workers after recovery from COVID-19 and to examine the sociodemographic and clinical factors associated with psychiatric morbidity.Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among health care workers of a tertiary care hospital in South India. The study included health care workers who tested positive for COVID-19 according to the provisional guidelines of the World Health Organization. The data were collected after they tested negative for COVID-19 from September 2020 to October 2020. The study used a semistructured proforma and rating scales such as the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire, 7-item Generalized Anxiety Disorder Scale, and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist for DSM-5 to assess for depression, anxiety, and PTSD.Results: The results indicate that the prevalence of depression, anxiety, and PTSD among 107 post-COVID patients was 26.2%%, 12.1%, and 3.7%%, respectively. Female sex (P = .017), patients with post-COVID persistent physical symptoms (P = .05), and the duration of fever during the acute phase of COVID-19 infection (P = .005) were found to have a statistically significant association with a higher rate of depression among the study population.Conclusions: The study findings indicate that all COVID-19 survivors working in the health care sector should be screened for depression and anxiety disorders regularly for early detection and effective management.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/etiology , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/psychology , Female , Health Personnel/psychology , Humans , Morbidity , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/etiology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/psychology , Survivors/psychology
3.
Indian J Psychol Med ; 44(1): 102-103, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1825328
4.
Prim Care Companion CNS Disord ; 24(1)2022 02 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1700178
5.
Prim Care Companion CNS Disord ; 24(1)2022 02 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1674971
6.
Prim Care Companion CNS Disord ; 24(1)2021 12 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1598879
7.
Prim Care Companion CNS Disord ; 23(6)2021 12 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1566715
8.
Prim Care Companion CNS Disord ; 23(6)2021 Dec 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1551701
10.
Anatolian Journal of Family Medicine ; 4(2):187-189, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1497734

ABSTRACT

Although the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in the pediatric population appears to be less severe among children <18 years old, emerging evidence from Europe, North America, Asia, and Latin America indicates that COVID-19 infection may precipitate the hyperinflammatory state among children following infection. This paper reports a case of multisystem inflammatory syndrome with features of incomplete Kawasaki disease in an adolescent boy who also tested positive for COVID-19 antibody. This case highlights the potential COVID-19 complications in adolescents. © 2021 Asociacion Espanola de Dietistas-Nutricionistas. All rights reserved.

11.
Prim Care Companion CNS Disord ; 23(6)2021 10 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1497475
12.
Prim Care Companion CNS Disord ; 23(5)2021 10 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1485267
13.
Asian J Psychiatr ; 66: 102892, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1471468
14.
Chronobiology in Medicine ; 3(3):102-106, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1471337

ABSTRACT

Objective: Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) infection predisposes patients to various psychiatric disorders. Study results indicate significantly higher prevalence of insomnia among patients with COVID-19 during active phase. Acute insomnia during active phase of COVID-19 can persist even after recovery, and can transform into chronic insomnia. There are not many studies exploring insomnia among COVID-19 survivors. Our study aims to explore insomnia and its correlation among healthcare workers with confirmed infection of COVID-19 after recovery. Methods: One hundred and seven COVID-19 survivors participated in the study. The social demographic and clinical information of all participants was collected by a structured self report questionnaire. Insomnia was evaluated using the Insomnia Severity Index. Results: The prevalence of insomnia was 21.5% among the healthcare workers with confirmed COVID-19 infection after recovery. There were significant positive correlation between the duration of fever and insomnia severity (0.247, p=0.01). Conclusion: Our study among healthcare workers recovered from COVID-19 provides evidence for high prevalence of insomnia among COVID-19 survivors. The results of this study demands that specific support measures should be planned and implemented to address insomnia among healthcare workers recovered from COVID-19. © 2021 Korean Academy of Sleep Medicine.

15.
Eur J Psychiatry ; 36(2): 140-141, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1439998
20.
Prim Care Companion CNS Disord ; 23(2)2021 03 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1231534

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the prevalence of depression, anxiety, and insomnia among hospital staff working in a tertiary care private hospital in India during the early period of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. METHODS: This cross-sectional study was conducted May 5-25, 2020, among 347 hospital staff (nursing and other hospital staff, with the exception of doctors). Depression, anxiety, and insomnia were measured using the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire, the 7-item Generalized Anxiety Disorder Scale, and the Insomnia Severity Index, respectively. RESULTS: Of respondents, 16.4% reported clinically significant depression, 13.8% reported clinically significant anxiety, and 13.3% reported insomnia. Among the nursing staff, 20.9% reported clinically significant depression, 15.9% reported clinically significant anxiety, and 17.0% reported insomnia. There was significantly higher depression (P = .000), anxiety (P = .002), and insomnia (P = .007) among nursing staff compared with other hospital staff in 2-tailed t tests. There was a significantly higher prevalence of insomnia among females (χ2 = 5.85, df = 2, P = .05). CONCLUSIONS: Study results show that more than 1 in 10 hospital staff suffer from mental health conditions, even during the beginning of the pandemic, and there is a need for active psychiatric support for the hospital staff during this pandemic. Depression, anxiety, and insomnia are significantly higher among nurses compared to other hospital staff. The results of this research suggest that comprehensive support measures should be implemented to protect and maintain mental health of hospital staff, especially nurses, while fighting the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Anxiety Disorders/epidemiology , COVID-19 , Depressive Disorder/epidemiology , Hospitals, Private/statistics & numerical data , Personnel, Hospital/psychology , Personnel, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , Tertiary Care Centers/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , India/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Nursing Staff, Hospital/statistics & numerical data
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