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1.
BMC Psychiatry ; 23(1): 408, 2023 06 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20241220

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To determine the association between internet addiction disorder (IAD) and anxiety and depressive symptomatology in high school students in two private schools in Chiclayo, Peru, during the COVID-19 pandemic. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Analytical cross-sectional investigation of 505 adolescents from two private schools. The dependent variables were anxiety and depressive symptomatology, measured with the Beck Adapted Depression Questionnaire (BDI-IIA) and the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), respectively. The main independent variable was IAD, measured with the Internet Addiction Test instrument(IATI). Prevalence ratios (PR) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) were estimated. RESULTS: The average age was 14.16 years and 54.9% were women. 22.2% and 3.2% presented mild and moderate IAD; respectively. 9.3% presented severe anxiety and 34.3% severe depressive symptomatology. In the simple regression, adolescents with mild, moderate and severe IAD presented 19% (PR = 1.19; 95%CI: 1.05-1.35), 25% (PR = 1.25; 95%CI: 1.02-1.53) and 53% (PR = 1.47; 95% CI: 1.47-1.60) higher prevalence of depressive symptomatology; however, this association was not maintained in the multiple model. Anxiety increased 196% in adolescents with severe IAD (PR = 2.96; 95%CI: 1.86-4.71). CONCLUSION: We found that 2, 1, and 3 out of 10 students presented IAD, depressive symptomatology, and anxiety, respectively. We did not find an association between IAD and depressive symptomatology, but we did find an association with anxiety. Among the factors associated with the development of depressive symptomatology were the male sex, the presence of eating disorders, subclinical insomnia, using devices for more than 2 h, and using the Internet for academic activities. About anxiety, the associated factors are the female sex, the presence of eating disorders, subclinical insomnia, and the use of the Internet as social interaction. We recommend implementing counseling programs in view of the imminent introduction of the Internet as a pillar in education.


Subject(s)
Behavior, Addictive , COVID-19 , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders , Adolescent , Humans , Male , Female , Cross-Sectional Studies , Internet Addiction Disorder/epidemiology , Peru/epidemiology , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , Mental Health , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Students/psychology , Internet , Behavior, Addictive/epidemiology , Behavior, Addictive/psychology , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/psychology
2.
BMC Public Health ; 23(1): 691, 2023 04 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2305112

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the COVID-19 pandemic, increased workload and stress could have increased mental health problems (anxiety and depression) in military personnel. However, the number of studies in military members is scarce, especially in regard to mental health. The objective of this study was determine the prevalence and factors associated with depression and anxiety in Peruvian military personnel. METHODS: We undertook an analytical cross-sectional study. The survey was distributed face to face between November 02 and 09, 2021, during the second wave of the COVID-19 pandemic among the military personnel. We used some instruments to measure depression (Patient Health Questionnaire, PHQ-9), anxiety (Generalized Anxiety Disorder, GAD-7), insomnia (Insomnia Severity Index, ISI), food insecurity (Household Food Insecurity Access Scale, HFIAS), physical activity (International Physical Activity Questionnaires, IPAQ-S), resilience (abbreviated CD-RISC), and fear of COVID-19 scale. The exclusion criteria included those who did not completely fill out the evaluation instruments. RESULTS: We analyzed the data of 615 military personnel that participated in the survey. Of them, 93.7% were male and the median age was 22 years old. There was a prevalence of 29.9% and 22.0% in regard to depression and anxiety symptoms, respectively. In addition, it was found that being married (PR: 0.63; 95% IC: 0.42-0.94), having a relative with mental health problems (PR: 2.16), having experienced food insecurity (PR: 1.48), insomnia (PR: 2.71), fear of COVID-19 (PR: 1.48), and a high level of resilience (PR: 0.65) were factors associated with depression. In regard to anxiety, the factors associated were working for more than 18 months since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic (PR: 0.52), a high level of resilience (PR: 0.50; 95% IC: 0.33-0.77), insomnia (PR: 3.32), fear of COVID-19 (PR: 2.43). CONCLUSION: We found a prevalence of symptoms of depression and anxiety of 29.9% and 22.0%, respectively. In regard to the factors that attenuate depression, we can mention being married and having resilience; and among the aggravating factors, having a relative with mental health problems, food insecurity, insomnia, and fear of COVID-19. Finally, anxiety increased through working time, insomnia, and fear of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Military Personnel , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders , Humans , Male , Young Adult , Adult , Female , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/psychology , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , Peru/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology , Anxiety Disorders/epidemiology
3.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(4)2023 Feb 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2225211

ABSTRACT

Few studies have evaluated eating disorders in military personnel engaged in defense activities during the COVID-19 pandemic. We aimed to determine the prevalence and factors associated with eating disorders in military personnel from Lambayeque, Peru. A secondary data analysis was performed among 510 military personnel during the second epidemic wave of COVID-19 in Peru. We used the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26) to assess eating disorders. We explored associations with insomnia, food insecurity, physical activity, resilience, fear to COVID-19, burnout syndrome, anxiety, depression, post-traumatic stress and selected sociodemographic variables. Eating disorders were experienced by 10.2% of participants. A higher prevalence of eating disorders was associated with having 7 to 12 months (PR: 2.97; 95% CI: 1.24-7.11) and 19 months or more (PR: 2.62; 95% CI: 1.11-6.17) working in the first line of defense against COVID-19, fear of COVID-19 (PR: 2.20; 95% CI: 1.26-3.85), burnout syndrome (PR: 3.73; 95% CI: 1.90-7.33) and post-traumatic stress (PR: 2.97; 95% CI: 1.13-7.83). A low prevalence of eating disorders was found in the military personnel. However, prevention of this problem should be focused on at-risk groups that experience mental health burdens.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Feeding and Eating Disorders , Military Personnel , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Military Personnel/psychology , Pandemics , Prevalence , Peru , Depression/epidemiology , Anxiety/epidemiology , Feeding and Eating Disorders/epidemiology
4.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(20)2022 Oct 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2082301

ABSTRACT

There is scant evidence on the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on burnout in front-line military personnel and how working time may influence on this condition. We aimed to determine the association between working time and Burnout syndrome in military personnel. A cross-sectional study was conducted using secondary data among 576 military personnel from Lambayeque, Peru during the second wave of COVID-19 in 2021. We used the Maslach Burnout Inventory instrument to measure Burnout Syndrome. We evaluated its association with work time, measured as the number of months that the military member worked during the pandemic. The prevalence of burnout syndrome was 9%. Of the total sample, 39.1% and 10.3% presented depersonalization and emotional exhaustion, respectively. Military personnel working for more than 18 months had a 104% higher prevalence of Burnout syndrome (PR: 2.04, 95%CI: 1.02-4.10). Exposure to a prolonged work time during the pandemic increased the prevalence of Burnout syndrome in military personnel. This information helps to understand the potential effects of the pandemic on this population and provides insight into the time the military members would need rest to prevent Burnout syndrome.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Military Personnel , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Military Personnel/psychology , Pandemics , Peru/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Surveys and Questionnaires , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology
5.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(17)2022 Sep 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2010048

ABSTRACT

Greater occupational exposure may have a positive effect on the development of resilience. We aimed to determine the association between working time and resilience in Peruvian military personnel during the COVID-19 pandemic. A secondary data analysis was performed including 586 records of military personnel who supported the health emergency during the second epidemic wave in Lambayeque, Peru. Resilience was measured with the short form of the Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale (CD-RISC). Working time and other relevant covariates were collected by self-report. Generalized linear models were used. The mean resilience score was 22.18 and 43.2% scored high for resilience. Participants reported that they are strong individuals when facing difficulties (42.3%), are able to handle unpleasant feelings (40.3%), and achieve their goals despite obstacles (40.4%). Working more than 18 months was associated with a 35% higher prevalence of high resilience (PR: 1.35; 95% CI: 1.05-1.75). In conclusion, a notable number of military personnel experienced high levels of resilience during the pandemic. Working time may have played an important role in the development of this ability. Our findings could help guide the deployment and organization of the military in health emergency support missions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Military Personnel , Resilience, Psychological , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Pandemics , Peru/epidemiology
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