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1.
Res Pract Thromb Haemost ; 6(3): e12683, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1772842

ABSTRACT

Background: Venous thromboembolism (VTE) frequently occurs in hospitalized patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). The optimal dose of anticoagulation for thromboprophylaxis in COVID-19 is unknown. Aims: To report VTE incidence and bleeding before and after implementing a hospital-wide intensified thromboprophylactic protocol in patients with COVID-19. Methods: On March 31, 2020, we implemented an intensified thromboprophylactic protocol consisting of 50 IU anti-Xa low molecular weight heparin (LMWH)/kg once daily at the ward, twice daily at the intensive care unit (ICU). We included all patients hospitalized in a tertiary care hospital with symptomatic COVID-19 between March 7 and July 1, 2020. The primary outcome was the incidence of symptomatic or subclinical VTE and major bleeding during admission. Routine ultrasound screening for VTE was performed whenever logistically possible. Results: We included 412 patients, of which 116 were admitted to the ICU. Of 219 patients with standard a prophylactic dose of LMWH, 16 (7.3%) had VTE, 10 of which were symptomatic (4.6%). Of 193 patients with intensified thromboprophylaxis, there were no symptomatic VTE cases, three incidental deep venous thrombosis cases (1.6%), and one incidental pulmonary embolism (0.5%). The major bleeding rate was 1.2% in patients with intensified thromboprophylaxis and 7.7% when therapeutic anticoagulation was needed. Conclusion: In hospitalized patients with COVID-19, there were no additional symptomatic VTEs and a reduction in incidental deep vein thrombosis after implementing systematic thromboprophylaxis with weight-adjusted prophylactic (ward) to intermediate (ICU), but not therapeutic dosed anticoagulation. This intensified thromboprophylaxis was associated with a lower risk of major bleeding compared with therapeutic dosed anticoagulation.

2.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-315433

ABSTRACT

Background: Drug repurposing is an attractive strategy to rapidly develop affordable therapy against COVID-19. The antifungal drug itraconazole exerts in vitro activity against SARS-CoV-2 comparable to that of hydroxychloroquine. Preclinical and clinical studies are required to investigate if itraconazole is effective for the treatment and/or prevention of COVID-19. Methods: Due to the initial absence of preclinical models the effect of itraconazole was explored in a clinical, proof-of-concept, open-label, single-center study, in which hospitalized patients with COVID-19 were randomly assigned to receive standard of care with or without itraconazole. The primary outcome was the cumulative score of the clinical status until day 15 based on the 7-point ordinal scale of the World Health Organization. Other outcomes included time to sustained clinical improvement, duration of supplemental oxygen and evolution of nasopharyngeal viral load. In parallel, itraconazole was evaluated in a newly established hamster model of acute SARS-CoV-2 infection and transmission, as soon as the model was validated. Findings: In the hamster acute infection model, itraconazole did not reduce viral load in lungs, stools or ileum, despite adequate plasma and lung drug concentrations. In the transmission model, itraconazole failed to prevent viral transmission. The clinical trial was prematurely discontinued after evaluation of the preclinical studies and interim analysis that showed no trends for a more favorable outcome with itraconazole: mean cumulative score of the clinical status 49 vs 47, ratio of geometric means 1.01 (95% CI 0.85 to 1.19), median time to clinical improvement 10 vs 9 days, hazard ratio 0.94 (95% CI 0.56 to 1.60) for itraconazole vs standard of care. Interpretation: Despite in vitro activity, itraconazole was not effective in a preclinical COVID-19 hamster model. A proof-of-concept clinical study was ended prematurely because of futility. Trial Registration: (EudraCT 2020-001243-15)Funding: Covid-19-Fund KU Leuven, Research Foundation - Flanders (FWO), Horizon 2020, Bill and Melinda Gates FoundationDeclaration of Interests: Initial dug screening and discovery of the antiviral effect of itraconazole was done in collaboration with Johnson & Johnson and described in a separate manuscript. Scientists from Johnson & Johnson also performed drug measurements on hamster samples and provided guidance on the dosing regimens for the preclinical studies. The company had no role in the design, execution, analysis, publication or funding of the clinical trial.Author Conflict of Interests: None to declare.Ethics Approval Statement: The institutional Ethical Committee approved all animal experiments (license P065-2020).The study was conducted in accordance with the International Conference on Harmonization Guidelines for Good Clinical Practice and the Declaration of Helsinki. The protocol was approved by the institutional Ethics Committee and by the Belgian Federal Agency for Medicines and Health Products (EudraCT 2020-001243-15). The trial was part of the DAWn clinical studies.

3.
Int J Cardiol Heart Vasc ; 37: 100912, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1506961

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: ECG abnormalities in COVID-19 have been widely reported, however data after discharge is limited. The aim was to describe ECG abnormalities on admission and following recovery of COVID-19, and their associated mortality. METHODS: All patients hospitalized in a tertiary care hospital between March 7th and July 1st 2020 with COVID-19 were included in a retrospective registry. The first ECG on admission was collected, together with an ECG after hospital discharge in the absence of acute pathology. Automated measures and clinical ECG interpretations were collected. Multivariate Cox regression analysis was performed to predict 1-year all-cause mortality. RESULTS: In total 420 patients were included, of which 83 patients (19.8%) died during the 1-year follow-up period. Repolarization abnormalities were present in 189 patients (45.0%). The extent of repolarization abnormalities was an independent predictor of 1-year all-cause mortality (HR per region 1.30, 95%CI 1.04-1.64) together with age (/year HR 1.06, 95%CI 1.04-1.08), heart rate (/bpm HR 1.02, 95%CI 1.01-1.03), neurological disorders (HR 2.41, 95%CI 1.47-3.93), active cancer (HR 2.75, 95%CI 1.57-4.82), CRP (per 10 mg/L HR 1.05, 95%CI 1.02-1.08) and eGFR (per 10 mg/L HR 0.90, 95%CI 0.83-0.98).In 245 patients (68.1%) an ECG post discharge was available. New repolarization abnormalities were more frequent in patients who died after discharge (4.7% versus 41.7%, p < 0.001) and 8 (3.3%) had new ventricular conduction defects, none of whom died during follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: The presence and extent of repolarization abnormalities predicted outcome in patients with COVID-19. New repolarization abnormalities after discharge were associated with post-discharge mortality.

5.
EBioMedicine ; 66: 103288, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1141720

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The antifungal drug itraconazole exerts in vitro activity against SARS-CoV-2 in Vero and human Caco-2 cells. Preclinical and clinical studies are required to investigate if itraconazole is effective for the treatment and/or prevention of COVID-19. METHODS: Due to the initial absence of preclinical models, the effect of itraconazole was explored in a clinical, proof-of-concept, open-label, single-center study, in which hospitalized COVID-19 patients were randomly assigned to standard of care with or without itraconazole. Primary outcome was the cumulative score of the clinical status until day 15 based on the 7-point ordinal scale of the World Health Organization. In parallel, itraconazole was evaluated in a newly established hamster model of acute SARS-CoV-2 infection and transmission, as soon as the model was validated. FINDINGS: In the hamster acute infection model, itraconazole did not reduce viral load in lungs, stools or ileum, despite adequate plasma and lung drug concentrations. In the transmission model, itraconazole failed to prevent viral transmission. The clinical trial was prematurely discontinued after evaluation of the preclinical studies and because an interim analysis showed no signal for a more favorable outcome with itraconazole: mean cumulative score of the clinical status 49 vs 47, ratio of geometric means 1.01 (95% CI 0.85 to 1.19) for itraconazole vs standard of care. INTERPRETATION: Despite in vitro activity, itraconazole was not effective in a preclinical COVID-19 hamster model. This prompted the premature termination of the proof-of-concept clinical study. FUNDING: KU Leuven, Research Foundation - Flanders (FWO), Horizon 2020, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Itraconazole/pharmacology , Animals , Antiviral Agents/administration & dosage , Antiviral Agents/pharmacokinetics , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/etiology , COVID-19/transmission , Chlorocebus aethiops , Disease Models, Animal , Drug Evaluation, Preclinical , Female , Humans , Itraconazole/administration & dosage , Itraconazole/pharmacokinetics , Itraconazole/therapeutic use , Male , Mesocricetus , Middle Aged , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Proof of Concept Study , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Treatment Outcome , Vero Cells
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