Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 7 de 7
Filter
1.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(11)2023 Jun 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20232822

ABSTRACT

The health crisis has had a strong impact on intensive care units. The objective of this study was to investigate the experience of resuscitation physicians during the COVID-19 health crisis to understand the associated determinants of quality of life, burnout, and brownout. This qualitative, longitudinal study covered two periods (T1, February 2021, and T2, May 2021). The data were collected in individual semi-directed interviews with 17 intensive care physicians (ICPs) (T1). Nine of the latter also participated in a second interview (T2). The data were examined using grounded theory analysis. We identified a multiplication of burnout and brownout indicators and factors already known in intensive care. In addition, burnout and brownout indicators and factors specific to the COVID-19 crisis were added. The evolution of professional practices has disrupted the professional identity, the meaning of work, and the boundaries between private and professional life, leading to a brownout and blur-out syndrome. The added value of our study lies in identifying the positive effects of the crisis in the professional domain. Our study revealed indicators and factors of burnout and brownout associated with the crisis among ICPs. Finally, it highlights the beneficial effects of the COVID-19 crisis on work.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Physicians , Humans , Quality of Life , Longitudinal Studies , COVID-19/epidemiology , Burnout, Psychological , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Critical Care , Surveys and Questionnaires
2.
Information ; 13(11):545, 2022.
Article in English | MDPI | ID: covidwho-2116241

ABSTRACT

Using a qualitative research-based approach, this study aimed to understand (i) the way home-based teleworkers in France perceive and organize their professional activities and workspaces, (ii) their teleworking conditions, (iii) the way they characterize the modalities and the nature of their interactions with their professional circle, and more broadly (iv) their quality of life 'at work'. We performed a lexical and morphosyntactic analysis of interviews conducted with 28 teleworkers (working part-time or full-time from home) before the COVID-19 crisis and the associated establishment of emergency telework. Our results confirm and complement findings in the literature. Participant discourses underlined the beneficial effects of teleworking in terms of professional autonomy, flexibility, concentration, efficiency, performance, productivity, and being able to balance their professional and private lives. Nevertheless, they also highlighted the deleterious effects of teleworking on temporal workload, setting boundaries for work, work-based relationships and socio-professional integration. Despite the study limitations, our findings highlight the need for specific research-based and practical strategies to support the implementation of a sustainable telework organization in the post-COVID-19 pandemic era.

3.
Sustainability ; 14(14):8731, 2022.
Article in English | MDPI | ID: covidwho-1938990

ABSTRACT

Mandatory teleworking has become a major tool of public authorities for mitigating the spread of COVID-19 when work activity allows it. A lexical and morphosyntactic analysis was performed with 22 employees interviewed at home by phone on two occasions during and after a national lockdown (April 2020 and March 2021). The results indicate that the organizational changes initially implemented became sustainable and highlight a change in work practices. Changes in working time structure were observed and led to a feeling of intensification and/or increase in working hours. The preservation of the professional bond through informal exchanges required a deliberate communicative effort. The lack of face-to-face social relations deprived employees of both their usual ways of working and the meaning they found in them. Finally, the continuation of the health crisis (phase 2) and the multiple reorganizations generated a decrease in wellbeing (mental wear and tear). Employees feared that the company's management would retain a working model based mainly on remote working.

4.
Eur J Cancer Care (Engl) ; 31(4): e13599, 2022 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1832030

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: In the COVID-19 crisis context, the main objective of the study is to investigate factors associated with perceived concerns of change in long-term cancer care in patients currently under treatment. METHODS: A French population-based cross-sectional study was performed using an online questionnaire in April 2020. All persons currently receiving cancer treatment and belonging to the Seintinelles Association (https://www.seintinelles.com) were included in this present analysis. Individual sociodemographic characteristics, medical status and information regarding cancer care were collected. Multivariate binomial logistic regression analysis was performed. RESULTS: We included 298 women in the analysis. Younger participants (OR = 0.96 [0.94-0.99]), the need to visit healthcare facilities to receive treatment (OR = 2.93 [1.16-8.52]), deterioration in the quality of communication with the medical team since the beginning of the COVID-19 crisis (OR = 3.24 [1.61-7.02]) and being cared for by a university hospital or a public hospital (OR = 2.19 [1.16-4.23] versus comprehensive cancer centre) were associated with a perceived fear of change in long-term cancer care. CONCLUSION: To address patients' concerns regarding changes in their long-term cancer care, medical teams should consider the patients' own perceptions of the situation and provide clear, appropriate, precise information on cancer care, especially in the centres mostly affected by the COVID-19 crisis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neoplasms , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Long-Term Care , Neoplasms/therapy , Surveys and Questionnaires
5.
Sustainability ; 13(22):12878, 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1538513

ABSTRACT

Several studies have emphasised the effects of perceived social approval in employees’ professional environment (colleagues and managers) on the implementation of remote and mediatised work practices and, more specifically, on their spatial, temporal and material characteristics. The use of information and communication technologies has been identified in the literature not only as affecting the levels felt by employees in terms of their relation to work (organisational commitment and recognition for work accomplished) but also in terms of work-life balance and health (stress and addictions). However, these studies are few in number when it comes to nomadic and informal work practices and rarely address perceived social approval in employees’ professional entourage. We used an empirical study based on a questionnaire survey. The results indicate that employees favour smartphone and laptop use. The effects of perceived social approval in their professional entourage differ according to the technologies used. These uses also have an impact on commitment and recognition, but their effects on employees’ perception of the effects of work life on “non-work” life and on addiction-related behaviours are more nuanced. These findings lead us to discuss the “right to disconnect” and the development of support and supervision schemes for nomadic, informal and mediatised work practices.

6.
Comput Human Behav ; 126: 107010, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1412438

ABSTRACT

Facing the spread of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, we have witnessed a strong recourse to generalised lockdowns and to the deployment of remote working. These emergency measures have also thrown employers and employees into uncertainty regarding the present and future existence of their job. The present study aimed to examine the role of job insecurity and job demands in non-working hours through technologies on emotional exhaustion mediated by Internet addiction. A total of 999 remote workers, 501 of whom live in France and 498 in Italy, completed a self-report questionnaire during the first lockdown. Results suggest that both job insecurity and the requests to use technology for work purposes during non-work time exacerbate emotional exhaustion through the mediation of Internet Addiction. Limitations, future perspectives, and implications for management are discussed.

7.
Social Sciences ; 9(11):196, 2020.
Article in English | MDPI | ID: covidwho-896285

ABSTRACT

During the Covid-19 pandemic, people started teleworking intensively, which has led to some benefits in terms of economic continuity, but also some complaints. International teams of scholars have pointed out the new work-related challenges, underlining leaders’role in successfully managing them. This study aimed at investigating the role of destructive leadership in the job demands–resources and recovery model during the Covid-19 pandemic. In detail, this study intended to assess (1) whether destructive leadership is positively associated with off-work-hours technology-assisted job demand (off-TAJD) and cognitive demands, as well as whether it decreases autonomy, (2) whether two demands—off-TAJD and cognitive demands—and two resources—social support and autonomy—are respectively negatively and positively related to recovery, and (3) whether recovery mediates the relationship between demands, resources, and exhaustion. A total of 716 French remote workers (61% were women) took part in this study. Data were collected using a self-report questionnaire. A multi-group structural equation model was used to test the hypotheses. The findings confirmed a significant association between destructive leadership, the two job demands, and autonomy;furthermore, all three variables mediated the relationship between destructive leadership and recovery. The findings showed the key role played by recovery as a mediator between, on one hand, off-TAJD, cognitive demands, autonomy, and social support, and, on the other hand, exhaustion. This study highlighted the role of destructive leadership, job resources, job demands, and recovery as determinants of exhaustion, illustrating their relationships in a sample of remote workers. Practical implications are discussed.

SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL