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1.
Trends in Anaesthesia and Critical Care ; 45:32-36, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2008139

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has rapidly changed the way that health care providers interact with patients, particularly through the widespread implementation of telemedicine. Previous studies in other medical specialties have examined the role of telemedicine and physician satisfaction with the modality [1], but no such studies have been reported in the field of anesthesiology. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the scope of use and satisfaction with telemedicine among anesthesiologists who were ASA and ESAIC members. We developed a survey that was sent out to anesthesia providers through the European Society of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care (ESAIC) and the American Society of Anesthesiology (ASA). The survey was open for the duration of 30 days, after which it was closed and no new responses could be generated. The survey comprised three major sections and examined, (1) the characteristics of the anesthesia providers, (2) the settings within which they were using telemedicine, and (3) their satisfaction with the experience. We performed analyses to determine if there was a significant difference in satisfaction for those who used telemedicine prior to COVID-19 compared to those who started using it during the pandemic. There were a total of 708 responses from various provider demographics. Satisfaction with developing patient rapport was higher than satisfaction with airway and physical exam. Providers who were using telemedicine before the pandemic had consistently higher rates of satisfaction across all the subcategories. Familiarity with the software could have played a role in this result. Overall, satisfaction among users was high and the majority of practitioners, 86.3%, plan to continue using telemedicine in their practice.

3.
Irish Journal of Medical Science ; 190(SUPPL 4):S155-S156, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1406946
4.
Perfusion ; 36(1 SUPPL):33-34, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1264047

ABSTRACT

Objective: Describe the population of patients with COVID-19 disease needing long ECMO runs and compare characteristics and outcomes with shorter runs. Methods: Descriptive analysis of the ECMOVIBER registry, including 25 ECMO centers in Spain (23) and Portugal (2). All adult COVID-19 patients requiring VVECMO between 1stMarch and 1stDecember 2020 were included. Follow-up period ended 1stDecember. Patients still with support at this time point were excluded for the analysis. Long ECMO run was defined if lasted >30D. High volume center was defined as supporting >15 COVID-19 patients during the study period. Variables described as mean(SD)/median(IQR) or frequency(percentage). For comparisons, the Chi2, Fisher's exact or Mann-Whitney U were use. Results: Of 316 patients, 266 completed the ECMO run at the end of follow up. 46(17%) received long support and 220(83%) shorter runs. Comparisons between the two cohorts are detailed in the table-figure. Patients with longer runs were older and suffered more frequently hypertension but the respiratory condition prior to ECMO was similar. Interestingly, at day 3 of support tidal volume was lower and sweep gas flow was higher in the long run cohort. Supplemental therapies such as prone positioning and CRRT were more frequently implemented in long runs and complications occurred more frequently in this group. However, neither ECMO mortality, nor hospital mortality were higher. Conclusions: In patients with extracorporeal support due to COVID-19, tidal volume and gas flow at day 3 may discriminate those needing long runs. Long runs are not associated with worse survival despite having higher complication rates.

5.
Obesity Facts ; 14(SUPPL 1):135, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1255690

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The lockdown caused by COVID-19 has an extreme impact on most people's lives. Notwithstanding, some individuals are more predisposed to experience deterioration in their psychological status and/or inaccessibility to adequate treatment and, consequently, they should be devoted with greater attention. Namely, for example, post-bariatric surgery patients who need continuous monitoring about eating behavior and psychological distress. Particularly in medium/long term post-surgery (≥ 36 months), a period of increased susceptibility to weight regain. The present study goals are to characterize the psychosocial impact of COVID-19 lockdown for post-bariatric patients and identify its associations with disordered eating behavior and psychological distress. Methods: Twenty-four post-bariatric surgery (M=42.88 months post-surgery, DP=4.73) women (M=50.92 years, DP=12.81) responded to an online questionnaire and a telephone-interview assessing the perceived impact of the lockdown, psychosocial, psychological, and eating behavior aspects during the first lockdown period. Results: Fourteen (58.3%) of the participants inquired reported perceived weight gain during the lockdown, thirteen (54.1%) reported limited access to social support, and twelve (50%) reported limited access to health care. Positive associations were found between the global psychosocial impact experienced during lockdown and difficulties in dealing with emotionally activating situations (rs=.45, p=.027) and stress symptoms (rs=.44, p=.030). Negative associations were found between co-habiting with more persons during lockdown and difficulties in dealing with emotionally activating situations (rs=-.49, p=.015), fear of getting fat (rs=-.48, p=.019), fear of losing control over eating (rs=-.56, p=.005), and disordered eating psychopathology (rs=-.47, p=.022). Conclusion: As clinical implications, the present findings highlighted the need to monitor post-bariatric surgery patients, facilitate health care access, and promote social support during lockdown periods.

6.
Obesity Facts ; 14(SUPPL 1):137, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1255688

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The lockdown imposed by many countries to curb the COVID-19 epidemic had an unprecedented impact on the general population's lives. Recent studies suggest that eating habits are one of the areas particularly affected by stay-at-home orders. Individuals that received bariatric surgery for weight loss may represent a particularly susceptible population to the adverse effects of the COVID-19 lockdown for its potential impact on eating, psychological and, weight loss outcomes. This study seeks to investigate the incremental impact of COVID-19 lockdown on bariatric surgery outcomes. Methods: The present investigation uses data from an ongoing longitudinal study of bariatric patients assessed before surgery (T0), 1.5 (T1), and 3 years after surgery (T2). Two independent groups were compared: the COVID-19-Group (n=35) - T0 and T1 assessment were conducted before the pandemic started, but T2 assessment was conducted at the end of the mandatory COVID-19 lockdown;and the NonCOVID-19-Group (n=66) - who completed the pre-surgery, 1.5-, and 3-year assessment before the epidemic began. Assessment included self-report measures for disordered eating, negative urgency, depression, anxiety, stress, and weight outcomes. General Linear Models for repeated measures were used. Results: General Linear Models for repeated measures showed that the COVID-19-Group presented significantly higher weight concern (F=8.403, p=.005, η2p=.094), grazing behavior (F=7.166, p=.009, η2p=.076), and negative urgency (F=4.522, p=.036, η2p=.05) than the NonCOVID-19-Group. The COVID-19-Group also showed less weight loss (F=4.029, p=.05, η2p=.04) and greater weight regain at T2, with more COVID-19-Group participants experiencing excessive weight regain (20% vs 4.5%).Conclusions: These results show evidence for the impact of the coronavirus outbreak on eating-related psychopathology and weight outcomes in post-bariatric surgery patients, making specialized and systematic care an urgent matter for this population.

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