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1.
Nephrology, dialysis, transplantation : official publication of the European Dialysis and Transplant Association - European Renal Association ; 37(Suppl 3), 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1998452

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIMS During COVID-19, the renal impairment is the most frequent after lung impairment and is associated of poor prognosis particularly in the intensive care unit (ICU). In this work, we aim to assess the incidence of acute kidney injury (AKI) in COVID-19-related acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) patients, the existence of an early renal dysfunction and its prognosis, and its specificity compared with patients with non-COVID ARDS. METHOD This a prospective and multicentric study led in four ICUs. Patients of 18 years and older in ICU with invasive mechanical ventilation for ARDS were enrolled. Precise evaluation of renal dysfunction markers, including urinary protein electrophoresis, was performed within 24 h after the onset of mechanical ventilation. RESULTS From March 2020 to September 2021, 131 patients in ICU for ARDS were enrolled, 98 COVID-19 ARDS and 33 ARDS from other causes. There was more tubular profile in COVID-19 patients (68% versus 24%;P = .001) and a more mixed, tubular and glomerular profile in non-COVID-19 patients (29% versus 14%;P = .001). COVID-19 patients displayed an important tubular proteinuria, tended to display more AKI (49% versus 31%;P = .07), and had a longer duration of mechanical ventilation (18 versus 10 days;P = .002) and longer ICU length of stay (23 versus 15 days;P = .013). In COVID-19 patients, tubular proteinuria was associated with poor renal prognosis with a significant association with the onset of KDIGO ≥ 2 AKI. CONCLUSION COVID-19 ARDS patients had a specific renal impairment with tubular dysfunction, which appeared to be of poor prognosis on kidney and disease evolution.

2.
Anaesth Crit Care Pain Med ; 39(6): 743-744, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1382141
3.
EuropePMC; 2022.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-335386

ABSTRACT

Background: Kidney failure is the second most frequent condition after acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in critically ill patients with severe COVID-19 and is strongly associated with mortality. The aim of this multicentric study was to assess the impact of the specific treatments of COVID-19 and ARDS on the risk of severe acute kidney injury (AKI) in critically ill COVID-19 patients.MethodsIn this cohort study, data from consecutive patients hospitalized in 6 ICUs for COVID-19 were retrospectively collected. The incidence and severity of AKI were monitored during the entire ICU stay. Patients older than 18 years admitted to the ICU for COVID-19-related ARDS requiring invasive mechanical ventilation were included.Results164 patients were included in the final analysis, 97 (59.1%) displayed AKI, of which 39 (23.8%) severe stage 3 AKI and 21 (12.8%) requiring renal replacement therapy (RRT). In univariate analysis, severe AKI was associated with Angiotensin Converting Enzyme inhibitors (ACEI) exposure (p=0.016), arterial hypertension (p=0.029), APACHE-II score (p=0.004) and mortality at D28 (p=0.008), D60 (p<0.001) and D90 (p<0.001). In multivariate analysis, the factors associated with the onset of stage 3 AKI were: exposure to ACEI (OR: 4.238 (1.307-13.736), p=0.016), APACHE II score (without age) (OR: 1.138 (1.044-1.241), p=0.003) and iNO (OR: 5.694 (1.953-16.606), p=0.001). Protective factors were prone positioning (OR: 0.234 (0.057-0.967), p=0.045) and dexamethasone (OR: 0.194 (0.053-0.713), p=0.014).ConclusionsDexamethasone was associated with a prevention of the risk of severe AKI and RRT, and iNO was associated with severe AKI and RRT in critically ill patients with COVID-19. iNO should be used with caution in COVID-19 related ARDS.

5.
EuropePMC; 2022.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-331574

ABSTRACT

Background: Lung ultrasound (LUS) is a validated tool for the management of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)-related pneumonia. An awake prone positioning (PP) improves oxygenation and outcomes in COVID-19 non-intubated patients, but its tolerance remains an issue. A chair positioning (CP) may have beneficial effects on oxygenation and lung aeration. Thus, CP could be an easier alternative to PP. This study assessed the effects of a CP session on oxygenation (using SpO 2 FiO 2 ratio) and lung aeration (using lung reaeration score) changes in non-intubated COVID-19 patients. Methods: An observational multicenter study was conducted in three university hospital intensive care units (ICUs). We retrospectively analyzed prospectively collected data from LUS exams performed before and after a CP session in non-intubated COVID-19 patients. Patients were divided into groups of responders or non-responders in terms of oxygenation and lung aeration. Results: Of the 33 patients included in the study, 14 (44%) were oxygenation non-responders and 18 (56%) were oxygenation responders, and 13 (40.6%) and 19 (59.4%) patients were classified as lung aeration non-responders and responders, respectively. Changes in oxygenation and lung aeration before and after a CP session were not correlated (Pearson’s r = -0.19, p = 0.3, 95% CI: -0.5–0.17). The reaeration scores did not differ between oxygenation responders and non-responders (1 [-0.75–3.75] vs. 4, [-1–6], p = 0.41). The LUS score was significantly correlated with SpO 2 FiO 2 ratio before a CP session (Pearson’s r = 0.37, p = 0.04, 95% CI: 0.03–0.64) but not after (Pearson’s r = 0.17, p = 0.35, 95% CI: -0.19–0.50). Conclusion: A CP session was associated with improved oxygenation and lung aeration in more than half of the non-intubated COVID-19 patients. However, oxygenation and lung aeration changes were not associated, suggesting that a CP session induces a ventilation:perfusion matching alteration.

6.
SSRN;
Preprint in English | SSRN | ID: ppcovidwho-325830

ABSTRACT

Background: Severe COVID-19 is associated with exaggerated complement activation. We assessed the efficacy and safety of avdoralimab (an anti-C5aR1 mAb) in severe COVID-19. Methods: FORCE was a double-blind, placebo-controlled study. Patients receiving oxygen support ≥5 L/min to maintain SpO2 > 93% (WHO scale ≥ 5) were randomly assigned, in a 1:1 ratio to the avdoralimab and placebo arms. Avdoralimab (500 mg loading dose followed by a 200 mg maintenance dose) or placebo (normal saline) was administered intravenously every 48 h until oxygen therapy was no longer needed, and for a maximum of 14 days. Patients received conventional oxygen therapy or high-flow oxygen (HFO)/non-invasive ventilation (NIV) in cohort 1;HFO, NIV or invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV) in cohort 2 and IMV in cohort 3. The primary outcome was clinical status on the WHO ordinal scale at days 14 and 28 for cohorts 1 and 3, and the number of ventilator-free days at day 28 (VFD28) for cohort 2. Findings: Between May 2020 and January 2021, we randomized 207 patients: 99 in cohort 1, 49 in cohort 2 and 59 in cohort 3. Glucocorticoids were administered to 95% of patients during hospitalization. Avdoralimab did not improve WHO clinical scale score on days 14 and 28 (between-group difference on day 28 of -0.26 (95% CI, -1.2 to 0.7, p =0.7) in cohort 1 and -0.28 (95% CI, -1.8 to 1.2, p =0.6) in cohort 3). Avdoralimab did not improve VFD28 in cohort 2 (between-group difference of -6.3 (95% CI, -13.2 to 0.7, p =0.96), or secondary outcomes in any cohort. No subgroup of interest was identified. Interpretation: In this randomized trial in hospitalized patients with severe COVID-19 pneumonia, avdoralimab did not significantly improve clinical status at days 14 or 28.

7.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-307237

ABSTRACT

Background: The rapid spread of coronavirus disease COVID 19 calls for early screening and monitoring of these patients to distinguish those that are likely to worsen from stable patients that may be directed to intermediate care facilities. We designed a score for COVID-19 patients severity assessment, dynamic intubation and prolonged stay prediction using the Breathing Frequency (BF) and oxygen saturation (SPO2) signals. Methods: We recorded BF, and SPO2 signals of confirmed COVID-19 patients admitted during the first and second outbreak of the pandemic in France (March to May 2020 and September 2020 to February 2021) in an ICU of a teaching hospital. We extracted four features from the signals that represent the four last hours before intubation for intubated patients and the mean of the four hours before the median intubation time for non-intubated patients. These data were used to train AI algorithms for intubation recognition. Algorithm robustness was checked on a validation set of patients. We selected the best algorithm that was applied every hour to predict intubation, thus a severity evaluation. We performed a 24h moving average of these predictions giving a S 24 severity score that represent the patient's severity during the last 24 h. MS 24 , the maximum of S 24 was confronted with the risk of intubation and prolonged ICU stay (>5 days). Results: We included 177 patients. Among the tested algorithms, the Logistic regression classifier had the best performance. The model had an accuracy of 88.9 % for intubation recognition (AUC=0.92). The accuracy on the validation set was 92.6 %. The S 24 score of intubated patients was significantly higher than non-intubated patients 48h before intubation and increased 24 hours before intubation. MS 24 score allows distinguishing three severity situations with an increased risk of intubation: green (3%), orange (30%) and red (76%). A MS 24 score superior to 20 was highly predictive of an ICU stay greater than 5 day with an accuracy of 88.8% (AUC=0.95). Conclusions: The score we designed uses simple signals and seems to be efficient to visualize the patient's respiratory situation and may help in decision-making. Real-time computation is easy to implement.

8.
Comput Biol Med ; 142: 105192, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1588022

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: We designed an algorithm to assess COVID-19 patients severity and dynamic intubation needs and predict their length of stay using the breathing frequency (BF) and oxygen saturation (SpO2) signals. METHODS: We recorded the BF and SpO2 signals for confirmed COVID-19 patients admitted to the ICU of a teaching hospital during both the first and subsequent outbreaks of the pandemic in France. An unsupervised machine-learning algorithm (the Gaussian mixture model) was applied to the patients' data for clustering. The algorithm's robustness was ensured by comparing its results against actual intubation rates. We predicted intubation rates using the algorithm every hour, thus conducting a severity evaluation. We designed a S24 severity score that represented the patient's severity over the previous 24 h; the validity of MS24, the maximum S24 score, was checked against rates of intubation risk and prolonged ICU stay. RESULTS: Our sample included 279 patients. . The unsupervised clustering had an accuracy rate of 87.8% for intubation recognition (AUC = 0.94, True Positive Rate 86.5%, true Negative Rate 90.9%). The S24 score of intubated patients was significantly higher than that of non-intubated patients at 48 h before intubation. The MS24 score allowed for the distinguishing between three severity levels with an increased risk of intubation: green (3.4%), orange (37%), and red (77%). A MS24 score over 40 was highly predictive of an ICU stay greater than 5 days at an accuracy rate of 81.0% (AUC = 0.87). CONCLUSIONS: Our algorithm uses simple signals and seems to efficiently visualize the patients' respiratory situations, meaning that it has the potential to assist staffs' in decision-making. Additionally, real-time computation is easy to implement.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Triage , Critical Care , Humans , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Unsupervised Machine Learning
9.
J Clin Med ; 10(23)2021 Nov 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1542625

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To describe clinical characteristics and management of intensive care units (ICU) patients with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 and to determine 90-day mortality after ICU admission and associated risk factors. METHODS: This observational retrospective study was conducted in six intensive care units (ICUs) in three university hospitals in Marseille, France. Between 10 March and 10 May 2020, all adult patients admitted in ICU with laboratory-confirmed SARS-CoV-2 and respiratory failure were eligible for inclusion. The statistical analysis was focused on the mechanically ventilated patients. The primary outcome was the 90-day mortality after ICU admission. RESULTS: Included in the study were 172 patients with COVID-19 related respiratory failure, 117 of whom (67%) received invasive mechanical ventilation. 90-day mortality of the invasively ventilated patients was 27.4%. Median duration of ventilation and median length of stay in ICU for these patients were 20 (9-33) days and 29 (17-46) days. Mortality increased with the severity of ARDS at ICU admission. After multivariable analysis was carried out, risk factors associated with 90-day mortality were age, elevated Charlson comorbidity index, chronic statins intake and occurrence of an arterial thrombosis. CONCLUSION: In this cohort, age and number of comorbidities were the main predictors of mortality in invasively ventilated patients. The only modifiable factor associated with mortality in multivariate analysis was arterial thrombosis.

10.
Ann Intensive Care ; 11(1): 157, 2021 Nov 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1518296

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Since March 2020, health care systems were importantly affected by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) outbreak, with some patients presenting severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), requiring extra-corporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). We designed an ambispective observational cohort study including all consecutive adult patients admitted to 5 different ICUs from a university hospital. The main objective was to identify the risk factors of severe COVID-19 ARDS patients supported by ECMO associated with 90-day survival. RESULTS: Between March 1st and November 30th 2020, 76 patients with severe COVID-19 ARDS were supported by ECMO. Median (interquartile range IQR) duration of mechanical ventilation (MV) prior to ECMO was of 6 (3-10) days. At ECMO initiation, patients had a median PaO2:FiO2 of 71 mmHg (IQR 62-81), median PaCO2 of 58 mmHg (IQR 51-66) and a median arterial pH of 7.33 (IQR 7.25-7.38). Forty-five patients (59%) were weaned from ECMO. Twenty-eight day, 60-day and 90-day survival rates were, respectively, 92, 62 and 51%. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, with 2 models, one with the RESP score and one with the PRESERVE score, we found that higher BMI was associated with higher 90-day survival [odds ratio (OR): 0.775 (0.644-0.934), p = 0.007) and 0.631 (0.462-0.862), respectively]. Younger age was also associated with 90-day survival in both models [OR: 1.1354 (1.004-1.285), p = 0.044 and 1.187 (1.035-1.362), p = 0.014 respectively]. Obese patients were ventilated with higher PEEP than non-obese patients and presented slightly higher respiratory system compliance. CONCLUSION: In this ambispective observational cohort of COVID-19 severe ARDS supported by ECMO, obesity was an independent factor associated with improved survival at 90-day.

13.
Anaesth Crit Care Pain Med ; 39(3): 395-415, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-549176

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The world is currently facing an unprecedented healthcare crisis caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. The objective of these guidelines is to produce a framework to facilitate the partial and gradual resumption of intervention activity in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: The group has endeavoured to produce a minimum number of recommendations to highlight the strengths to be retained in the 7 predefined areas: (1) protection of staff and patients; (2) benefit/risk and patient information; (3) preoperative assessment and decision on intervention; (4) modalities of the preanaesthesia consultation; (5) specificity of anaesthesia and analgesia; (6) dedicated circuits and (7) containment exit type of interventions. RESULTS: The SFAR Guideline panel provides 51 statements on anaesthesia management in the context of COVID-19 pandemic. After one round of discussion and various amendments, a strong agreement was reached for 100% of the recommendations and algorithms. CONCLUSION: We present suggestions for how the risk of transmission by and to anaesthetists can be minimised and how personal protective equipment policies relate to COVID-19 pandemic context.


Subject(s)
Analgesia/standards , Anesthesia/standards , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections , Infection Control/standards , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Adult , Airway Management , Analgesia/adverse effects , Analgesia/methods , Anesthesia/adverse effects , Anesthesia/methods , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , Child , Clinical Laboratory Techniques , Comorbidity , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Critical Pathways , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Cross Infection/transmission , Disinfection , Elective Surgical Procedures , Equipment Contamination/prevention & control , Health Services Accessibility , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Informed Consent , Occupational Diseases/prevention & control , Operating Rooms/standards , Pandemics/prevention & control , Patient Isolation , Personal Protective Equipment/supply & distribution , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Preoperative Care , Professional Staff Committees , Risk , SARS-CoV-2 , Symptom Assessment , Universal Precautions
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