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1.
Am Surg ; 88(6): 1054-1058, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1807809

ABSTRACT

As hospital systems plan for health care utilization surges and stress, understanding the necessary resources of a trauma system is essential for planning capacity. We aimed to describe trends in high-intensity resource utilization (operating room [OR] usage and intensive care unit [ICU] admissions) for trauma care during the initial months of the COVID-19 pandemic. Trauma registry data (2019 pre-COVID-19 and 2020 COVID-19) were collected retrospectively from 4 level I trauma centers. Direct emergency department (ED) disposition to the OR or ICU was used as a proxy for high-intensity resource utilization. No change in the incidence of direct ED to ICU or ED to OR utilization was observed (2019: 24%, 2020 23%; P = .62 and 2019: 11%, 2020 10%; P = .71, respectively). These results suggest the need for continued access to ICU space and OR theaters for traumatic injury during national health emergencies, even when levels of trauma appear to be decreasing.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Emergency Service, Hospital , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Retrospective Studies , Trauma Centers
2.
Clin Infect Dis ; 74(6): 1081-1084, 2022 03 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1707490

ABSTRACT

The clinical significance of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS CoV-2) RNA in stool remains uncertain. We found that extrapulmonary dissemination of infection to the gastrointestinal tract, assessed by the presence of SARS-CoV-2 RNA in stool, is associated with decreased coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) survival. Measurement of SARS-CoV-2 RNA in stool may have utility for clinical risk assessment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Feces , Gastrointestinal Tract , Humans , RNA, Viral , SARS-CoV-2/genetics
3.
Injury ; 53(6): 1979-1986, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1676773

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Results from single-region studies suggest that stay at home orders (SAHOs) had unforeseen consequences on the volume and patterns of traumatic injury during the initial months of the Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). The aim of this study was to describe, using a multi-regional approach, the effects of COVID-19 SAHOs on trauma volume and patterns of traumatic injury in the US. METHODS: A retrospective cohort study was performed at four verified Level I trauma centers spanning three geographical regions across the United States (US). The study period spanned from April 1, 2020 - July 31, 2020 including a month-matched 2019 cohort. Patients were categorized into pre-COVID-19 (PCOV19) and first COVID-19 surge (FCOV19S) cohorts. Patient demographic, injury, and outcome data were collected via Trauma Registry queries. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. RESULTS: A total 5,616 patients presented to participating study centers during the PCOV19 (2,916) and FCOV19S (2,700) study periods.  Blunt injury volume decreased (p = 0.006) due to a significant reduction in the number of motor vehicle collisions (MVCs) (p = 0.003). Penetrating trauma experienced a significant increase, 8% (246/2916) in 2019 to 11% (285/2,700) in 2020 (p = 0.007), which was associated with study site (p = 0.002), not SAHOs. Finally, study site was significantly associated with changes in nearly all injury mechanisms, whereas SAHOs accounted for observed decreases in calculated weekly averages of blunt injuries (p < 0.02) and MVCs (p = 0.003). CONCLUSION: Results of this study suggest that COVID-19 and initial SAHOs had variable consequences on patterns of traumatic injury, and that region-specific shifts in traumatic injury ensued during initial SAHOs. These results suggest that other factors, potentially socioeconomic or cultural, confound trauma volumes and types arising from SAHOs. Future analyses must consider how regional changes may be obscured with pooled cohorts, and focus on characterizing community-level changes to aid municipal preparation for future similar events.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Wounds, Penetrating , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Trauma Centers , United States/epidemiology , Wounds, Penetrating/epidemiology
4.
Critical Care Medicine ; 50:70-70, 2022.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-1595241

ABSTRACT

B Conclusions: b CCCs appear to be correlated with both clinical outcomes as well as patient demographics in patients with COVID-19. B Introduction: b It is known that COVID-19 induces a proinflammatory and prothrombotic state, with certain demographics having higher rates of morbidity and mortality. [Extracted from the article] Copyright of Critical Care Medicine is the property of Lippincott Williams & Wilkins and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full . (Copyright applies to all s.)

5.
Am Surg ; 87(12): 1893-1900, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1511584

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 is a deadly multisystemic disease, and bowel ischemia, the most consequential gastrointestinal manifestation, remains poorly described. Our goal is to describe our institution's surgical experience with management of bowel ischemia due to COVID-19 infection over a one-year period. METHODS: All patients admitted to our institution between March 2020 and March 2021 for treatment of COVID-19 infection and who underwent exploratory laparotomy with intra-operative confirmation of bowel ischemia were included. Data from the medical records were analyzed. RESULTS: Twenty patients were included. Eighty percent had a new or increasing vasopressor requirement, 70% had abdominal distension, and 50% had increased gastric residuals. Intra-operatively, ischemia affected the large bowel in 80% of cases, the small bowel in 60%, and both in 40%. Sixty five percent had an initial damage control laparotomy. Most of the resected bowel specimens had a characteristic appearance at the time of surgery, with a yellow discoloration, small areas of antimesenteric necrosis, and very sharp borders. Histologically, the bowel specimens frequently have fibrin thrombi in the small submucosal and mucosal blood vessels in areas of mucosal necrosis. Overall mortality in this cohort was 33%. Forty percent of patients had a thromboembolic complication overall with 88% of these developing a thromboembolic phenomenon despite being on prophylactic pre-operative anticoagulation. CONCLUSION: Bowel ischemia is a potentially lethal complication of COVID-19 infection with typical gross and histologic characteristics. Suspicious clinical features that should trigger surgical evaluation include a new or increasing vasopressor requirement, abdominal distension, and intolerance of gastric feeds.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Intestinal Diseases/surgery , Intestinal Diseases/virology , Ischemia/surgery , Ischemia/virology , Female , Humans , Laparotomy , Male , Massachusetts , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2
6.
Histopathology ; 79(6): 1004-1017, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1398415

ABSTRACT

AIMS: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has been recognised as a predominantly respiratory tract infection, but some patients manifest severe systemic symptoms/coagulation abnormalities. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of severe COVID-19 infection on the gastrointestinal tract. METHODS AND RESULTS: We examined clinicopathological findings in 28 resected ischaemic bowels from 22 patients with severe COVID-19. Most patients required intubation preoperatively and presented with acute decompensation shortly before surgery. D-dimer levels were markedly elevated in all measured cases (mean, 5394 ng/ml). Histologically, 25 cases (19 patients) showed evidence of acute ischaemia with necrosis. In this group, the most characteristic finding was the presence of small vessel fibrin thrombi (24 of 25 cases, 96%), which were numerous in 64% of cases. Patients with COVID-19 were significantly more likely than a control cohort of 35 non-COVID-19-associated acute ischaemic bowels to show isolated small intestine involvement (32% versus 6%, P < 0.001), small vessel fibrin thrombi (100% versus 43%, P < 0.001), submucosal vessels with fibrinous degeneration and perivascular neutrophils (90% versus 54%, P < 0.001), fibrin strands within submucosal vessels (58% versus 20%, P = 0.007), and histological evidence of pneumatosis (74% versus 34%, P = 0.010). Three cases in this cohort had histopathological findings normally seen in the setting of chronic ischaemia, notably prominent fibroblastic proliferation affecting the outer layer of the muscularis propria. CONCLUSIONS: Herein, we describe the histopathological findings in COVID-19-associated ischaemic bowels and postulate a relationship with the hypercoagulable state seen in patients with severe COVID-19 infection. Additional experience with these cases may further elucidate specific features or mechanisms of COVID-19-associated ischaemic enterocolitis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Colitis, Ischemic/pathology , Colitis, Ischemic/virology , Enterocolitis/pathology , Enterocolitis/virology , Adult , Aged , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2
7.
J Surg Res ; 266: 35-43, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1349537

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Bedside experience and studies of critically ill patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) indicate COVID-19 to be a devastating multisystem disease. We aim to describe the incidence, associated variables, and outcomes of rhabdomyolysis in critically ill COVID-19 patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Data for all critically ill adult patients (≥18 years old) admitted to the ICU at a large academic medical center with confirmed COVID-19 between March 13, 2020 and April 18, 2020 were prospectively collected. Patients with serum creatine kinase (CK) concentrations greater than 1000 U/L were diagnosed with rhabdomyolysis. Patients were further stratified as having moderate (serum CK concentration 1000-4999 U/L) or severe (serum CK concentration ≥5000 U/L) rhabdomyolysis. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify outcomes and variables associated with the development of rhabdomyolysis. RESULTS: Of 235 critically ill COVID-19 patients, 114 (48.5%) met diagnostic criteria for rhabdomyolysis. Patients with rhabdomyolysis more often required mechanical ventilation (P < 0.001), prone positioning (P < 0.001), pharmacological paralysis (P < 0.001), renal replacement therapy (P = 0.010), and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) (P = 0.025). They also had longer median ICU length of stay (LOS) (P < 0.001) and hospital LOS (P < 0.001). No difference in mortality was observed. Male sex, patients with morbid obesity, SOFA score, and prone positioning were independently associated with rhabdomyolysis. CONCLUSIONS: Nearly half of critically ill COVID-19 patients in our cohort met diagnostic criteria for rhabdomyolysis. Male sex, morbid obesity, SOFA score, and prone position were independently associated with rhabdomyolysis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Obesity, Morbid/epidemiology , Rhabdomyolysis/epidemiology , Aged , Body Mass Index , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Comorbidity , Creatine Kinase/blood , Critical Illness , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Incidence , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Obesity, Morbid/complications , Obesity, Morbid/diagnosis , Organ Dysfunction Scores , Prone Position , Prospective Studies , Rhabdomyolysis/blood , Rhabdomyolysis/diagnosis , Rhabdomyolysis/etiology , Risk Assessment/statistics & numerical data , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Sex Factors
8.
Ann Surg ; 274(6): 913-920, 2021 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1337305

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Determine the proportion and characteristics of traumatic injury survivors who perceive a negative impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on their recovery and to define post-injury outcomes for this cohort. BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has precipitated physical, psychological, and social stressors that may create a uniquely difficult recovery and reintegration environment for injured patients. METHODS: Adult (≥18 years) survivors of moderate-to-severe injury completed a survey 6 to 14 months post-injury during the COVID-19 pandemic. This survey queried individuals about the perceived impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on injury recovery and assessed post-injury functional and mental health outcomes. Regression models were built to identify factors associated with a perceived negative impact of the pandemic on injury recovery, and to define the relationship between these perceptions and long-term outcomes. RESULTS: Of 597 eligible trauma survivors who were contacted, 403 (67.5%) completed the survey. Twenty-nine percent reported that the COVID-19 pandemic negatively impacted their recovery and 24% reported difficulty accessing needed healthcare. Younger age, lower perceived-socioeconomic status, extremity injury, and prior psychiatric illness were independently associated with negative perceived impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on injury recovery. In adjusted analyses, patients who reported a negative impact of the pandemic on their recovery were more likely to have new functional limitations, daily pain, lower physical and mental component scores of the Short-Form-12 and to screen positive for PTSD and depression. CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 pandemic is negatively impacting the recovery of trauma survivors. It is essential that we recognize the impact of the pandemic on injured patients while focusing on directed efforts to improve the long-term outcomes of this already at-risk population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Quality of Life , Recovery of Function , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology , Survivors/psychology , Comorbidity , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Time Factors
10.
Clin Infect Dis ; 74(6): 1081-1084, 2022 03 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1303899

ABSTRACT

The clinical significance of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS CoV-2) RNA in stool remains uncertain. We found that extrapulmonary dissemination of infection to the gastrointestinal tract, assessed by the presence of SARS-CoV-2 RNA in stool, is associated with decreased coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) survival. Measurement of SARS-CoV-2 RNA in stool may have utility for clinical risk assessment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Feces , Gastrointestinal Tract , Humans , RNA, Viral , SARS-CoV-2/genetics
11.
J Trauma Acute Care Surg ; 90(5): 880-890, 2021 05 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1199599

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: We sought to describe characteristics, multisystem outcomes, and predictors of mortality of the critically ill COVID-19 patients in the largest hospital in Massachusetts. METHODS: This is a prospective cohort study. All patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) with reverse-transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction-confirmed severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infection between March 14, 2020, and April 28, 2020, were included; hospital and multisystem outcomes were evaluated. Data were collected from electronic records. Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) was defined as PaO2/FiO2 ratio of ≤300 during admission and bilateral radiographic pulmonary opacities. Multivariable logistic regression analyses adjusting for available confounders were performed to identify predictors of mortality. RESULTS: A total of 235 patients were included. The median (interquartile range [IQR]) Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score was 5 (3-8), and the median (IQR) PaO2/FiO2 was 208 (146-300) with 86.4% of patients meeting criteria for ARDS. The median (IQR) follow-up was 92 (86-99) days, and the median ICU length of stay was 16 (8-25) days; 62.1% of patients were proned, 49.8% required neuromuscular blockade, and 3.4% required extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. The most common complications were shock (88.9%), acute kidney injury (AKI) (69.8%), secondary bacterial pneumonia (70.6%), and pressure ulcers (51.1%). As of July 8, 2020, 175 patients (74.5%) were discharged alive (61.7% to skilled nursing or rehabilitation facility), 58 (24.7%) died in the hospital, and only 2 patients were still hospitalized, but out of the ICU. Age (odds ratio [OR], 1.08; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.04-1.12), higher median Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score at ICU admission (OR, 1.24; 95% CI, 1.06-1.43), elevated creatine kinase of ≥1,000 U/L at hospital admission (OR, 6.64; 95% CI, 1.51-29.17), and severe ARDS (OR, 5.24; 95% CI, 1.18-23.29) independently predicted hospital mortality.Comorbidities, steroids, and hydroxychloroquine treatment did not predict mortality. CONCLUSION: We present here the outcomes of critically ill patients with COVID-19. Age, acuity of disease, and severe ARDS predicted mortality rather than comorbidities. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Prognostic, level III.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/mortality , Hospital Mortality , Patient Acuity , Acute Kidney Injury/virology , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Antimalarials/therapeutic use , Boston/epidemiology , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19/therapy , Comorbidity , Creatine Kinase/blood , Critical Care , Critical Illness , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation , Female , Gastrointestinal Diseases/virology , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/therapeutic use , Length of Stay , Male , Middle Aged , Neuromuscular Blockade , Organ Dysfunction Scores , Pneumonia, Bacterial/virology , Pressure Ulcer/etiology , Prone Position , Prospective Studies , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/physiopathology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/virology , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Shock/virology , Steroids/therapeutic use , Survival Rate , Thromboembolism/virology , Treatment Outcome
13.
Elife ; 92020 10 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-844205

ABSTRACT

This study examined records of 2566 consecutive COVID-19 patients at five Massachusetts hospitals and sought to predict level-of-care requirements based on clinical and laboratory data. Several classification methods were applied and compared against standard pneumonia severity scores. The need for hospitalization, ICU care, and mechanical ventilation were predicted with a validation accuracy of 88%, 87%, and 86%, respectively. Pneumonia severity scores achieve respective accuracies of 73% and 74% for ICU care and ventilation. When predictions are limited to patients with more complex disease, the accuracy of the ICU and ventilation prediction models achieved accuracy of 83% and 82%, respectively. Vital signs, age, BMI, dyspnea, and comorbidities were the most important predictors of hospitalization. Opacities on chest imaging, age, admission vital signs and symptoms, male gender, admission laboratory results, and diabetes were the most important risk factors for ICU admission and mechanical ventilation. The factors identified collectively form a signature of the novel COVID-19 disease.


The new coronavirus (now named SARS-CoV-2) causing the disease pandemic in 2019 (COVID-19), has so far infected over 35 million people worldwide and killed more than 1 million. Most people with COVID-19 have no symptoms or only mild symptoms. But some become seriously ill and need hospitalization. The sickest are admitted to an Intensive Care Unit (ICU) and may need mechanical ventilation to help them breath. Being able to predict which patients with COVID-19 will become severely ill could help hospitals around the world manage the huge influx of patients caused by the pandemic and save lives. Now, Hao, Sotudian, Wang, Xu et al. show that computer models using artificial intelligence technology can help predict which COVID-19 patients will be hospitalized, admitted to the ICU, or need mechanical ventilation. Using data of 2,566 COVID-19 patients from five Massachusetts hospitals, Hao et al. created three separate models that can predict hospitalization, ICU admission, and the need for mechanical ventilation with more than 86% accuracy, based on patient characteristics, clinical symptoms, laboratory results and chest x-rays. Hao et al. found that the patients' vital signs, age, obesity, difficulty breathing, and underlying diseases like diabetes, were the strongest predictors of the need for hospitalization. Being male, having diabetes, cloudy chest x-rays, and certain laboratory results were the most important risk factors for intensive care treatment and mechanical ventilation. Laboratory results suggesting tissue damage, severe inflammation or oxygen deprivation in the body's tissues were important warning signs of severe disease. The results provide a more detailed picture of the patients who are likely to suffer from severe forms of COVID-19. Using the predictive models may help physicians identify patients who appear okay but need closer monitoring and more aggressive treatment. The models may also help policy makers decide who needs workplace accommodations such as being allowed to work from home, which individuals may benefit from more frequent testing, and who should be prioritized for vaccination when a vaccine becomes available.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Health Services Needs and Demand , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Adult , Aged , Area Under Curve , Body Mass Index , COVID-19 , Comorbidity , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Female , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Intensive Care Units/supply & distribution , Male , Massachusetts/epidemiology , Middle Aged , Nonlinear Dynamics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Procedures and Techniques Utilization , ROC Curve , Respiration, Artificial/statistics & numerical data , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Ventilators, Mechanical/supply & distribution
15.
J Invest Surg ; 34(12): 1355-1365, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-720888

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Educating and equipping students and trainees into clinicians capable of meeting healthcare demands and service provision needs is essential. Unprecedented events like COVID-19 pandemic, highlight urgent need for reformation of training to ensure high quality education is maintained. To this end, we describe an innovative and globally adaptable blueprint for establishing a surgical curriculum, aiming to optimize preparation of future surgeons. METHODS: We used a structured protocol to synthesize evidence from previous systematic reviews focused on surgical education alongside a series of focused original educational studies. This approach allowed incorporation of prospectively applied novel ideas into the existing landscape of published evidence. All material used for this proof of concept derives from the outputs of a dedicated research network for surgical education (eMERG). RESULTS: We propose the foundation blueprint framework called "Omnigon iG4" as a globally applicable model. It allows adaptation to individual local educational environments for designing, appraising and/or refining surgical curricula. We also describe the "Omnigon iG4 Hexagon Pragmatic Model," a novel perspective model which assesses the performance of our blueprint in a multi-layer fashion. This "Hexagon" model is the first to introduce pragmatic outcomes in curricula performance assessment. CONCLUSIONS: This proof of concept, "Omnigon iG4," proposes an adaptable version of a curriculum blueprint. The framework allows educators to establish a surgical curriculum with the ability to map out competencies, permitting full control over their intended learning outcomes. This can form the basis for developing globally adaptable multifaceted Simulation-Based learning (SBL) courses or even surgical curricula for undergraduates.


Subject(s)
General Surgery/education , Curriculum , Humans , Learning
17.
Radiology ; 297(1): E207-E215, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-243264

ABSTRACT

Background Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2, a target of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), demonstrates its highest surface expression in the lung, small bowel, and vasculature, suggesting abdominal viscera may be susceptible to injury. Purpose To report abdominal imaging findings in patients with coronavirus disease 2019. Materials and Methods In this retrospective cross-sectional study, patients consecutively admitted to a single quaternary care center from March 27 to April 10, 2020, who tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 were included. Abdominal imaging studies performed in these patients were reviewed, and salient findings were recorded. Medical records were reviewed for clinical data. Univariable analysis and logistic regression were performed. Results A total of 412 patients (average age, 57 years; range, 18 to >90 years; 241 men, 171 women) were evaluated. A total of 224 abdominal imaging studies were performed (radiography, n = 137; US, n = 44; CT, n = 42; MRI, n = 1) in 134 patients (33%). Abdominal imaging was associated with age (odds ratio [OR], 1.03 per year of increase; P = .001) and intensive care unit (ICU) admission (OR, 17.3; P < .001). Bowel-wall abnormalities were seen on 31% of CT images (13 of 42) and were associated with ICU admission (OR, 15.5; P = .01). Bowel findings included pneumatosis or portal venous gas, seen on 20% of CT images obtained in patients in the ICU (four of 20). Surgical correlation (n = 4) revealed unusual yellow discoloration of the bowel (n = 3) and bowel infarction (n = 2). Pathologic findings revealed ischemic enteritis with patchy necrosis and fibrin thrombi in arterioles (n = 2). Right upper quadrant US examinations were mostly performed because of liver laboratory findings (87%, 32 of 37), and 54% (20 of 37) revealed a dilated sludge-filled gallbladder, suggestive of bile stasis. Patients with a cholecystostomy tube placed (n = 4) had negative bacterial cultures. Conclusion Bowel abnormalities and gallbladder bile stasis were common findings on abdominal images of patients with coronavirus disease 2019. Patients who underwent laparotomy often had ischemia, possibly due to small-vessel thrombosis. © RSNA, 2020.


Subject(s)
Abdomen/diagnostic imaging , Coronavirus Infections/diagnostic imaging , Gastrointestinal Diseases/diagnostic imaging , Gastrointestinal Diseases/virology , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnostic imaging , Abdomen/pathology , Abdomen/surgery , Abdomen/virology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Female , Gastrointestinal Diseases/pathology , Gastrointestinal Diseases/surgery , Humans , Laparotomy , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
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