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1.
Am Surg ; : 31348221091965, 2022 Apr 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1807810

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted vascular surgery services globally and its impact on researchers has illustrated disproportionate barriers for female researchers. We assessed the pandemic's consequences on bibliometric trends in vascular surgery and vascular medicine throughout the pandemic. METHODS: A scoping review was performed using the PubMed/MEDLINE, Scopus, and EMBASE databases from January to December 2020 to identify articles related to COVID-19 and vascular surgery or vascular medicine. Articles only describing cardiac or neurovascular care were excluded. The scoping review was performed according to the PRISMA-ScR guidelines. Bibliometric data were extracted and analyzed. RESULTS: Four hundred and fourteen articles were identified, including 125 (30.2%) original articles, 42 (10.1%) review papers, 105 (25.4%) case reports, 27 (6.5%) editorials and commentaries, 94 (22.7%) letters and correspondences, and 21 (5.1%) conference abstracts. The 5 most common countries of study or discussion were all high-income countries. English was the predominant (n = 393, 94.9%) language. Funding was reported for 5.1% (n = 21) of articles. In the first 6 months, 17.6% (n = 30) of first authors and 10.6% (n = 18) of last authors were female, while the last 6 months saw an increase in representation to 30.6% (n = 74) and 15.6% (n = 38) for first and last author, respectively. CONCLUSION: The pandemic caused a rapid surge in vascular publications related to COVID-19. Female authors remain underrepresented in vascular research and the share in female authorship has dropped early in the pandemic, but rose after the end of the first wave. High-income countries remain overrepresented in research productivity, alluding to important disparities in COVID-19-related literature.

2.
Ann Surg ; 274(6): e813-e814, 2021 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1522425

Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
3.
Future Virol ; 0(0)2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1502242

ABSTRACT

In November, dozens of nations and the WHO will draft the international treaty for pandemic preparedness and response. Will the treaty be the needed change in global health equity or are we doomed to repeat history?

4.
Am Surg ; 87(7): 1021-1024, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1379708

ABSTRACT

Social media has become a permeating form of communication with billions of daily users. Twitter in particular has become a tool for the surgical community to engage with other providers, as well as patients, through active online discussions, sharing of research, and highlighting opportunities for community outreach. Twitter can help with personal branding, mentorship, and international collaboration on multiple types of academic endeavors. Likewise, institutional and residency programs can harness the power of social media to develop an online presence and aid in resident recruitment.


Subject(s)
General Surgery , Social Media , Humans
5.
J Card Surg ; 36(9): 3289-3293, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1273122

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has been a worldwide challenge, and efforts to "flatten the curve," including restrictions imposed by policymakers and medical societies, have forced a reduction in the number of procedures performed in the Brazilian Health Care System. The aim of this study is to evaluate the outcomes of coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) from 2008 to 2020 in the SUS and to assess the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic in the number of procedures and death rate of CABG performed in 2020 through the database DATASUS. METHODS: This study is based on publicly available material obtained from DATASUS, the Brazilian Ministry of Health's data processing system, on numbers of surgical procedures and death rates. Only isolated CABG procedures were included in our study. We used the TabNet software from the DATASUS website to generate reports. RESULTS: We identified 281,760 CABG procedures performed from January 2008 to December 2020. The average number of procedures until the end of 2019 was of 22,104. During 2020 there was a 25% reduction CABG procedures, to 16,501. There was an increase in the national death rate caused by a statistical significant increase in death rates in Brazil's Southeast and Central-west regions. CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 pandemic remains a global challenge for Brazil's health care system. During the year of 2020 there was a reduction in access to CABG related to an increase in the number of COVID-19 cases. There was also an increase in the national CABG death rate.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Brazil/epidemiology , Coronary Artery Bypass , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
7.
Eur J Cardiothorac Surg ; 60(1): 206-207, 2021 07 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1057845
11.
Am. Rev. Public Adm. ; 2020.
Article in English | WHO COVID, ELSEVIER | ID: covidwho-671770

ABSTRACT

The novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has rapidly wrought havoc on the world, exposing the gaps in public health systems of countries that were previously considered most prepared for infectious disease outbreaks. Notably, despite being ranked highest on the Global Health Security Index, the United States has been severely hit with nearly two million confirmed cases and one hundred thousand deaths by the end of May 2020. In addition to the public health fragmentation from the federal to the state level and lagging regulations, early reports highlight substantial socioeconomic disparities and health system barriers contributing to the spread and impact of the pandemic in the United States. In this review, we explore the impact of COVID-19 on public health systems by assessing systems through the lens of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Ten Essential Public Health Services. Building on prepandemic and COVID-19 observations and lessons, we propose recommendations moving forward to prepare for future waves and other disease outbreaks.

15.
Int J Qual Health Care ; 33(1)2021 Mar 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-615863

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 has, in the span of weeks, immobilized entire countries and mobilized leading institutions worldwide in a race towards treatments and preventions. Although several solutions such as telemedicine and online education platforms have been implemented to reduce human contact and further transmission, countries need to favour collectivism both within and beyond their borders. Inspired by experiences of previous outbreaks such as SARS in 2003 and Ebola in 2014-2015, global solidarity is a must in order to prevent further morbidity and mortality. Examples in leadership and collaborations ranging from research funds from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation to mask donations by the Jack Ma Foundation should be celebrated as examples to follow. Open communication and transparency will be crucial in monitoring the evolution of the disease in the global effort of flattening the curve. This crisis will challenge the integrity and fuel innovation of health systems worldwide, whilst posing a new quality chasm that warrants increased recognition.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Global Health , International Cooperation , Communication , Health Policy , Humans , Pandemics , Quality of Health Care/organization & administration , SARS-CoV-2
17.
Int J Surg ; 79: 43-46, 2020 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-276448

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic resulted in significant changes in health care systems worldwide, with low- and middle-income countries (LMIC) sustaining important repercussions. Specifically, alongside cancellation and postponements of non-essential surgical services, emergency and essential surgical care delivery may become affected due to the shift of human and material resources towards fighting the pandemic. For surgeries that do get carried through, new difficulties arise in protecting surgical personnel from contracting SARS-CoV-2. This scarcity in LMIC surgical ecosystems may result in higher morbidity and mortality, in addition to the COVID-19 toll. This paper aims to explore the potential consequences of COVID-19 on the emergency and essential surgical care in LMICs, to offer recommendations to mitigate damages and to reflect on preparedness for future crises. Reducing the devastating consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic on LMIC emergency and essential surgical services can be achieved through empowering communities with accurate information and knowledge on prevention, optimizing surgical material resources, providing quality training of health care personnel to treat SARS-CoV-2, and ensuring adequate personal protection equipment for workers on the frontline. While LMIC health systems are under larger strain, the experience from previous outbreaks may aid in order to innovate and adapt to the current pandemic. Protecting LMIC surgical ecosystems will be a pivotal process in ensuring that previous health system strengthening efforts are preserved, comprehensive care for populations worldwide are ensured, and to allow for future developments beyond the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Developing Countries , Emergency Service, Hospital/organization & administration , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Surgery Department, Hospital/organization & administration , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Humans , Infection Control , Medical Staff, Hospital/organization & administration , Pandemics/prevention & control , Personal Protective Equipment , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Poverty Areas , SARS-CoV-2
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