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1.
BMJ Case Reports ; 14(4), 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1208741

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic caused by the SARS-CoV-2 virus has affected millions of people around the globe. The most common presentation of COVID-19 is fever and upper and lower respiratory tract infection. Myalgia is fairly common in the prodromal phase of the viral illness which self-resolves. There is very scant literature on autoimmune myositis triggered by COVID-19 infection. We report a case of SARS-CoV-2 infection, who presented with progressive muscle weakness with rhabdomyolysis and necrotizing autoimmune myopathy on muscle biopsy. This case report imposes awareness of musculoskeletal autoimmune processes triggered by COVID-19 which requires clinical suspicion for early diagnosis and initiation of treatment.

2.
BMJ Case Rep ; 14(4)2021 Apr 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1180949

ABSTRACT

Since the emergence of SARS-CoV-2, clinicians have been challenged with a wide spectrum of disease severity. One of the serious complications associated with the virus is multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C). It is characterised by inflammation leading to organ damage, in the setting of positive SARS-CoV-2 infection. MIS-C is thought to be a postviral reaction where most children are negative on PCR testing but are positive for SARS-CoV-2 antibodies. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently defined the same phenomenon occurring in adults as multisystem inflammatory syndrome in adults (MIS-A) and emphasised on the use of antibody testing in this population. Here we describe an adult woman with an exposure to SARS-CoV-2 who presented with unexplained organ failure and shock. Positive antibody testing was the only clue to the diagnosis of MIS-A. We stress the importance of SARS-CoV-2 antibody detection in order to identify these cases.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/virology , Adult , Antibodies, Viral , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19 Serological Testing , Diagnosis, Differential , Female , Humans , Multiple Organ Failure/diagnosis , Multiple Organ Failure/virology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/diagnosis , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/drug therapy
3.
BMJ Case Rep ; 13(9)2020 Sep 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-751545

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 disease is a viral illness that predominantly causes pneumonia and severe acute respiratory distress syndrome. The endothelial injury and hypercoagulability secondary to the inflammatory response predisposes severely ill patients to venous thromboembolism. The exact mechanism of hypercoagulability is still under investigation, but it is known to be associated with poor prognosis. The most common thrombotic complication reported among these patients is pulmonary embolism. To our knowledge, gonadal vein thrombosis is an uncommon phenomenon that has not been reported in the setting of COVID-19-associated coagulopathy. We report an unusual case of ovarian vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism associated with COVID-19 presenting with abdominal pain. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of COVID-19 with absent respiratory symptoms and presentation with venous thrombosis in an unusual location.


Subject(s)
Blood Coagulation Disorders/virology , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Ovary/blood supply , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Venous Thrombosis/virology , COVID-19 , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Pandemics
4.
Drugs ; 80(15): 1553-1562, 2020 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-716437

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV­2), is now a global pandemic. This virus primarily affects the respiratory tract and causes lung injury characterized by acute respiratory distress syndrome. Although the pathophysiology of COVID-19 is not yet clear, the most widely accepted mechanism is systemic inflammation. A clinically significant effect of the inflammation is coagulopathy. As a result of this effect, patients are found to have a high risk of venous thromboembolism. Studies have reported a high incidence of thrombotic complications in critically ill patients with COVID-19. In this review, we discuss the most updated evidence on the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of the coagulopathy of COVID-19. Prophylactic anticoagulation is recommended for all in-patients with COVID-19. Those with a higher risk of developing thromboembolic events or who have already developed venous thromboembolism should be treated with therapeutic anticoagulation. We also discuss post-discharge prophylaxis for high-risk patients and some newly proposed treatments for the hypercoagulability that could improve the outcomes of the affected patients.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Thrombosis/prevention & control , Venous Thromboembolism/prevention & control , Anticoagulants/administration & dosage , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , COVID-19 , Critical Illness , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Thrombosis/virology , Venous Thromboembolism/virology
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