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1.
G Chir ; 42(2): e02, 2022 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2097497

ABSTRACT

Background: The present study aims to evaluate how the measures to contain the SARS-CoV-2 spreading affected the surgical site infections (SSIs) rate in patients who underwent nondeferrable breast cancer surgery (BCS). Methods: This study is a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data from a consecutive series of patients underwent nondeferrable BCS in a regional Italian Covid-free hub during two different period: March to April 2020 (pandemic cohort [PC]) and March till April 2019 (control cohort [CC]). SSIs were defined according to the criteria established by the Center for disease control and prevention (CDC) and additional treatment, serous discharge, erythema, purulent exudate, separation of deep tissues, isolation of bacteria, and stay (ASEPSIS) scoring systems. Results: One hundred ninety-nine patients were included in the present study: 100 and 99 patients who underwent nondeferrable BCS from March to April 2020 (PC) and from March to April 2019 (CC), respectively. The overall SSIs rate in this series was 9.1% according to CDC criteria and 6.5% according to ASEPSIS criteria. The SSIs incidence decreased during the pandemic period. Moreover, the SSIs rate according to ASEPSIS criteria was statistically lower in the PC than in the CC. We observed significant evidence of higher SSIs, both in terms of CDC and ASEPSIS score, in patients having undergone breast reconstruction compared with patients not undergoing immediate reconstruction. Conclusions: The restrictive measures issued during the lockdown period seemed to lower the SSIs rates in patients undergoing nondeferrable BCS.

2.
Breast ; 65: 164-171, 2022 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1996049

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Breast cancer (BC) patients' (pts) management was affected by a global reorganization after Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Our multicenter study aimed to assess the impact of COVID-19 on access to diagnosis, staging and treatment for BC pts compared to pre-pandemic. METHODS: Medical records of all consecutive newly diagnosed BC pts referred to 6 Italian Institutions between March and December 2020 were assessed. Monthly access rate and temporal intervals between date of symptoms onset, radiological, cytohistological diagnosis and treatment start were analyzed and compared with 2019. RESULTS: A reduction (25%) in newly diagnosed BC was observed compared to 2019 (666 vs 890). New BC pts in 2020 were less likely to be diagnosed with early stage BC (77% vs 83%, p < 0.01), had a worse performance status according to the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG PS) (19.8% had PS > 0 in 2020 vs 16.5% in 2019, p < 0.01) and fewer pts were asymptomatic at diagnosis in 2020 (54% vs 71%,p < 0.01). COVID-19 did not negatively impact in terms of access to diagnosis, staging and treatment. Time intervals between symptom onset and radiological diagnosis, symptom onset and cytohistological diagnosis, cytohistological diagnosis and treatment start were maintained or improved. However, less cases were discussed in multidisciplinary tumor meetings during 2020 (60% vs 73%, p < 0.01). CONCLUSIONS: Our data proved an alarming reduction of early stage BC associated with the COVID-19 crisis in 2020. Despite the upheaval generated by the pandemic, our study shed light on the effective performance delivered by Italian Oncology Departments to guarantee diagnostic-therapeutic pathways.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , COVID-19 , Breast Neoplasms/diagnosis , Breast Neoplasms/epidemiology , Breast Neoplasms/therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Incidence , Italy/epidemiology , Pandemics
3.
Il Giornale di chirurgia ; 42(2):e02-e02, 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1970331

ABSTRACT

Background: The present study aims to evaluate how the measures to contain the SARS-CoV-2 spreading affected the surgical site infections (SSIs) rate in patients who underwent nondeferrable breast cancer surgery (BCS). Methods: This study is a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data from a consecutive series of patients underwent nondeferrable BCS in a regional Italian Covid-free hub during two different period: March to April 2020 (pandemic cohort [PC]) and March till April 2019 (control cohort [CC]). SSIs were defined according to the criteria established by the Center for disease control and prevention (CDC) and additional treatment, serous discharge, erythema, purulent exudate, separation of deep tissues, isolation of bacteria, and stay (ASEPSIS) scoring systems. Results: One hundred ninety-nine patients were included in the present study: 100 and 99 patients who underwent nondeferrable BCS from March to April 2020 (PC) and from March to April 2019 (CC), respectively. The overall SSIs rate in this series was 9.1% according to CDC criteria and 6.5% according to ASEPSIS criteria. The SSIs incidence decreased during the pandemic period. Moreover, the SSIs rate according to ASEPSIS criteria was statistically lower in the PC than in the CC. We observed significant evidence of higher SSIs, both in terms of CDC and ASEPSIS score, in patients having undergone breast reconstruction compared with patients not undergoing immediate reconstruction. Conclusions: The restrictive measures issued during the lockdown period seemed to lower the SSIs rates in patients undergoing nondeferrable BCS.

4.
Int J Med Sci ; 18(10): 2235-2238, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1190601

ABSTRACT

The spread of the coronavirus disease 2019 (Covid-19) has challenged hard the national health system worldwide. At any level, the role of health care providers has been rapidly revisited and eventually modified to face the pandemic. The search of the balance between the provision of the most appropriate health-related services and safety of both patients and health care providers has become an indisputable necessity. The consequently increased work load, along with a widespread feeling of intellectual isolation, emotional overload, sense of inadequacy for involvement in tasks and disciplines which are not always familiar have all been proposed as factors related to the onset and/or worsening of the burnout phenomenon. This latter is sadly renown among care givers and is particularly common among medical oncologists. We herein share our perspectives on the burnout phenomenon over the course of the Covid-19 pandemic, with a specific focus on medical oncologists. Results from the most recent and inherent studies are presented and commented in light of hints provided by the experience matured by a quite restricted, still potentially representative, number of professionals figures from the medical oncologists' category. Reasons are proposed to explain the sense of inadequacy currently perceived in relation to the limits imposed by the current pandemic. In more detail, we illustrate the nature and extents of some of the most relevant difficulties in the optimal management of cancer patients and constant efforts towards the scientific upgrade which allows for the improvement of the professional performance. The need for a deeper understanding of the roots and consequences of the Covid-19 pandemic on the mental health of medical oncologists is finally stressed.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Oncologists/psychology , Humans
5.
Breast J ; 27(4): 359-362, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1119264

ABSTRACT

Substantial changes in the management of cancer patients have been required worldwide in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Beyond the due details on the primitive cancer site and setting at diagnosis, these latter adaptions are most commonly exemplified by a significant reduction in the screening of asymptomatic subjects, delays in elective surgery and radiotherapy for primary tumors, and dose reductions and/or delays in systemic therapy administration. Advanced breast cancer patients with hormonal receptor positive, HER2 negative tumors are usually treated with endocrine therapy combined with CDK 4/6 inhibitors as first- and second-line treatment. During the pandemic, experts' recommendations have suggested the omission or delay of CDK 4/6 inhibitors delivery, or a careful evaluation of their real need due to the hypothesized increased risk of SARS-Cov-2 infection and disease possibly related to neutropenia. The inherent literature is sparse and inconsistent. We herein present data on the use of CDK 4/6 inhibitors during the pandemic. The evidence reported punctually reflects the experience matured at our Institution, a comprehensive cancer centre, on the topic of interest.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , COVID-19/epidemiology , Protein Kinase Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Breast Neoplasms/drug therapy , Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 4/antagonists & inhibitors , Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 6/antagonists & inhibitors , Female , Humans , Pandemics , Risk Factors
6.
J Exp Clin Cancer Res ; 39(1): 171, 2020 Aug 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-733038

ABSTRACT

The Covid-19 pandemic has challenged hard the national health systems worldwide. According to the national policy issued in March 2020 in response to the evolving Covid-19 pandemic, several hospitals were re-configured as Covid-19 centers and elective surgery procedures were rescheduled according to the most recent recommendations. In addition, Covid-19 protected cancer hubs were established, including the Regina Elena National Cancer Institute of Rome, Central Italy. At our Institute, the Breast Surgery Department continued working under the sign of a multidisciplinary approach. The number of professional figures involved in case evaluation was reduced to a minimum and interactions took place in the full respect of the required safety measures. Treatments for benign disease, pure prophylactic surgery and elective reconstructive procedures were all postponed and priority was assigned to the histologically-proven malignant breast tumors and highly suspicious lesions. From March 15th though April 30th 2020, we treated a total of 79 patients. This number is fully consistent with the average quantitative standards reached by our Department under ordinary circumstances. Patients were mostly discharged the day after surgery and none was readmitted due to surgery-related late complications. More generally, post-operative complications rates were unexpectedly low, particularly in light of the relatively high number of reconstructive procedures performed in this emergency situation. A strict follow up was performed based on the close contact with the surgical staff by telephone, messaging apps and telemedicine.Patients ascertainment for their Covid-19 status prior to hospital admission and hospital discharge allowed to maintain the "no-Covid-19" status at our Institution. In addition, during the aforementioned time window, none of the care providers developed SARS-CoV-2 infection or disease, as shown by the results of anti-SARS-CoV-2 immunoglobulin M and G profiling. In conclusions, elective breast cancer surgery procedures were successfully performed in a lockdown situation due to a novel viral pandemic. The well-coordinated regional and hospital efforts in terms of medical resource re-allocation and definition of clinical priorities allowed to maintain high quality standards of breast cancer care while ensuring safety to the cancer patients and care providers involved.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Breast Neoplasms/surgery , Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast/surgery , Carcinoma, Lobular/surgery , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Mastectomy/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/standards , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Breast Neoplasms/pathology , Breast Neoplasms/virology , COVID-19 , Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast/pathology , Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast/virology , Carcinoma, Lobular/pathology , Carcinoma, Lobular/virology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Middle Aged , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Prognosis , Receptor, ErbB-2/metabolism , Receptors, Estrogen/metabolism , Receptors, Progesterone/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2
7.
J Transl Med ; 18(1): 315, 2020 08 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-712955

ABSTRACT

In the rapidly evolving coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak, inherent literature has been increasing at an impressive rate. Such a dynamic scenario imposes the necessity to define a new framework for cancer care. The first emerging evidence has transmitted contrasting messages with regards to cancer care management. Some authors have hypothesized an increased infection risk for cancer patients, with a more severe disease, requiring a reorganization of health care system that could disrupt an established high quality cancer care routine in many developed countries. Other authors have attempted to interpret data related to cancer patients by better defining their "active status". We herein present our point of view in the light of current evidence and based on the experience matured at our cancer institute in managing cancer patients during the COVID-19 pandemic. Our core idea is that "active cancer" may be considered a proxy of more recent exposure to diagnostic or therapeutic procedures, and the frequency of access to health care facilities can be predicted as a function of the severity of cancer symptoms. Hence, COVID-19 screening program and the adjustment of cancer care provision in a cancer institutions should be led by this risk model, while awaiting new evidence.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Coronavirus , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , China , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
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