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1.
PLoS One ; 17(7): e0271358, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1938449

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To compare the characteristics, management, and prognosis of patients admitted to intensive care units (ICU) for coronavirus disease (COVID)-19 during the first two waves of the outbreak and to evaluate the relationship between ICU strain (ICU demand due to COVID-19 admissions) and mortality. METHODS: In a multicentre retrospective study, 1166 COVID-19 patients admitted to five ICUs in France between 20 February and 31 December 2020 were included. Data were collected at each ICU from medical records. A Cox proportional-hazards model identified factors associated with 28-day mortality. RESULTS: 640 patients (55%) were admitted during the first wave (February to June 2020) and 526 (45%) during the second wave (July to December 2020). ICU strain was lower during the second wave (-0.81 [-1.04 --0.31] vs. 1.18 [-0.34-1.29] SD when compared to mean COVID-19 admission in each center during study period, P<0.001). Patients admitted during the second wave were older, had more profound hypoxemia and lower SOFA. High flow nasal cannula was more frequently used during the second wave (68% vs. 39%, P<0.001) and intubation was less frequent (46% vs. 69%, P<0.001). Neither 28-day mortality (30% vs. 26%, P = 0.12) nor hospital mortality (37% vs. 31%, P = 0.27) differed between first and second wave. Overweight and obesity were associated with lower 28-day mortality while older age, underlying chronic kidney disease, severity at ICU admission as assessed by SOFA score and ICU strain were associated with higher 28-day mortality. ICU strain was not associated with hospital mortality. CONCLUSION: The characteristics and the management of patients varied between the first and the second wave of the pandemic. Rather than the wave, ICU strain was independently associated with 28-day mortality, but not with hospital mortality.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/epidemiology , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies
2.
Intensive Care Med ; 48(6): 667-678, 2022 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1899121

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Severely ill patients affected by coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) develop circulatory failure. We aimed to report patterns of left and right ventricular dysfunction in the first echocardiography following admission to intensive care unit (ICU). METHODS: Retrospective, descriptive study that collected echocardiographic and clinical information from severely ill COVID-19 patients admitted to 14 ICUs in 8 countries. Patients admitted to ICU who received at least one echocardiography between 1st February 2020 and 30th June 2021 were included. Clinical and echocardiographic data were uploaded using a secured web-based electronic database (REDCap). RESULTS: Six hundred and seventy-seven patients were included and the first echo was performed 2 [1, 4] days after ICU admission. The median age was 65 [56, 73] years, and 71% were male. Left ventricle (LV) and/or right ventricle (RV) systolic dysfunction were found in 234 (34.5%) patients. 149 (22%) patients had LV systolic dysfunction (with or without RV dysfunction) without LV dilatation and no elevation in filling pressure. 152 (22.5%) had RV systolic dysfunction. In 517 patients with information on both paradoxical septal motion and quantitative RV size, 90 (17.4%) had acute cor pulmonale (ACP). ACP was associated with mechanical ventilation (OR > 4), pulmonary embolism (OR > 5) and increased PaCO2. Exploratory analyses showed that patients with ACP and older age were more likely to die in hospital (including ICU). CONCLUSION: Almost one-third of this cohort of critically ill COVID-19 patients exhibited abnormal LV and/or RV systolic function in their first echocardiography assessment. While LV systolic dysfunction appears similar to septic cardiomyopathy, RV systolic dysfunction was related to pressure overload due to positive pressure ventilation, hypercapnia and pulmonary embolism. ACP and age seemed to be associated with mortality in this cohort.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Heart Failure , Hypertension, Pulmonary , Pulmonary Embolism , Ventricular Dysfunction, Left , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right , Aged , Echocardiography , Female , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Male , Retrospective Studies , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right/diagnostic imaging
5.
Vieillard-Baron, Antoine, Flicoteaux, Rémi, Salmona, Maud, Annane, Djillali, Ayed, Soufia, Azoulay, Elie, Bellaiche, Raphael, Beloucif, Sadek, Berti, Enora, Bertier, Astrid, Besset, Sébastien, Bret, Marlène, Cariou, Alain, Carpentier, Christophe, Chaouch, Oussama, Chariot, Appoline, Charron, Cyril, Charpentier, Julien, Cheurfa, Cherifa, Cholley, Bernard, Clerc, Sébastien, Combes, Alain, Chousterman, Benjamin, Cohen, Yves, Constantin, Jean-Michel, Damoisel, Charles, Darmon, Michael, Degos, Vincent, D’Ableiges, Bertrand De Maupeou, Demeret, Sophie, Montmollin, Etienne De, Demoule, Alexandre, Depret, Francois, Diehl, Jean-Luc, Djibré, Michel, Do, Chung-Hi, Dudoignon, Emmanuel, Duranteau, Jacques, Fartoukh, Muriel, Fieux, Fabienne, Gayat, Etienne, Gennequin, Mael, Guidet, Bertrand, Gutton, Christophe, Hamada, Sophie, Heming, Nicholas, Jouffroy, Romain, Keita-Meyer, Hawa, Langeron, Olivier, Lortat-Jacob, Brice, Marey, Jonathan, Mebazaa, Alexandre, Megarbane, Bruno, Mekontso-Dessap, Armand, Mira, Jean-Paul, Molle, Julie, Mongardon, Nicolas, Montravers, Philippe, Morelot-Panzini, Capucine, Nemlaghi, Safaa, Nguyen, Bao-long, Parrot, Antoine, Pasqualotto, Romain, Peron, Nicolas, Picard, Lucile, de Chambrun, Marc Pineton, Planquette, Benjamin, Plaud, Benoit, Pons, Stéphanie, Quesnel, Christophe, Raphalen, Jean-Herlé, Razazi, Keyvan, Ricard, Jean-Damien, Roche, Anne, Rohaut, Benjamin, Roux, Damien, Savale, Laurent, Sobotka, Jennifer, Teboul, Jean-Louis, Timsit, Jean-François, Voiriot, Guillaume, Weiss, Emmanuel, Wildenberg, Lucille, Zogheib, Elie, Riou, Bruno, Batteux, Frédéric.
EuropePMC;
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-327150

ABSTRACT

Importance Information about the severity of Omicron is scarce. Objective To report the respective risk of ICU admission in patients hospitalized with Delta and Omicron variants and to compare the characteristics and disease severity of critically ill patients infected with both variants according to vaccination status. Design Analysis from the APHP database, called Reality, prospectively recording the following information in consecutive patients admitted in the ICU for COVID-19: age, sex, immunosuppression, vaccination, pneumonia, need for invasive mechanical ventilation, time between symptom onset and ICU admission, and in-ICU mortality. Retrospective analysis on an administrative database, “Système d’Information pour le Suivi des Victimes” (SI-VIC), which lists hospitalized COVID-19 patients. Setting 39 hospitals in the Paris area from APHP group. Participants Patients hospitalized from December 1, 2021 to January 18, 2022 for COVID-19. Main outcomes and measures Risk of ICU admission was evaluated in 3761 patients and Omicron cases were compared to Delta cases in the ICU in 888 consecutive patients. Results On January 18, 45% of patients in the ICU and 63.8% of patients in conventional hospital units were infected with the Omicron variant (p < 0.001). The risk of ICU admission with Omicron was reduced by 64% than with Delta (9.3% versus 25.8% of cases, respectively, p < 0.001). In critically ill patients, 400 had the Delta variant, 229 the Omicron variant, 98 had an uninformative variant screening test and 161 did not have information on variant screening test. 747 patients (84.1%) were admitted for pneumonia. Compared to patients infected with Delta, Omicron patients were more vaccinated (p<0.001), even with 3 doses, more immunocompromised (p<0.001), less admitted for pneumonia (p<0.001), especially when vaccinated (62.1% in vaccinated versus 80.7% in unvaccinated, p<0.001), and less invasively ventilated (p=0.02). Similar results were found in the subgroup of pneumonia but Omicron cases were older. Unadjusted in-ICU mortality did not differ between Omicron and Delta cases, neither in the overall population (20.0% versus 27.9%, p = 0.08), nor in patients with pneumonia (31.6% versus 29.7%, respectively) where adjusted in-ICU mortality did not differ according to the variant (HR 1.43 95%CI [0.89;2.29], p=0.14). Conclusion and relevance Compared to the Delta variant, the Omicron variant is less likely to result in ICU admission and less likely to be associated with pneumonia. However, when patients with the Omicron variant are admitted for pneumonia, the severity seems similar to that of patients with the Delta variant, with more immunocompromised and vaccinated patients and no difference in adjusted in-ICU mortality. Further studies are needed to confirm our results.

6.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-323348

ABSTRACT

Background: Need for catecholamines is frequent in COVID-19 patients, but the main echocardiographic patterns are unknown. The objective was to report the main echo patterns in critically-ill COVID-19 patients. Methods: Observational and descriptive study in consecutive COVID-19 patients admitted to the ICU between March 12 and May 8, 2020. Systematic critical care echocardiography (CCE) was performed and retrospectively analyzed off-line. Echo values are reported in the overall population and in patients who required catecholamine infusion during the first 2 days following admission (D 1-2 ) or afterwards until day 7 (D 3-7 ). Results: Of the 79 patients (78% male;median age 63 [56-71];body mass index 29 [26-30]) included, 90% had at least 1 comorbidity. PaO 2 /FiO 2 at admission was 85 [67-162] mmHg. 53% of patients were mechanically ventilated. ICU length of stay was 9 [5-16] days and mortality 34%. 134 echocardiographic studies were performed during the first week in 65 patients. Pulmonary artery acceleration time was decreased (77 [65-97] ms), suggesting pulmonary hypertension. All 39 patients (49%) who required catecholamine infusion underwent CCE and 25.6% had left ventricular (LV) systolic dysfunction, 28.2% acute cor pulmonale (ACP), 7.7% hypovolemia, and 38.5% vasoplegia. Modification of echo patterns was observed at D 3-7 , with less LV systolic dysfunction and more ACP, which was the most frequent pattern. Computed tomography pulmonary angiography in 6 patients with ACP indicated intrapulmonary thrombus in 4. Conclusion: Different echocardiographic patterns were observed during the first week following ICU admission in COVID-19 patients. ACP was frequent and often related to thrombus in the pulmonary circulation.

7.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-304836

ABSTRACT

Background: The aim of our retrospective study was to evaluate the earliest COVID19-related signal to anticipate requirements of intensive care unit (ICU) beds. Although the number of ICU beds is crucial during the COVID-19 epidemic, there is no recognized early indicator to anticipate it. Methods: In the Ile-de-France region, from February 20 to May 5, 2020, emergency medical service (EMS) calls and the response provided (ambulances) together the percentage of positive reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) tests, general practitioner (GP) and emergency department (ED) visits, and hospital admissions of COVID-19 patients were recorded daily and compared to the number of ICU patients. Correlation curve analysis was performed to determine the best correlation coefficient, depending on the number of days the indicator has been shifted. Primary endpoint was the number of ICU patients. Results: EMS calls, percentage of positive RT-PCR tests, ambulances used, ED and GP visits of COVID-19 patients were strongly associated with COVID-19 ICU patients with an anticipation delay of 23, 15, 14, 13, and 12 days respectively. Hospitalization did not anticipate ICU bed requirement. Conclusion: The daily number of COVID19-related telephone calls received by the EMS and corresponding dispatch ambulances, and the proportion of positive RT-PCR tests were the earliest indicators of the number of COVID19 patients requiring ICU care during the epidemic crisis, rapidly followed by ED and GP visits. This information may help health authorities to anticipate a future epidemic, including a second wave of COVID19 or decide additional social measures.

8.
Frontiers in physiology ; 12, 2021.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1660674

ABSTRACT

Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is characterized by protein-rich alveolar edema, reduced lung compliance and severe hypoxemia. Despite some evidence of improvements in mortality over recent decades, ARDS remains a major public health problem with 30% 28-day mortality in recent cohorts. Pulmonary vascular dysfunction is one of the pivot points of the pathophysiology of ARDS, resulting in a certain degree of pulmonary hypertension, higher levels of which are associated with morbidity and mortality. Pulmonary hypertension develops as a result of endothelial dysfunction, pulmonary vascular occlusion, increased vascular tone, extrinsic vessel occlusion, and vascular remodeling. This increase in right ventricular (RV) afterload causes uncoupling between the pulmonary circulation and RV function. Without any contractile reserve, the right ventricle has no adaptive reserve mechanism other than dilatation, which is responsible for left ventricular compression, leading to circulatory failure and worsening of oxygen delivery. This state, also called severe acute cor pulmonale (ACP), is responsible for excess mortality. Strategies designed to protect the pulmonary circulation and the right ventricle in ARDS should be the cornerstones of the care and support of patients with the severest disease, in order to improve prognosis, pending stronger evidence. Acute cor pulmonale is associated with higher driving pressure (≥18 cmH2O), hypercapnia (PaCO2 ≥ 48 mmHg), and hypoxemia (PaO2/FiO2 < 150 mmHg). RV protection should focus on these three preventable factors identified in the last decade. Prone positioning, the setting of positive end-expiratory pressure, and inhaled nitric oxide (INO) can also unload the right ventricle, restore better coupling between the right ventricle and the pulmonary circulation, and correct circulatory failure. When all these strategies are insufficient, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), which improves decarboxylation and oxygenation and enables ultra-protective ventilation by decreasing driving pressure, should be discussed in seeking better control of RV afterload. This review reports the pathophysiology of pulmonary hypertension in ARDS, describes right heart function, and proposes an RV protective approach, ranging from ventilatory settings and prone positioning to INO and selection of patients potentially eligible for veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VV ECMO).

9.
Ann Intensive Care ; 11(1): 86, 2021 May 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1247599

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: While acute kidney injury (AKI) is frequent in severe SARS-CoV2-related pneumonia ICU patients, few data are still available about its risk factors. METHODS: Retrospective observational study performed in four university affiliated hospitals in Paris. AKI was defined according to the KIDGO guidelines. Factors associated with AKI were picked up using multivariable mixed-effects logistic regression. Independent risk factors of day 28 mortality were assessed using Cox model. RESULTS: 379 patients (median age 62 [53,69], 77% of male) were included. Half of the patients had AKI (n = 195, 52%) including 58 patients (15%) with AKI stage 1, 44 patients (12%) with AKI stage 2, and 93 patients (25% with AKI stage 3). Chronic kidney disease (OR 7.41; 95% CI 2.98-18.4), need for invasive mechanical ventilation at day 1 (OR 4.83; 95% CI 2.26-10.3), need for vasopressors at day 1 (OR 2.1; 95% CI 1.05-4.21) were associated with increased risk of AKI. Day 28 mortality in the cohort was 26.4% and was higher in patients with AKI (37.4 vs. 14.7%, P < 0.001). Neither AKI (HR 1.35; 95% CI 0.78-2.32) nor AKI stage were associated with mortality (HR [95% CI] for stage 1, 2 and 3 when compared to no AKI of, respectively, 1.02 [0.49-2.10], 1.73 [0.81-3.68] and 1.42 [0.78-2.58]). CONCLUSION: In this large cohort of SARS-CoV2-related pneumonia patients admitted to the ICU, AKI was frequent, mostly driven by preexisting chronic kidney disease and life sustaining therapies, with unclear adjusted relationship with day 28 outcome.

10.
J Crit Care ; 65: 26-35, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1243040

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) infection may trigger a multi-systemic disease involving different organs. There has been growing interest regarding the harmful effects of COVID-19 on the cardiovascular system. This systematic review aims to systematically analyze papers reporting echocardiographic findings in hospitalized COVID-19 subjects. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We included prospective and retrospective studies reporting echocardiography data in >10 hospitalized adult subjects with COVID-19; from 1st February 2020 to 15th January 2021. RESULTS: The primary electronic search identified 1120 articles. Twenty-nine studies were finally included, enrolling 3944 subjects. Overall the studies included a median of 68.0% (45.5-100.0) of patients admitted to ICU. Ten studies (34.4%) were retrospective, and 20 (68.9%) single-centred. Overall enrolling 1367 subjects, three studies reported normal echocardiographic findings in 49 ± 18% of cases. Seven studies (24.1%) analyzed the association between echocardiographic findings and mortality, mostly related to right ventricular (RV) dysfunction. CONCLUSIONS: Data regarding the use of echocardiography on hospitalized, predominantly ICU, COVID-19 patients were retrieved from studies with heterogeneous designs, variable sample sizes, and severity scores. Normal echocardiographic findings were reported in about 50% of subjects, with LVEF usually not affected. Overall, RV dysfunction seems more likely associated with increased mortality. TRIAL REGISTRATION: CRD42020218439.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Critical Illness , Adult , Echocardiography , Humans , Prospective Studies , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
11.
J Crit Care ; 64: 199-204, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1213340

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Studies performed in spontaneously breathing patients with mild to moderate respiratory failure suggested that prone position (PP) in COVID-19 could be beneficial. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Consecutive critically ill patients with COVID-19 were enrolled in four ICUs. PP sessions lasted at least 3 h each and were performed twice daily. A Cox proportional hazard model identified factors associated with the need of intubation. A propensity score overlap weighting analysis was performed to assess the association between spontaneous breathing PP (SBPP) and intubation. RESULTS: Among 379 patients, 40 underwent SBPP. Oxygenation was achieved by high flow nasal canula in all but three patients. Duration of proning was 2.5 [1.6;3.4] days. SBPP was well tolerated hemodynamically, increased PaO2/FiO2 (78 [68;96] versus 63 [53;77] mm Hg, p = 0.004) and PaCO2 (38 [34;43] versus 35 [32;38] mm Hg, p = 0.005). Neither day-28 survival (HR 0.51, 95% CI 0.16-1.16] nor risk of invasive ventilation [sHR 0.96; 95% CI 0.49;1.88] differed between patients who underwent PP and others. CONCLUSIONS: SBPP in COVID-19 is feasible and well tolerated in severely hypoxemic patients. It did not induce any effect on risk of intubation and day-28 mortality.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Patient Positioning , Prone Position , Respiratory Insufficiency/etiology , Respiratory Insufficiency/therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Aged , Blood Gas Analysis , Cannula , Female , Hemodynamics , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Male , Middle Aged , Paris/epidemiology , Propensity Score , Retrospective Studies , Survival Analysis
13.
Front Med (Lausanne) ; 8: 615984, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1133921

ABSTRACT

Background: Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is a poorly understood disease involving a high inflammatory status. Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) have been described as a new pathway to contain infectious diseases but can also participate in the imbalance of the inflammatory and the coagulation systems. NETs could be a therapeutic target in COVID-19 patients. Methods: Consecutive patients with SARS-CoV2 related pneumonia admitted to the intensive care unit were included in a prospective bicentric study. Neutrophil extracellular trap concentrations were quantified in whole blood samples at day-1 and day-3 by flow cytometry. The primary outcome was the association between the blood NET quantification at ICU admission and the number of days with refractory hypoxemia defined by a PaO2/FIO2 ratio ≤100 mmHg. Results: Among 181 patients admitted to the ICUs for acute respiratory failure related to SARS-CoV2 pneumonia, 58 were included in the analysis. Patients were 62 [54, 69] years old in median, mostly male (75.9%). The median number of days with severe hypoxemia was 4 [2, 6] days and day-28 mortality was 27.6% (n = 16). The blood level of NETs significantly decreased between day-1 and day-3 in patients who survived (59.5 [30.5, 116.6] to 47 [33.2, 62.4] p = 0.006; 8.6 [3.4, 18.0] to 4 [1.4, 10.7] p = 0.001 and 7.4 [4.0, 16.7] to 2.6 [1.0, 8.3] p = 0.001 for MPO+, Cit-H3+, and MPO+ Cit-H3+ NETs, respectively) while it remained stable in patients who died (38.4 [26.0, 54.8] to 44.5 [36.4, 77.7] p = 0.542; 4.9 [1.3, 13.0] to 5.5 [2.8, 6.9] p = 0.839 and 4 [1.3, 13.6] to 2.7 [1.4, 4.5] p = 0.421 for MPO+, Cit-H3+, and MPO+ Cit-H3+ NETs, respectively). In multivariable negative binomial regression, the blood level of MPO+ NETs was negatively associated with the number of days with severe hypoxemia within 7 days (0.84 [0.73, 0.97]), while neither Cit-H3+ NETs nor double-positive NETs were significantly associated with the primary outcome. Conclusion: The whole blood level of NETs at day-1 was negatively associated with the number of days with severe hypoxemia in patients admitted to the intensive care unit for SARS-CoV2 related pneumonia. The lack of decrease of the blood level of NETs between day-1 and day-3 discriminated patients who died within day-28.

14.
Intensive Care Med ; 46(12): 2385-2396, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-917110

ABSTRACT

In ARDS patients, the change from supine to prone position generates a more even distribution of the gas-tissue ratios along the dependent-nondependent axis and a more homogeneous distribution of lung stress and strain. The change to prone position is generally accompanied by a marked improvement in arterial blood gases, which is mainly due to a better overall ventilation/perfusion matching. Improvement in oxygenation and reduction in mortality are the main reasons to implement prone position in patients with ARDS. The main reason explaining a decreased mortality is less overdistension in non-dependent lung regions and less cyclical opening and closing in dependent lung regions. The only absolute contraindication for implementing prone position is an unstable spinal fracture. The maneuver to change from supine to prone and vice versa requires a skilled team of 4-5 caregivers. The most frequent adverse events are pressure sores and facial edema. Recently, the use of prone position has been extended to non-intubated spontaneously breathing patients affected with COVID-19 ARDS. The effects of this intervention on outcomes are still uncertain.


Subject(s)
Prone Position/physiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/physiopathology , Respiratory Mechanics/physiology , Humans , Lung Compliance/drug effects , Lung Compliance/physiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/complications
15.
J Thromb Thrombolysis ; 52(1): 69-75, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-834028

ABSTRACT

Recent reports have suggested an increased risk of pulmonary embolism (PE) related to COVID-19. The aim of this cohort study is to compare the incidence of PE during a 3-year period and to assess the characteristics of PE in COVID-19. We studied consecutive patients presenting with PE (January 2017-April 2020). Clinical presentation, computed tomography (CT) and biological markers were systematically assessed. We recorded the global number of hospitalizations during the COVID-19 pandemic and during the same period in 2018-2019. We included 347 patients: 326 without COVID-19 and 21 with COVID-19. Patients with COVID-19 experienced more likely dyspnea (p=0.04), had lower arterial oxygen saturation (p<0.001), higher C-reactive protein and white blood cell (WBC) count (p<0.0001 and p=0.001, respectively), and a significantly higher in-hospital mortality (14% versus 3.4%, p=0.04). Among COVID-19 patients, diagnosis of PE was performed at admission in 38% (n=8). COVID-19 patients with diagnosis of PE during hospitalization (n=13) had significantly more dyspnea (p=0.04), lower arterial oxygen saturation (p=0.01), less proximal PE (p=0.02), and higher heart rate (p=0.009), CT severity score (p=0.001), C-reactive protein (p=0.006) and WBC count (p=0.04). During the COVID-19 outbreak, a 97.4% increase of PE incidence was observed as compared to 2017-2019 and the proportion of hospitalizations related to PE was 3.7% versus 1.3% in 2018-2019 (p<0.0001). In conclusion, the COVID-19 pandemic leads to a dramatic increased incidence of PE. Physicians should be aware that PE may be diagnosed at admission, but also after several days of hospitalization, with a different clinical, CT and biological features of thrombotic disease.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Pulmonary Embolism/epidemiology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/therapy , Female , France/epidemiology , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Incidence , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Admission , Prognosis , Pulmonary Embolism/diagnosis , Pulmonary Embolism/mortality , Pulmonary Embolism/therapy , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , Time Factors
18.
Intensive Care Med ; 46(9): 1714-1722, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-709553

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is creating an unprecedented healthcare crisis. Understanding the determinants of mortality is crucial to optimise intensive care unit (ICU) resource use and to identify targets for improving survival. METHODS: In a multicentre retrospective study, we included 379 COVID-19 patients admitted to four ICUs between 20 February and 24 April 2020 and categorised according to time from disease onset to ICU admission. A Cox proportional-hazards model identified factors associated with 28-day mortality. RESULTS: Median age was 66 years (53-68) and 292 (77%) were men. The main comorbidities included obesity and overweight (67%), hypertension (49.6%) and diabetes (30.1%). Median time from disease onset (i.e., viral symptoms) to ICU admission was 8 (6-11) days (missing for three); 161 (42.5%) patients were admitted within a week of disease onset, 173 (45.6%) between 8 and 14 days, and 42 (11.1%) > 14 days after disease onset; day 28 mortality was 26.4% (22-31) and decreased as time from disease onset to ICU admission increased, from 37 to 21% and 12%, respectively. Patients admitted within the first week had higher SOFA scores, more often had thrombocytopenia or acute kidney injury, had more limited radiographic involvement, and had significantly higher blood IL-6 levels. Age, COPD, immunocompromised status, time from disease onset, troponin concentration, and acute kidney injury were independently associated with mortality. CONCLUSION: The excess mortality in patients admitted within a week of disease onset reflected greater non-respiratory severity. Therapeutic interventions against SARS-CoV-2 might impact different clinical endpoints according to time since disease onset.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Age Factors , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Comorbidity , Female , France/epidemiology , Humans , Interleukin-6/blood , Male , Middle Aged , Organ Dysfunction Scores , Pandemics , Proportional Hazards Models , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Time Factors , Time-to-Treatment , Troponin/blood
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