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1.
European Journal of Psychotraumatology ; 13(1), 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1661104

ABSTRACT

Based on research from previous pandemics, studies of critical care survivors, and emerging COVID-19 data, we estimate that up to 30% of survivors of severe COVID will develop PTSD. PTSD is frequently undetected across primary and secondary care settings and the psychological needs of survivors may be overshadowed by a focus on physical recovery. Delayed PTSD diagnosis is associated with poor outcomes. There is a clear case for survivors of severe COVID to be systematically screened for PTSD, and those that develop PTSD should receive timely access to evidence-based treatment for PTSD and other mental health problems by multidisciplinary teams. HIGHLIGHTS We anticipate that up to 30% of survivors of severe COVID will develop PTSD, yet PTSD is frequently undetected in primary and secondary care settings. There is, therefore, a clear case for establishing systematic screening and ensuring timely access to treatment.

2.
Eur J Psychotraumatol ; 13(1): 1959707, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1648310

ABSTRACT

Based on research from previous pandemics, studies of critical care survivors, and emerging COVID-19 data, we estimate that up to 30% of survivors of severe COVID will develop PTSD. PTSD is frequently undetected across primary and secondary care settings and the psychological needs of survivors may be overshadowed by a focus on physical recovery. Delayed PTSD diagnosis is associated with poor outcomes. There is a clear case for survivors of severe COVID to be systematically screened for PTSD, and those that develop PTSD should receive timely access to evidence-based treatment for PTSD and other mental health problems by multidisciplinary teams.


Basados en la investigación de pandemias previas, los estudios de los sobrevivientes a cuidados críticos, y los datos emergentes de COVID-19, estimamos que hasta un 30% de los sobrevivientes del COVID grave desarrollarán TEPT. El TEPT es frecuentemente subdetectado en los servicios de salud primarios y secundarios y las necesidades psicológicas de los sobrevivientes puede verse eclipsadas por un enfoque en la recuperación física. El diagnóstico tardío de TEPT se asocia con pobres resultados. Existe un caso claro para que los sobrevivientes del COVID grave sean evaluados sistemáticamente para detectar el TEPT, y aquellos que desarrollan un TEPT deben tener acceso oportuno a tratamientos basados en la evidencia para el TEPT y para otros problemas de salud mental por equipos multidisciplinarios.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology , Survivors/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Mass Screening , Pandemics , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/diagnosis , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/psychology
4.
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol ; 56(1): 1-11, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-947025

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The SARS-CoV-2 / COVID-19 pandemic has raised concerns about the potential mental health impact on frontline clinical staff. However, given that poor mental health is common in acute medical staff, we aimed to estimate the additional burden of work involving high exposure to infected patients. METHODS: We report a rapid review, meta-analysis, and living meta-analysis of studies using validated measures from outbreaks of COVID-19, Ebola, H1N1 influenza, Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS), and severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). RESULTS: A random effects meta-analysis found that high-exposure work is not associated with an increased prevalence of above cut-off scoring (anxiety: RR = 1.30, 95% CI 0.87-1.93, Total N = 12,473; PTSD symptoms: RR = 1.16, 95% CI 0.75-1.78, Total N = 6604; depression: RR = 1.50, 95% CI 0.57-3.95, Total N = 12,224). For continuous scoring, high-exposure work was associated with only a small additional burden of acute mental health problems compared to low-exposure work (anxiety: SMD = 0.16, 95% CI 0.02-0.31, Total N = 6493; PTSD symptoms: SMD = 0.20, 95% CI 0.01-0.40, Total N = 5122; depression: SMD = 0.13, 95% CI -0.04-0.31, Total N = 4022). There was no evidence of publication bias. CONCLUSION: Although epidemic and pandemic response work may add only a small additional burden, improving mental health through service management and provision of mental health services should be a priority given that baseline rates of poor mental health are already very high. As new studies emerge, they are being added to a living meta-analysis where all analysis code and data have been made freely available: https://osf.io/zs7ne/ .


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype , Anxiety , Depression/epidemiology , Emergencies , Humans , Mental Health , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
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