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1.
Pediatrics ; 150(4)2022 10 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2022098

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Because of the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic and recommendations from a range of leaders and organizations, the pediatrics subspecialty 2020 recruitment season was entirely virtual. Minimal data exist on the effect of this change to guide future strategies. The aim of this study was to understand the effects of virtual recruitment on pediatric subspecialty programs as perceived by program leaders. METHODS: This concurrent, triangulation, mixed-methods study used a survey that was developed through an iterative (3 cycles), consensus-building, modified Delphi process and sent to all pediatric subspecialty program directors (PSPDs) between April and May 2021. Descriptive statistics and thematic analysis were used, and a conceptual framework was developed. RESULTS: Forty-two percent (352 of 840) of PSPDs responded from 16 of the 17 pediatric (94%) subspecialties; 60% felt the virtual interview process was beneficial to their training program. A majority of respondents (72%) reported cost savings were a benefit; additional benefits included greater efficiency of time, more applicants per day, greater faculty involvement, and perceived less time away from residency for applicants. PSPDs reported a more diverse applicant pool. Without an in-person component, PSPDs worried about programs and applicants missing informative, in-person interactions and applicants missing hospital tours and visiting the city. A model based upon theory of change was developed to aid program considerations for future application cycles. CONCLUSIONS: PSPDs identified several benefits to virtual recruitment, including ease of accommodating increased applicants with a diverse applicant pool and enhanced faculty involvement. Identified limitations included reduced interaction between the applicant and the larger institution/city.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Internship and Residency , Child , Humans , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires
2.
Acad Med ; 97(3S): S35-S39, 2022 Mar 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1532557

ABSTRACT

In this article, the authors describe the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on pediatric graduate medical education (GME), including the impact on clinical experiences for trainees, teaching methods used, trainee wellness, GME leader wellness and support, and the traditional interview process. A thorough literature review was done to identify impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on pediatric GME. In addition, information was collected through Association of Pediatric Program Directors virtual cafes and conferences. Positive changes for GME from the COVID-19 pandemic included: the rapid transition to telehealth; asynchronous learning allowing for increased cross-program collaboration; innovative online teaching modalities; increased flexibility and decreased cost of online recruitment; and shared innovations across pediatric GME. Challenging aspects of the COVID-19 pandemic included: decreased learning about common childhood illnesses, such as bronchiolitis, acute otitis media, and influenza; decreased patient volumes and patient complexity in clinics and inpatient wards, leading to less practice developing efficiency, time management, and triaging skills; and an increased burden on trainees, including moral distress and decreased support from one another and other social supports. The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted important opportunities in U.S. educational systems. As medical educators move forward, it will be important to learn from these while mitigating the negative impacts.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Medical, Graduate , Pediatrics/education , SARS-CoV-2 , Child , Female , Forecasting , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States
3.
Pediatrics ; 148(4)2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1443877

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic significantly impacted undergraduate and graduate medical education and created challenges that prevented a traditional approach to residency and fellowship recruitment and interviews. Early in the pandemic, the pediatric education community came together to support applicants and training programs and to foster an equitable recruitment process. We describe many of our community's innovations, including the use of virtual cafés to educate programs and highlight best practices for virtual recruitment and the use of regional webinars to highlight residency programs and provide information to applicants. Surveys of applicants and programs suggest that the virtual interview process worked well overall, with applicants and programs saving both time and money and programs maintaining a high rate of filling their positions. On the basis of this experience, we highlight the strengths and weaknesses of 3 potential models for future interview seasons. We close with a series of questions that need further investigation to create an effective and equitable recruitment process for the future.


Subject(s)
Fellowships and Scholarships , Internet , Internship and Residency , Interviews as Topic/methods , Pediatrics/education , Personnel Selection/methods , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Humans , Job Application , Pandemics , Pediatrics/economics , SARS-CoV-2 , United States
4.
J Pediatr Surg Case Rep ; 64: 101734, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1023562

ABSTRACT

We describe 4 children (11-17 years in age) at our institution with acute appendicitis in the setting of SARS-CoV-2 infection, suggesting a possible association. Providers should consider testing for this infection in patients with severe gastrointestinal symptoms, in order to take appropriate transmission based precautions, until more is understood.

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