Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 15 de 15
Filter
1.
J Nucl Med ; 2021 Oct 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1923992

ABSTRACT

During the Corona Virus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, Long COVID-syndrome, which impairs patients through cognitive deficits, fatigue, and exhaustion, has become increasingly relevant. Its underlying pathophysiology, however, is unknown. In this study, we assessed cognitive profiles and regional cerebral glucose metabolism as a biomarker of neuronal function in outpatients suffering from long-term neurocognitive symptoms after COVID-19. Methods: Outpatients seeking neurological counseling with neurocognitive symptoms persisting for more than three months after polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-confirmed COVID-19 were included prospectively between June 16, 2020, and January 29, 2021. Patients (n = 31, 54±2.0 years) in the long-term phase after COVID-19 (202±58 days after positive PCR) were assessed with a neuropsychological test battery. Cerebral 18F-FDG PET imaging was performed in 14/31 patients. Results: Patients self-reported impaired attention, memory, and multitasking abilities (31/31), word-finding difficulties (27/31), and fatigue (24/31). Twelve of 31 patients could not return to the previous level of independence/employment. For all cognitive domains, average group results of the neuropsychological test-battery showed no impairment, but deficits (z-score<-1.5) were present on single-patient level mainly in the domain of visual memory (in 7/31; other domains ≤2/31). Mean MoCA performance (27/30 points) was above the cutoff-value for detection of cognitive impairment (< 26 points), although 9/31 patients performed slightly below this level (23-25 points). In the subgroup of patients who underwent 18F-FDG PET, we found no significant changes of regional cerebral glucose metabolism. Conclusion: Long COVID patients self-report uniform symptoms hampering their ability to work in a relevant fraction. However, cognitive testing showed minor impairments only on single-patient level approximately six months after the infection, whereas functional imaging revealed no distinct pathological changes. This clearly deviates from previous findings in subacute COVID-19 patients, suggesting that underlying neuronal causes are different and possibly related to the high prevalence of fatigue.

2.
Brain ; 2022 Jun 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1890882

ABSTRACT

While neuropathological examinations in patients who died from COVID-19 revealed inflammatory changes in cerebral white matter, cerebral MRI frequently fails to detect abnormalities even in the presence of neurological symptoms. Application of multi-compartment diffusion microstructure imaging (DMI), that detects even small volume shifts between the compartments (intra-axonal, extra-axonal and free water/CSF) of a white matter model, is a promising approach to overcome this discrepancy. In this monocentric prospective study, a cohort of 20 COVID-19 inpatients (57.3 ± 17.1 years) with neurological symptoms (e.g. delirium, cranial nerve palsies) and cognitive impairments measured by the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA test; 22.4 ± 4.9; 70% below the cut-off value <26/30 points) underwent DMI in the subacute stage of the disease (29.3 ± 14.8 days after positive PCR). A comparison of whole-brain white matter DMI parameters with a matched healthy control group (n = 35) revealed a volume shift from the intra- and extra-axonal space into the free water fraction (V-CSF). This widespread COVID-related V-CSF increase affected the entire supratentorial white matter with maxima in frontal and parietal regions. Streamline-wise comparisons between COVID-19 patients and controls further revealed a network of most affected white matter fibres connecting widespread cortical regions in all cerebral lobes. The magnitude of these white matter changes (V-CSF) was associated with cognitive impairment measured by the MoCA test (r = -0.64, P = 0.006) but not with olfactory performance (r = 0.29, P = 0.12). Furthermore, a non-significant trend for an association between V-CSF and interleukin-6 emerged (r = 0.48, P = 0.068), a prominent marker of the COVID-19 related inflammatory response. In 14/20 patients who also received cerebral 18F-FDG PET, V-CSF increase was associated with the expression of the previously defined COVID-19-related metabolic spatial covariance pattern (r = 0.57; P = 0.039). In addition, the frontoparietal-dominant pattern of neocortical glucose hypometabolism matched well to the frontal and parietal focus of V-CSF increase. In summary, DMI in subacute COVID-19 patients revealed widespread volume shifts compatible with vasogenic oedema, affecting various supratentorial white matter tracts. These changes were associated with cognitive impairment and COVID-19 related changes in 18F-FDG PET imaging.

3.
J Clin Immunol ; 42(2): 253-265, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1565436

ABSTRACT

Patients with primary antibody deficiency are at risk for severe and in many cases for prolonged COVID-19. Convalescent plasma treatment of immunocompromised individuals could be an option especially in countries with limited access to monoclonal antibody therapies. While studies in immunocompetent COVID19 patients have demonstrated only a limited benefit, evidence for the safety, timing, and effectiveness of this treatment in antibody-deficient patients is lacking. Here, we describe 16 cases with primary antibody deficiency treated with convalescent plasma in four medical centers. In our cohort, treatment was associated with a reduction in viral load and improvement of clinical symptoms, even when applied over a week after onset of infection. There were no relevant side effects besides a short-term fever reaction in one patient. Longitudinal full-genome sequencing revealed the emergence of mutations in the viral genome, potentially conferring an antibody escape in one patient with persistent viral RNA shedding upon plasma treatment. However, he resolved the infection after a second course of plasma treatment. Thus, our data suggest a therapeutic benefit of convalescent plasma treatment in patients with primary antibody deficiency even months after infection. While it appears to be safe, PCR follow-up for SARS-CoV-2 is advisable and early re-treatment might be considered in patients with persistent viral shedding.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/therapy , Plasma/immunology , Primary Immunodeficiency Diseases/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Antibodies, Monoclonal/immunology , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Child , Female , Humans , Immunization, Passive/methods , Male , Middle Aged , Virus Shedding/immunology , Young Adult
4.
Nat Commun ; 12(1): 6405, 2021 11 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1505001

ABSTRACT

The origin of SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern remains unclear. Here, we test whether intra-host virus evolution during persistent infections could be a contributing factor by characterizing the long-term SARS-CoV-2 infection dynamics in an immunosuppressed kidney transplant recipient. Applying RT-qPCR and next-generation sequencing (NGS) of sequential respiratory specimens, we identify several mutations in the viral genome late in infection. We demonstrate that a late viral isolate exhibiting genome mutations similar to those found in variants of concern first identified in UK, South Africa, and Brazil, can escape neutralization by COVID-19 antisera. Moreover, infection of susceptible mice with this patient's escape variant elicits protective immunity against re-infection with either the parental virus and the escape variant, as well as high neutralization titers against the alpha and beta SARS-CoV-2 variants, B.1.1.7 and B.1.351, demonstrating a considerable immune control against such variants of concern. Upon lowering immunosuppressive treatment, the patient generated spike-specific neutralizing antibodies and resolved the infection. Our results suggest that immunocompromised patients could be a source for the emergence of potentially harmful SARS-CoV-2 variants.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Genome, Viral , Humans , Immune Evasion , Immunocompromised Host , Male , Middle Aged , Mutation , Neutralization Tests , Phylogeny , SARS-CoV-2/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/classification , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics
5.
J Nucl Med ; 2021 Oct 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1470742

ABSTRACT

During the Corona Virus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, Long COVID-syndrome, which impairs patients through cognitive deficits, fatigue, and exhaustion, has become increasingly relevant. Its underlying pathophysiology, however, is unknown. In this study, we assessed cognitive profiles and regional cerebral glucose metabolism as a biomarker of neuronal function in outpatients suffering from long-term neurocognitive symptoms after COVID-19. Methods: Outpatients seeking neurological counseling with neurocognitive symptoms persisting for more than three months after polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-confirmed COVID-19 were included prospectively between June 16, 2020, and January 29, 2021. Patients (n = 31, 54±2.0 years) in the long-term phase after COVID-19 (202±58 days after positive PCR) were assessed with a neuropsychological test battery. Cerebral 18F-FDG PET imaging was performed in 14/31 patients. Results: Patients self-reported impaired attention, memory, and multitasking abilities (31/31), word-finding difficulties (27/31), and fatigue (24/31). Twelve of 31 patients could not return to the previous level of independence/employment. For all cognitive domains, average group results of the neuropsychological test-battery showed no impairment, but deficits (z-score<-1.5) were present on single-patient level mainly in the domain of visual memory (in 7/31; other domains ≤2/31). Mean MoCA performance (27/30 points) was above the cutoff-value for detection of cognitive impairment (< 26 points), although 9/31 patients performed slightly below this level (23-25 points). In the subgroup of patients who underwent 18F-FDG PET, we found no significant changes of regional cerebral glucose metabolism. Conclusion: Long COVID patients self-report uniform symptoms hampering their ability to work in a relevant fraction. However, cognitive testing showed minor impairments only on single-patient level approximately six months after the infection, whereas functional imaging revealed no distinct pathological changes. This clearly deviates from previous findings in subacute COVID-19 patients, suggesting that underlying neuronal causes are different and possibly related to the high prevalence of fatigue.

6.
Dtsch Med Wochenschr ; 146(17): e65-e73, 2021 Sep.
Article in German | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1368971

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Increasing evidence suggests that some patients suffer from persistent symptoms for months after recovery from acute COVID-19. However, the clinical phenotype and its pathogenesis remain unclear. We here present data on complaints and results of a diagnostic workup of patients presenting to the post-COVID clinic at the University Medical Center Freiburg. METHODS: Retrospective data analysis of persistently symptomatic patients presenting to our clinic at least 6 months after onset of acute COVID-19. All patients were assessed by a doctor and routine laboratory analysis was carried out. Quality of life was assessed using SF-36 questionnaire. In case of specific persisting symptoms, further organ-specific diagnostic evaluation was performed, and patients were referred to respective departments/specialists. FINDINGS: 132 Patients (58 male, 74 female; mean age 53.8 years) presented to our clinic at least 6 months after COVID-19. 79 (60 %) had been treated as outpatients and 53 (40 %) as inpatients. Most common complaints were persistent fatigue (82 %) and dyspnea on exertion (61 %). Further common complaints were impairments of concentration (54 %), insomnia (43 %), and impairments of smell or taste (35 %). Quality of life was reduced in all sections of the SF-36 questionnaire, yielding a reduced working capacity. Significant pathological findings in laboratory, echocardiographic and radiological work-up were rare. Impairments in lung function tests were more common in previously hospitalized patients. CONCLUSION: Patients presenting 6 months after onset of acute COVID-19 suffer from a diverse spectrum of symptoms with impaired quality of life, also referred to as Long COVID or Post-Acute Sequelae of SARS-CoV-2 infection (PASC). Further research is needed to determine the frequency of these post-COVID syndromes and their pathogenesis, natural course and treatment options. Evaluation and management should be multi-disciplinary.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Anosmia , Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19/epidemiology , Dyspnea , Fatigue , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Germany/epidemiology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Quality of Life , Retrospective Studies , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders , Surveys and Questionnaires , Taste Disorders , Young Adult
7.
Brain ; 144(4): 1263-1276, 2021 05 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1313840

ABSTRACT

During the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic, neurological symptoms increasingly moved into the focus of interest. In this prospective cohort study, we assessed neurological and cognitive symptoms in hospitalized coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) patients and aimed to determine their neuronal correlates. Patients with reverse transcription-PCR-confirmed COVID-19 infection who required inpatient treatment primarily because of non-neurological complications were screened between 20 April 2020 and 12 May 2020. Patients (age > 18 years) were included in our cohort when presenting with at least one new neurological symptom (defined as impaired gustation and/or olfaction, performance < 26 points on a Montreal Cognitive Assessment and/or pathological findings on clinical neurological examination). Patients with ≥2 new symptoms were eligible for further diagnostics using comprehensive neuropsychological tests, cerebral MRI and 18fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET as soon as infectivity was no longer present. Exclusion criteria were: premorbid diagnosis of cognitive impairment, neurodegenerative diseases or intensive care unit treatment. Of 41 COVID-19 inpatients screened, 29 patients (65.2 ± 14.4 years; 38% female) in the subacute stage of disease were included in the register. Most frequently, gustation and olfaction were disturbed in 29/29 and 25/29 patients, respectively. Montreal Cognitive Assessment performance was impaired in 18/26 patients (mean score 21.8/30) with emphasis on frontoparietal cognitive functions. This was confirmed by detailed neuropsychological testing in 15 patients. 18FDG PET revealed pathological results in 10/15 patients with predominant frontoparietal hypometabolism. This pattern was confirmed by comparison with a control sample using voxel-wise principal components analysis, which showed a high correlation (R2 = 0.62) with the Montreal Cognitive Assessment performance. Post-mortem examination of one patient revealed white matter microglia activation but no signs of neuroinflammation. Neocortical dysfunction accompanied by cognitive decline was detected in a relevant fraction of patients with subacute COVID-19 initially requiring inpatient treatment. This is of major rehabilitative and socioeconomic relevance.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , Cerebral Cortex/metabolism , Cognitive Dysfunction/metabolism , Glucose/metabolism , Mental Status and Dementia Tests , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/psychology , Cerebral Cortex/diagnostic imaging , Cognitive Dysfunction/diagnostic imaging , Cognitive Dysfunction/psychology , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Magnetic Resonance Imaging/methods , Male , Middle Aged , Positron-Emission Tomography/methods
8.
PLoS One ; 16(5): e0249760, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1223796

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Acute kidney injury (AKI) is an independent risk factor for mortality, which affects about 5% of hospitalized coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) patients and up to 25-29% of severely ill COVID-19 patients. Lopinavir/ritonavir and hydroxychloroquine show in vitro activity against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and have been used for the treatment of COVID-19. Both, lopinavir and hydroxychloroquine are metabolized by cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4. The impact of a triple therapy with lopinavir/ritonavir and hydroxychloroquine (triple therapy) on kidney function in COVID-19 is currently not known. METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed both non-ICU and ICU patients with COVID-19 receiving triple therapy for the incidence of AKI. Patients receiving standard therapy served as a control group. All patients were hospitalized at the University Hospital of Freiburg, Germany, between March and April 2020. A matched-pair analysis for the National Early Warning Score (NEWS) 2 was performed to control for the severity of illness among non-intensive care unit (ICU) patients. RESULTS: In non-ICU patients, the incidence of AKI was markedly increased following triple therapy (78.6% vs. 21.4% in controls, p = 0.002), while a high incidence of AKI was observed in both groups of ICU patients (triple therapy: 80.0%, control group: 90.5%). ICU patients treated with triple therapy showed a trend towards more oliguric or anuric kidney injury. We also observed a linear correlation between the duration of the triple therapy and the maximum serum creatinine level (p = 0.004, R2 = 0.276, R = 0.597). CONCLUSION: Triple therapy is associated with an increase in the incidence of AKI in non-ICU COVID-19 patients. The underlying mechanisms may comprise a CYP3A4 enzyme interaction, and may be relevant for any future therapy combining hydroxychloroquine with antiviral agents.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury/etiology , Antiviral Agents/adverse effects , COVID-19/drug therapy , Hydroxychloroquine/adverse effects , Lopinavir/adverse effects , Acute Kidney Injury/epidemiology , Aged , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/virology , Creatinine/blood , Drug Therapy, Combination , Female , Germany/epidemiology , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/therapeutic use , Incidence , Intensive Care Units , Lopinavir/therapeutic use , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
9.
Brain ; 144(4): 1263-1276, 2021 05 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1169654

ABSTRACT

During the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic, neurological symptoms increasingly moved into the focus of interest. In this prospective cohort study, we assessed neurological and cognitive symptoms in hospitalized coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) patients and aimed to determine their neuronal correlates. Patients with reverse transcription-PCR-confirmed COVID-19 infection who required inpatient treatment primarily because of non-neurological complications were screened between 20 April 2020 and 12 May 2020. Patients (age > 18 years) were included in our cohort when presenting with at least one new neurological symptom (defined as impaired gustation and/or olfaction, performance < 26 points on a Montreal Cognitive Assessment and/or pathological findings on clinical neurological examination). Patients with ≥2 new symptoms were eligible for further diagnostics using comprehensive neuropsychological tests, cerebral MRI and 18fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET as soon as infectivity was no longer present. Exclusion criteria were: premorbid diagnosis of cognitive impairment, neurodegenerative diseases or intensive care unit treatment. Of 41 COVID-19 inpatients screened, 29 patients (65.2 ± 14.4 years; 38% female) in the subacute stage of disease were included in the register. Most frequently, gustation and olfaction were disturbed in 29/29 and 25/29 patients, respectively. Montreal Cognitive Assessment performance was impaired in 18/26 patients (mean score 21.8/30) with emphasis on frontoparietal cognitive functions. This was confirmed by detailed neuropsychological testing in 15 patients. 18FDG PET revealed pathological results in 10/15 patients with predominant frontoparietal hypometabolism. This pattern was confirmed by comparison with a control sample using voxel-wise principal components analysis, which showed a high correlation (R2 = 0.62) with the Montreal Cognitive Assessment performance. Post-mortem examination of one patient revealed white matter microglia activation but no signs of neuroinflammation. Neocortical dysfunction accompanied by cognitive decline was detected in a relevant fraction of patients with subacute COVID-19 initially requiring inpatient treatment. This is of major rehabilitative and socioeconomic relevance.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , Cerebral Cortex/metabolism , Cognitive Dysfunction/metabolism , Glucose/metabolism , Mental Status and Dementia Tests , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/psychology , Cerebral Cortex/diagnostic imaging , Cognitive Dysfunction/diagnostic imaging , Cognitive Dysfunction/psychology , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Magnetic Resonance Imaging/methods , Male , Middle Aged , Positron-Emission Tomography/methods
10.
J Nucl Med ; 62(7): 910-915, 2021 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1167265

ABSTRACT

Cognitive impairment is a frequent complaint in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and can be related to cortical hypometabolism on 18F-FDG PET at the subacute stage. However, it is unclear if these changes are reversible. Methods: We prospectively assessed the Montreal Cognitive Assessment scores and 18F-FDG PET scans of 8 COVID-19 patients at the subacute stage (once no longer infectious) and the chronic stage (˜6 mo after symptom onset). The expression of the previously established COVID-19-related covariance pattern was analyzed at both stages to examine the time course of post-COVID-19 cognitive impairment. For further validation, we also conducted a conventional group analysis. Results: Follow-up 18F-FDG PET revealed that there was a significant reduction in the initial frontoparietal and, to a lesser extent, temporal hypometabolism and that this reduction was accompanied by a significant improvement in cognition. The expression of the previously established COVID-19-related pattern was significantly lower at follow-up and correlated inversely with Montreal Cognitive Assessment performance. However, both 18F-FDG PET and cognitive assessment suggest a residual impairment. Conclusion: Although a significant recovery of regional neuronal function and cognition can be clearly stated, residuals are still measurable in some patients 6 mo after manifestation of COVID-19. Given the current pandemic situation and tremendous uncertainty concerning the long-term effects of COVID-19, the present study provides novel insights of the highest medical and socioeconomic relevance.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/physiopathology , Cognitive Dysfunction/complications , Neocortex/physiopathology , Recovery of Function , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , Chronic Disease , Cognitive Dysfunction/physiopathology , Female , Fluorodeoxyglucose F18 , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Positron Emission Tomography Computed Tomography
11.
Dtsch Med Wochenschr ; 146(3): 162-166, 2021 Feb.
Article in German | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1054084

ABSTRACT

Corticosteroids have been found as useful adjunctive therapy in patients with various infections and hyperinflammation-associated disease. They are recommended in practice guidelines for patients with tuberculous and pneumococcal meningitis and patients with immune reconstitution syndrome associated with antiretroviral therapy. A new indication is severe COVID-19. Evidence from clinical trials is insufficient to allow the routine use of steroids among patients with septic shock, community-acquired pneumonia or tuberculous pericarditis.


Subject(s)
Adrenal Cortex Hormones/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , HIV Infections/complications , Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome/drug therapy , Meningitis, Pneumococcal/drug therapy , Tuberculosis, Meningeal/drug therapy , Brain Abscess/drug therapy , Chemotherapy, Adjuvant , HIV Infections/drug therapy , Humans , Sepsis/drug therapy , Severity of Illness Index , Shock, Septic/drug therapy , Spirochaetales Infections/drug therapy , Tuberculosis/drug therapy
12.
PLoS One ; 15(11): e0242127, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-922708

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Reported mortality of hospitalised Coronavirus Disease-2019 (COVID-19) patients varies substantially, particularly in critically ill patients. So far COVID-19 in-hospital mortality and modes of death under state of the art care have not been systematically studied. METHODS: This retrospective observational monocenter cohort study was performed after implementation of a non-restricted, dynamic tertiary care model at the University Medical Center Freiburg, an experienced acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and extracorporeal membrane-oxygenation (ECMO) referral center. All hospitalised patients with PCR-confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection were included. The primary endpoint was in-hospital mortality, secondary endpoints included major complications and modes of death. A multistate analysis and a Cox regression analysis for competing risk models were performed. Modes of death were determined by two independent reviewers. RESULTS: Between February 25, and May 8, 213 patients were included in the analysis. The median age was 65 years, 129 patients (61%) were male. 70 patients (33%) were admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU), of which 57 patients (81%) received mechanical ventilation and 23 patients (33%) ECMO support. Using multistate methodology, the estimated probability to die within 90 days after COVID-19 onset was 24% in the whole cohort. If the levels of care at time of study entry were accounted for, the probabilities to die were 16% if the patient was initially on a regular ward, 47% if in the intensive care unit (ICU) and 57% if mechanical ventilation was required at study entry. Age ≥65 years and male sex were predictors for in-hospital death. Predominant complications-as judged by two independent reviewers-determining modes of death were multi-organ failure, septic shock and thromboembolic and hemorrhagic complications. CONCLUSION: In a dynamic care model COVID-19-related in-hospital mortality remained very high. In the absence of potent antiviral agents, strategies to alleviate or prevent the identified complications should be investigated. In this context, multistate analyses enable comparison of models-of-care and treatment strategies and allow estimation and allocation of health care resources.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Hospital Mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation , Female , Germany/epidemiology , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Male , Middle Aged , Models, Statistical , Pandemics , Respiration, Artificial , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Tertiary Healthcare
13.
Front Immunol ; 11: 2086, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-771524

ABSTRACT

Immunosuppressive therapies increase the susceptibility of patients to infections. The current pandemic with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) compels clinicians to develop recommendations for successful clinical management and surveillance of immunocompromised patients at high risk for severe disease progression. With only few case studies published on SARS-CoV-2 infection in patients with rheumatic diseases, we report a 25-year-old male who developed moderate coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) with fever, mild dyspnea, and no major complications despite having received high-dose prednisolone, cyclophosphamide, and rituximab for the treatment of highly active, life-threatening eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (EGPA).


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/genetics , Churg-Strauss Syndrome/complications , Churg-Strauss Syndrome/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Cyclophosphamide/therapeutic use , Granulomatosis with Polyangiitis/complications , Granulomatosis with Polyangiitis/drug therapy , Immunosuppressive Agents/therapeutic use , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Adult , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Drug Therapy, Combination , Glucocorticoids/therapeutic use , Humans , Immunocompromised Host , Male , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Prednisolone/therapeutic use , RNA, Viral/genetics , Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction , Rituximab/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome
14.
Am J Transplant ; 20(11): 3239-3245, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-592123

ABSTRACT

In the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, organ transplant recipients are considered to be at high risk for an unfavorable outcome. However, in particular the role of immunosuppression in patients infected with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) remains undetermined. Here, we present a 62-year-old male COVID-19 patient with recent heart transplantation who developed only mild symptoms, but had prolonged virus shedding, and summarize the available data on COVID-19 in cardiac allograft recipients. Initially the patient presented with a transient episode of fever and sore throat but no other symptoms, in particular no cough or dyspnea at rest. After diagnosis, immunosuppression was continued unchanged. On day 7, his temperature increased again with concurrent mild rise of C-reactive protein, IL-6, and pro-B-type natriuretic peptide levels. Hydroxychloroquine was started and continued for 7 days. While the patient no longer had clinical symptoms 20 days after initial presentation, virus culture of throat swabs on days 18 and 21 confirmed active virus replication and SARS-CoV-2 PCR remained positive on day 35 with copy numbers similar to the onset of infection. In conclusion, the immunosuppression regimen in transplant recipients with mild COVID-19-associated symptoms may be continued unchanged. However, it may contribute to delayed virus polymerase chain reaction conversion and thus possible prolonged infectivity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Heart Failure/surgery , Heart Transplantation/methods , RNA, Viral/analysis , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Virus Shedding , Aged , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/virology , Comorbidity , Heart Failure/epidemiology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Transplant Recipients
15.
Dtsch Med Wochenschr ; 145(12): 844-849, 2020 06.
Article in German | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-247177

ABSTRACT

PATIENT HISTORY AND CLINICAL FINDINGS: A 46-year old construction worker presented at the emergency department with two orthostatic syncopes. The patient complained of prolonged fever and coughs for 7 days which had not improved after oral treatment with sultamicillin for 5 days, prescribed by the patient's general practitioner. Physical examination showed high blood pressure due to previously known hypertension. Other vital signs without pathological findings. Pulmonary auscultation showed basal soft crackling noises of the left lung FINDINGS AND DIAGNOSIS: Laboratory examination showed increased values for LDH, pro-BNP and CRP and normal values for leucocytes and procalcitonin. Conventional X-Ray of the chest showed bipulmonal lateral atypical infiltrates. After the first PCR turned in negative another PCR-analysis for SARS-CoV-2 of a deep oral swab-sample was performed since the clinical, laboratory and radiological findings were typical for COVID-19. Again, SARS-CoV-2-RNA was not detected. A CT-scan of the chest showed bipulmonal lateral ground-glass attenuation, again typical for COVID-19 associated pneumonia. After a third attempt for a PCR-analysis of a deep oral swab-sample was negative, analysis of a sputum was performed which finally confirmed the diagnosis of COVID-19 associated pneumonia. THERAPY AND COURSE OF EVENTS: The patient was admitted for evaluation of syncopes and suspect of COVID-19 associated pneumonia. The patient was prophylactically isolated while the result of SARS-CoV-2-PCR from a deep oral swab was pending. Suspecting a possible secondary bacterial infection at the beginning, intravenous antibiotic treatment with ampicillin/sulbactam was initiated. While further examinations showed no indication for bacterial infection, antibiotics were discontinued after 3 days. Due to clinical recovery antiviral therapy was not performed after confirming the diagnosis. The patient was discharged 17 days after onset of first symptoms without any requirements for further isolation. CONCLUSION: This casuistic describes a case of COVID-19 associated pneumonia presenting with typical clinical features, laboratory and radiological findings. Detection of viral RNA was not successful from deep oral swab-samples despite repeated attempts. Finally, PCR-analysis of sputum confirmed the diagnosis. Analysis of deeper airway samples (sputum, bronchoalveolar lavage, tracheal secretions) or stool for SARS-CoV-2 should be performed in cases of evident clinical suspicion of COVID-19 and negative PCR results from deep oral swabs.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Oropharynx/virology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS Virus/isolation & purification , Sputum/virology , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , Clinical Laboratory Techniques , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , RNA, Viral/isolation & purification , SARS Virus/genetics
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL