Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 5 de 5
Filter
1.
Infect Drug Resist ; 15: 1667-1676, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1793348

ABSTRACT

Purpose: Secondary infections (SI) in COVID-19 have been documented from 3.6% to 72% in various studies with mortality ranging from 8.1% to 57.6%. There is a gap in knowledge for clinico-epidemio-microbilogical association among COVID-19 patients with concomitant SI. Patients and Methods: This is a retrospective chart review, in central India. The study was undertaken for hospitalized adult patients during 1st June 2020 to 30th November 2020, with laboratory proven COVID-19 infection and secondary infection. Results: Out of the total 2338 number of patients, only 265 (11.3%) patients were investigated for microbiological identification of SI. Male gender was predominant (76.8%) and the mean age was 53.7 ± 17.8 years. Only 3.5% (82/2338) of patients were having microbiologically confirmed (bacterial or fungal) SI. The overall mortality was 50.9% (54/82) with a differential mortality of 88.8% (48/54) in high-priority areas and 21.4% (6/28) in low-priority areas. Blood was the most commonly investigated sample (56%) followed by urine (20.7%) and respiratory secretion (15.8%). A. baumanii complex (20/82, 24.3%) was the most common bacteria isolated followed by K. pneumonia (12/82, 14.6%) and E. coli (11/82, 13.4%). Candida spp. (20/82, 24.3%) was the most common fungal pathogen isolated. Sixty percent (12/20) of Acinetobacter spp. were carbapenam-resistant and 70.3% of Enterobacterales were carbapenam-resistant. Fluconazole resistant Candid a spp. was isolated only in 10% (2/20) of cases. Diabetes was the most common co-morbidity 54.8% (45/82) followed by hypertension (41.4%) and chronic heart disease (13.4%). The negative predictors of secondary infections are urinary catheterization, placement of central line and mechanical ventilation (invasive and non-invasive). Conclusion: There is an urgent need of better anti-microbial stewardship practices in India (institutional and extra institutional) for curtailment of secondary infection rates particularly among COVID-19 patients.

2.
Infection and drug resistance ; 15:1667-1676, 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1787249

ABSTRACT

Purpose Secondary infections (SI) in COVID-19 have been documented from 3.6% to 72% in various studies with mortality ranging from 8.1% to 57.6%. There is a gap in knowledge for clinico–epidemio-microbilogical association among COVID-19 patients with concomitant SI. Patients and Methods This is a retrospective chart review, in central India. The study was undertaken for hospitalized adult patients during 1st June 2020 to 30th November 2020, with laboratory proven COVID-19 infection and secondary infection. Results Out of the total 2338 number of patients, only 265 (11.3%) patients were investigated for microbiological identification of SI. Male gender was predominant (76.8%) and the mean age was 53.7 ± 17.8 years. Only 3.5% (82/2338) of patients were having microbiologically confirmed (bacterial or fungal) SI. The overall mortality was 50.9% (54/82) with a differential mortality of 88.8% (48/54) in high-priority areas and 21.4% (6/28) in low-priority areas. Blood was the most commonly investigated sample (56%) followed by urine (20.7%) and respiratory secretion (15.8%). A. baumanii complex (20/82, 24.3%) was the most common bacteria isolated followed by K. pneumonia (12/82, 14.6%) and E. coli (11/82, 13.4%). Candida spp. (20/82, 24.3%) was the most common fungal pathogen isolated. Sixty percent (12/20) of Acinetobacter spp. were carbapenam-resistant and 70.3% of Enterobacterales were carbapenam-resistant. Fluconazole resistant Candida spp. was isolated only in 10% (2/20) of cases. Diabetes was the most common co-morbidity 54.8% (45/82) followed by hypertension (41.4%) and chronic heart disease (13.4%). The negative predictors of secondary infections are urinary catheterization, placement of central line and mechanical ventilation (invasive and non-invasive). Conclusion There is an urgent need of better anti-microbial stewardship practices in India (institutional and extra institutional) for curtailment of secondary infection rates particularly among COVID-19 patients.

4.
Infect Drug Resist ; 14: 1893-1903, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1256162

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Critically ill coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients need hospitalization which increases their risk of acquiring secondary bacterial and fungal infections. The practice of empiric antimicrobial prescription, due to limited diagnostic capabilities of many hospitals, has the potential to escalate an already worrisome antimicrobial resistance (AMR) situation in India. This study reports the prevalence and profiles of secondary infections (SIs) and clinical outcomes in hospitalized COVID-19 patients in India. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A retrospective study of secondary infections in patients admitted in intensive care units (ICUs) and wards of ten hospitals of the Indian Council of Medical Research (ICMR) AMR surveillance network, between June and August 2020, was undertaken. The demographic data, time of infection after admission, microbiological and antimicrobial resistance data of secondary infections, and clinical outcome data of the admitted COVID-19 patients were collated. RESULTS: Out of 17,534 admitted patients, 3.6% of patients developed secondary bacterial or fungal infections. The mortality among patients who developed secondary infections was 56.7% against an overall mortality of 10.6% in total admitted COVID-19 patients. Gram-negative bacteria were isolated from 78% of patients. Klebsiella pneumoniae (29%) was the predominant pathogen, followed by Acinetobacter baumannii (21%). Thirty-five percent of patients reported polymicrobial infections, including fungal infections. High levels of carbapenem resistance was seen in A. baumannii (92.6%) followed by K. pneumoniae (72.8%). CONCLUSION: Predominance of Gram-negative pathogens in COVID-19 patients coupled with high rates of resistance to higher generation antimicrobials is an alarming finding. A high rate of mortality in patients with secondary infections warrants extra caution to improve the infection control practices and practice of antimicrobial stewardship interventions not only to save patient lives but also prevent selection of drug-resistant infections, to which the current situation is very conducive.

5.
Indian J Med Microbiol ; 38(1): 9-17, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-688963

ABSTRACT

High-throughput, accurate, cost-effective and rapid testing for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS CoV-2) is the need of the hour in face of the global coronavirus disease pandemic. This target is achievable, within a relatively short time through capacity building of reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) tests by utilising the strengths of intra and inter institutional networks. These networks act as force multiplier for vital resources which are required for capacity building, namely, leadership, expertise, equipment, space, infection control inputs and human resources. In this article, we report the experience of capacity building for delivery of RT-PCR tests for SARS CoV-2 from a cancer hospital in Eastern India. The relevance, mode of operation and value addition of this essential public health service are discussed in the context of inter departmental collaboration and interaction with other institutes through the existing diagnostic, surveillance and infection control networks. This networking model for service development and delivery could be used by other centres.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Capacity Building/organization & administration , Clinical Laboratory Techniques/methods , Community Networks/organization & administration , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Diagnostic Services/organization & administration , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction/methods , Betacoronavirus/genetics , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , Humans , India , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL