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1.
PLoS One ; 16(9): e0249740, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1403293

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Central to measuring the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on HIV is understanding the role of loss of access to essential HIV prevention and care services created by clinic and community-based organization closures. In this paper, we use a comprehensive list of HIV prevention services in four corridors of the US heavily impacted by HIV, developed as part of a large RCT, to illustrate the potential impact of service closure on LGBTQ+ youth. METHODS: We identified and mapped LGBTQ+ friendly services offering at least one of the following HIV-related services: HIV testing; STI testing; PrEP/PEP; HIV treatment and care; and other HIV-related services in 109 counties across four major interstate corridors heavily affected by HIV US Census regions: Pacific (San Francisco, CA to San Diego, CA); South-Atlantic (Washington, DC to Atlanta, GA); East-North-Central (Chicago, IL to Detroit, MI); and East-South-Central (Memphis, TN to New Orleans, LA). RESULTS: There were a total of 831 LGBTQ+ youth-friendly HIV service providers across the 109 counties. There was a range of LGBTQ+ youth-friendly HIV-service provider availability across counties (range: 0-14.33 per 10,000 youth aged 13-24 (IQR: 2.13), median: 1.09); 9 (8.26%) analyzed counties did not have any LGBTQ+ youth-friendly HIV service providers. The Pearson correlation coefficient for the correlation between county HIV prevalence and LGBTQ+ youth-friendly HIV service provider density was 0.16 (p = 0.09), suggesting only a small, non-statistically significant linear relationship between a county's available LGBTQ+ youth-friendly HIV service providers and their HIV burden. CONCLUSIONS: As the COVID-19 pandemic continues, we must find novel, affordable ways to continue to provide sexual health, mental health and other support services to LGBTQ+ youth.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Delivery of Health Care/methods , HIV Infections/prevention & control , Pandemics , Sexual and Gender Minorities/education , Adolescent , Adult , Humans , Prevalence , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , United States/epidemiology , Young Adult
2.
Am J Mens Health ; 15(3): 15579883211022180, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1259149

ABSTRACT

Little is known about the impact of the coronavirus pandemic and control measures on gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (GBMSM) couples. The goal of this study was to investigate individual-level relationship satisfaction during the COVID-19 pandemic in a sample of 209 coupled GBMSM in the United States. We analyzed reported happiness and feelings about a relationship's future and assessed the odds of changing relationship happiness and investment associated with pandemic-related life changes (pandemic-related employment change; COVID-19 illness; high-risk of severe illness), using logistic and multinomial logit models. Fifty-five percent of participants (N = 114) reported that their relationship happiness had not changed during the pandemic, but 30% (N = 62) reported increased relationship happiness. 25% (N = 53) reported they had become more invested in their relationship's future during the pandemic, and only one participant reported decreased investment. The odds of increased relationship investment was significantly associated with pandemic-related employment change (adjusted odds ratio (aOR), 95% confidence interval (CI): 2.19 [1.04, 4.61]) and increased sex during the pandemic (aOR: 4.38 [1.55, 12.41]). Those with a pandemic-related employment change also had significantly higher odds of increased relationship happiness than those without a change (aOR: 2.10 [1.01, 4.35]). COVID-19 cases that reported being at higher risk of serious COVID-19 disease had higher odds of decreased relationship happiness than high-risk non-cases (aOR: 6.58 [1.10, 39.39]). Additional research in this area is warranted to minimize the long-term impacts of the pandemic on coupled GBMSM.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Homosexuality, Male/psychology , Mental Health/statistics & numerical data , Personal Satisfaction , Physical Distancing , Sexual and Gender Minorities/psychology , Adult , Happiness , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Sexual Behavior/psychology , United States
3.
J Interpers Violence ; 37(15-16): NP14166-NP14188, 2022 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1192167

ABSTRACT

In addition to the growing morbidity and mortality related to the 2019 novel coronavirus (SAR-CoV-2) pandemic, social distancing measures during the pandemic may result in increased intimate partner violence (IPV). However, it is yet unknown if gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (GBMSM)'s IPV risk has increased during this time. This article describes and analyzes IPV experiences during the COVID-19 pandemic in a sample of coupled-GBMSM in the United States. We hypothesized that pandemic-driven stressors would be associated with increased IPV prevalence and severity. A sample of 214 coupled men living in the US who had previously participated in HIV-related couple studies was surveyed in July-September 2020. Respondents reported demographic, sexual and substance use behaviors, and relationship characteristics. Surveys also collected data on pandemic-related life-changes (employment, substance use, COVID-19 illness). IPV victimization and perpetration were measured with the Gay and Bisexual Men Intimate Partner Violence scale and measured individually experienced or perpetrated violence, sexual, emotional, monitoring, or controlling behaviors, and if a given behavior was new and/or had changed in frequency during the pandemic. Reported prevalence and pandemic-related changes in victimization and perpetration were described. New or more frequent IPV victimization was modeled against employment, substance use changes, COVID-19 illness, and outside sexual partners (modified by a couple's sexual agreement). IPV perpetration prevalence was 15.17%, 34.44% of which was new or more frequent. Victimization prevalence was 14.95%, of which 46.88% was new or more frequent. After adjustment, outside sexual partners were associated with IPV among those with nonmonogamous sexual agreements; each outside sexual partner increased the odds of new or more frequent victimization by 70% (OR = 1.70; 95% CI [1.16, 2.51]). Given this study's documented rise in IPV among a sample of coupled men, additional research into IPV predictors, interventions, and support strategies in GBMSM populations are warranted.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Intimate Partner Violence , Sexual and Gender Minorities , Substance-Related Disorders , COVID-19/epidemiology , Homosexuality, Male , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Prevalence , Risk Factors , United States/epidemiology
4.
AIDS Behav ; 25(11): 3798-3803, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1188122

ABSTRACT

Sexual agreements are an important element of HIV prevention for many partnered gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (GBMSM). This study describes sexual agreement and sexual behavior changes during the 2020 pandemic among a sample of 215 coupled US GBMSM. Overall, reported behavior shifted towards monogamy. Fifteen percent of respondents developed/ended/changed their agreement during the pandemic; the pandemic factored into 85% of reported changes. Individuals reported fewer outside sexual partners compared to the 3 months pre-pandemic. More research is needed to investigate shifting behavior and associated risk in order to adapt HIV services during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , HIV Infections , Sexual and Gender Minorities , HIV Infections/epidemiology , HIV Infections/prevention & control , Homosexuality, Male , Humans , Male , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Sexual Behavior , Sexual Partners
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