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1.
Ieee Transactions on Emerging Topics in Computational Intelligence ; : 10, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1978407

ABSTRACT

The upheaval brought by the arrival of the COVID-19 pandemic has continued to bring fresh challenges over the past two years. During this COVID-19 pandemic, there has been a need for rapid identification of infected patients and specific delineation of infection areas in computed tomography (CT) images. Although deep supervised learning methods have been established quickly, the scarcity of both image-level and pixel-level labels as well as the lack of explainable transparency still hinder the applicability of AI. Can we identify infected patients and delineate the infections with extreme minimal supervision? Semi-supervised learning has demonstrated promising performance under limited labelled data and sufficient unlabelled data. Inspired by semi-supervised learning, we propose a model-agnostic calibrated pseudo-labelling strategy and apply it under a consistency regularization framework to generate explainable identification and delineation results. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our model with the combination of limited labelled data and sufficient unlabelled data or weakly-labelled data. Extensive experiments have shown that our model can efficiently utilize limited labelled data and provide explainable classification and segmentation results for decision-making in clinical routine.

2.
British Journal of Dermatology ; 186(6):e257, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1956712

ABSTRACT

A 27-year-old man presented to Accident and Emergency with an itchy rash over the thighs and buttocks. This followed 2 days of fever, headache and malaise. His past medical history was unremarkable and there was no regular medication use. He was unvaccinated. There was no history of previous erythema multiforme (EM) or herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection. He was febrile but otherwise haemodynamically stable. Clinically, over the thighs and buttocks there was a symmetrical rash consisting of striking urticated targetoid lesions. Some had a dusky centre and had coalesced over the thighs. There was no mucosal involvement. A SARS-CoV-2 polymerase chain reaction test was positive. Mycoplasma serology and swabs for HSV were negative. Other bloods were unremarkable. A skin biopsy from affected skin showed spongiosis and a mild dermal lymphocytic infiltrate. There was an absence of necrotic keratinocytes. He was treated with 5 days of prednisolone (30 mg) and potent topical steroids. There was complete clinical resolution of the rash in a week. In the published literature there are a small number of EM-like eruptions in the context of COVID-19 infection. Similar to our patient, skin biopsies often show features not typical of EM, including spongiosis and a lymphocytic perivascular and interstitial infiltrate (Torrelo A, Andina D, Santonja C et al. Erythema multiforme-like lesions in children and COVID-19.

3.
BJOG-AN INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF OBSTETRICS AND GYNAECOLOGY ; 129:153-153, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1905430
4.
British Journal of Dermatology ; 186(6):E257-E257, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1885194
5.
Brain Injury ; 36(SUPPL 1):106-107, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1815748

ABSTRACT

Background: Communicative rehabilitation can be complex and challenging for children with an acquired brain injury (ABI) who use augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) systems. The development of communicative competence (CC) in children with use AAC systems is in itself complex and multifaceted (Light, 1989, Light and McNaughton, 2014) and it can be challenging for clinicians to target multiple competencies effectively through direct intervention. The Brick-by-Brick™ programme (previously known as LEGObased therapyR) has an evidence base routed in research with verbal young people with Autism Spectrum Condition. The programme is a collaborative play therapy originally designed as a social intervention to target the development of social communication and interaction skills (LeGoff, 2004). Introduction: The presentation aims to explore a use of the Brick-by-Brick™ programme with children with ABI who use AAC to support or replace their verbal communication, as well as the areas of potential clinical need for adaptations to its delivery to increase access for this client group. It will also discuss the theory behind adaptations and the need for evidence to support decision making clinically around this topic. The aims and methods of the presenter's current research will be discussed using Janice Light's framework of communicative competence (Light, 1989;Light and McNaughton, 2012) to discuss areas of competence during the presentation. Methods: The research agenda of an embedded quasiexperimental mixed methods design will be shared, along with considerations for the commencement of data collection in a country still significantly affected by the health, social, and educational repercussions of the Covid-19 pandemic. Clinical adaptations to the programme made by the presenter in her role as highly specialist speech and language therapist will be discussed and linked to her current research. Discussion, Conclusions and Recommendations: Adapting the delivery of the Brick-by-Brick™ programme for use with AAC users with ABI is not without difficulties, but these are not insurmountable. Practical and theoretical recommendations for the adaptation of the programme in both educational and healthcare rehabilitation settings will be shared. Future thoughts on the development of the current research base will also be discussed.

6.
Annals of Surgical Oncology ; 29(SUPPL 1):120-120, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1812697
7.
PubMed; 2021.
Preprint in English | PubMed | ID: ppcovidwho-333779

ABSTRACT

IMPORTANCE: Identification of SARS-CoV-2 infection via antibody assays is important for monitoring natural infection rates. Most antibody assays cannot distinguish natural infection from vaccination. OBJECTIVE: To assess the accuracy of a nucleocapsid-containing assay in identifying natural infection among vaccinated individuals. DESIGN: A longitudinal cohort comprised of healthcare workers (HCW) in the Minneapolis/St. Paul metropolitan area was enrolled. Two rounds of seroprevalence studies separated by one month were conducted from 11/2020-1/2021. Capillary blood from round 1 and 2 was tested for IgG antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 spike proteins with a qualitative chemiluminescent ELISA (spike-only assay). In a subsample of participants (n=82) at round 2, a second assay was performed that measured IgGs reactive to SARS-CoV-2 nucleocapsid protein (nucleocapsid-containing assay). Round 1 biospecimen collections occurred prior to vaccination in all participants. Vaccination status at round 2 was determined via self-report. SETTING: The Minneapolis/St. Paul, Minnesota metropolitan area. PARTICIPANTS: HCW age 18-80 years. EXPOSURES: Round 1 recent SARS-CoV-2 infection assessed via a spike-only assay and participant self-report. OUTCOMES: Round 2 SARS-CoV-2 infection assessed via the nucleocapsid-containing assay. Area under the curve (AUC) was computed to determine the discriminatory ability of round 2 IgG reactivity to nucleocapsid for identification of recent infection determined during round 1. RESULTS: Participants had a mean age of 40 (range=23-66) years, 83% were female, 46% reported vaccination prior to the round 2 testing. Round 1 seroprevalence was 9.5%. Among those not recently infected, when comparing vaccinated vs. unvaccinated individuals, elevated levels of spike 1 (p<0.001) and spike 2 (p=0.01) were observed while nucleocapsid levels were not statistically significantly different (p=0.90). Among all participants, nucleocapsid response predicted recent infection with an AUC(95%CI) of 0.93(0.88,0.99). Among individuals vaccinated >10 days prior to antibody testing, the specificity of the nucleocapsid-containing assay was 92% and while the specificity of the spike-only assay was 0%. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: An IgG assay identifying reactivity to nucleocapsid protein is an accurate predictor of natural infection among vaccinated individuals while a spike-only assay performed poorly. In the era of SARS-CoV-2 vaccination, seroprevalence studies monitoring natural infection will require assays that do not rely on spike-protein response alone.

8.
EuropePMC; 2022.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-330329

ABSTRACT

Introduction Shared characteristics between COVID-19 and pulmonary fibrosis, including symptoms, genetic architecture, and circulating biomarkers, suggests interstitial lung disease (ILD) development may be associated with SARS-CoV-2 infection. Methods The UKILD Post-COVID study planned interim analysis was designed to stratify risk groups and estimate the prevalence of Post-COVID Interstitial Lung Damage (ILDam) using the Post-HOSPitalisation COVID-19 (PHOSP-COVID) Study. Demographics, radiological patterns and missing data were assessed descriptively. Bayes binomial regression was used to estimate the risk ratio of persistent lung damage >10% involvement in linked, clinically indicated CT scans. Indexing thresholds of percent predicted DLco, chest X-ray findings and severity of admission were used to generate risk strata. Number of cases within strata were used to estimate the amount of suspected Post-COVID ILDam. Results A total 3702 people were included in the UKILD interim cohort, 2406 completed an early follow-up research visit within 240 days of discharge and 1296 had follow-up through routine clinical review. We linked the cohort to 87 clinically indicated CTs with visually scored radiological patterns (median 119 days;interquartile range 83 to 155, max 240), of which 74 people had ILDam. ILDam was associated with abnormal chest X-ray (RR 1.21 95%CrI 1.05;1.40), percent predicted DLco<80% (RR 1.25 95%CrI 1.00;1.56) and severe admission (RR 1.27 95%CrI 1.07;1.55). A risk index based on these features suggested 6.9% of the interim cohort had moderate to very-high risk of Post-COVID ILDam. Comparable radiological patterns were observed in repeat scans >90 days in a subset of participants. Conclusion These interim data highlight that ILDam was not uncommon in clinically indicated thoracic CT up to 8 months following SARS-CoV-2 hospitalisation. Whether the ILDam will progress to ILD is currently unknown, however health services should radiologically and physiologically monitor individuals who have Post-COVID ILDam risk factors.

9.
International Journal of Travel Medicine and Global Health ; 9(4):149-154, 2021.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1727448

ABSTRACT

Asthma is a very prevalent condition. A significant proportion of patients with asthma will engage in travel for work or leisure purposes. Patients may be fearful of travel, especially during the current COVID-19 global pandemic. However, there are health benefits to be obtained, including leaving an area of high air pollution and travelling to an area of lower air pollution, travelling to high altitude, the beneficial effects of a low trigger environment and the psychological benefits associated with travel. Travel can be associated with improved diet and increased vitamin D exposure. Caution should be taken with alcohol consumption as it may worsen asthma. Whilst bariatric surgery has been shown to improve asthma symptoms and control, there are dangers associated with bariatric surgery tourism that the traveller should be made aware of. Travellers with asthma may experience jet lag and a worsening in their symptoms. Caution is required around exogenous melatonin use. Optimal asthma control pre-travel is essential. The destination should be carefully considered, in terms of air pollution, altitude and possible environmental triggers. Pre-travel, written asthma management plans should be reviewed and updated if necessary. Patients should carry more asthma medications than they think is necessary, including oral corticosteroids and a pressurised metered dose inhaler via spacer. Travellers with asthma should have a self-management plan in the event of exacerbations occurring during travel.

10.
Ir J Psychol Med ; : 1-9, 2022 Feb 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1707591

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To examine levels of psychological distress among higher education students in Ireland overall and across a range of personal, higher education, and socioeconomic characteristics, prior to the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A cross-sectional online survey of college students in Ireland was undertaken in 2018. Data on 5201 students from 13 higher education institutions (HEIs) were analyzed. Stress, anxiety, and depression symptom scores based on the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS-21) were calculated and reported, with statistical testing used to compare across groups. RESULTS: Overall, 29.6% and 19.1% of respondents were classified in the mild to moderate and severe to extremely severe range for depression respectively. The corresponding proportions were 25.9% and 20.7% for anxiety, and 24.5% and 14.8% for stress. Differences across groups included higher levels of psychological distress for transgender and female students compared to males (p < 0.01), for gay/lesbian/bisexual students compared to heterosexuals (p < 0.01), for undergraduates compared to postgraduates (p < 0.01), for students from intermediate/technical/service/unskilled social classes compared to professional/self-employed social classes (p < 0.01), and for those with financial difficulties compared to those without financial difficulties (p < 0.01). CONCLUSIONS: Rates of psychological distress were high amongst college students in Ireland prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, with substantial differences across groups. Due to study limitations, such as possible selection bias, the findings need replication. Further research is needed to determine the impact of the pandemic on the prevalence of mental illness in this population.

13.
McCrone, J. T.; Hill, V.; Bajaj, S.; Pena, R. E.; Lambert, B. C.; Inward, R.; Bhatt, S.; Volz, E.; Ruis, C.; Dellicour, S.; Baele, G.; Zarebski, A. E.; Sadilek, A.; Wu, N.; Schneider, A.; Ji, X.; Raghwani, J.; Jackson, B.; Colquhoun, R.; O'Toole, Á, Peacock, T. P.; Twohig, K.; Thelwall, S.; Dabrera, G.; Myers, R.; Faria, N. R.; Huber, C.; Bogoch, I. I.; Khan, K.; du Plessis, L.; Barrett, J. C.; Aanensen, D. M.; Barclay, W. S.; Chand, M.; Connor, T.; Loman, N. J.; Suchard, M. A.; Pybus, O. G.; Rambaut, A.; Kraemer, M. U. G.; Robson, S. C.; Connor, T. R.; Loman, N. J.; Golubchik, T.; Martinez Nunez, R. T.; Bonsall, D.; Rambaut, A.; Snell, L. B.; Livett, R.; Ludden, C.; Corden, S.; Nastouli, E.; Nebbia, G.; Johnston, I.; Lythgoe, K.; Estee Torok, M.; Goodfellow, I. G.; Prieto, J. A.; Saeed, K.; Jackson, D. K.; Houlihan, C.; Frampton, D.; Hamilton, W. L.; Witney, A. A.; Bucca, G.; Pope, C. F.; Moore, C.; Thomson, E. C.; Harrison, E. M.; Smith, C. P.; Rogan, F.; Beckwith, S. M.; Murray, A.; Singleton, D.; Eastick, K.; Sheridan, L. A.; Randell, P.; Jackson, L. M.; Ariani, C. V.; Gonçalves, S.; Fairley, D. J.; Loose, M. W.; Watkins, J.; Moses, S.; Nicholls, S.; Bull, M.; Amato, R.; Smith, D. L.; Aanensen, D. M.; Barrett, J. C.; Aggarwal, D.; Shepherd, J. G.; Curran, M. D.; Parmar, S.; Parker, M. D.; Williams, C.; Glaysher, S.; Underwood, A. P.; Bashton, M.; Pacchiarini, N.; Loveson, K. F.; Byott, M.; Carabelli, A. M.; Templeton, K. E.; de Silva, T. I.; Wang, D.; Langford, C. F.; Sillitoe, J.; Gunson, R. N.; Cottrell, S.; O'Grady, J.; Kwiatkowski, D.; Lillie, P. J.; Cortes, N.; Moore, N.; Thomas, C.; Burns, P. J.; Mahungu, T. W.; Liggett, S.; Beckett, A. H.; Holden, M. T. G.; Levett, L. J.; Osman, H.; Hassan-Ibrahim, M. O.; Simpson, D. A.; Chand, M.; Gupta, R. K.; Darby, A. C.; Paterson, S.; Pybus, O. G.; Volz, E. M.; de Angelis, D.; Robertson, D. L.; Page, A. J.; Martincorena, I.; Aigrain, L.; Bassett, A. R.; Wong, N.; Taha, Y.; Erkiert, M. J.; Spencer Chapman, M. H.; Dewar, R.; McHugh, M. P.; Mookerjee, S.; Aplin, S.; Harvey, M.; Sass, T.; Umpleby, H.; Wheeler, H.; McKenna, J. P.; Warne, B.; Taylor, J. F.; Chaudhry, Y.; Izuagbe, R.; Jahun, A. S.; Young, G. R.; McMurray, C.; McCann, C. M.; Nelson, A.; Elliott, S.; Lowe, H.; Price, A.; Crown, M. R.; Rey, S.; Roy, S.; Temperton, B.; Shaaban, S.; Hesketh, A. R.; Laing, K. G.; Monahan, I. M.; Heaney, J.; Pelosi, E.; Silviera, S.; Wilson-Davies, E.; Fryer, H.; Adams, H.; du Plessis, L.; Johnson, R.; Harvey, W. T.; Hughes, J.; Orton, R. J.; Spurgin, L. G.; Bourgeois, Y.; Ruis, C.; O'Toole, Á, Gourtovaia, M.; Sanderson, T.; Fraser, C.; Edgeworth, J.; Breuer, J.; Michell, S. L.; Todd, J. A.; John, M.; Buck, D.; Gajee, K.; Kay, G. L.; Peacock, S. J.; Heyburn, D.; Kitchman, K.; McNally, A.; Pritchard, D. T.; Dervisevic, S.; Muir, P.; Robinson, E.; Vipond, B. B.; Ramadan, N. A.; Jeanes, C.; Weldon, D.; Catalan, J.; Jones, N.; da Silva Filipe, A.; Williams, C.; Fuchs, M.; Miskelly, J.; Jeffries, A. R.; Oliver, K.; Park, N. R.; Ash, A.; Koshy, C.; Barrow, M.; Buchan, S. L.; Mantzouratou, A.; Clark, G.; Holmes, C. W.; Campbell, S.; Davis, T.; Tan, N. K.; Brown, J. R.; Harris, K. A.; Kidd, S. P.; Grant, P. R.; Xu-McCrae, L.; Cox, A.; Madona, P.; Pond, M.; Randell, P. A.; Withell, K. T.; Williams, C.; Graham, C.; Denton-Smith, R.; Swindells, E.; Turnbull, R.; Sloan, T. J.; Bosworth, A.; Hutchings, S.; Pymont, H. M.; Casey, A.; Ratcliffe, L.; Jones, C. R.; Knight, B. A.; Haque, T.; Hart, J.; Irish-Tavares, D.; Witele, E.; Mower, C.; Watson, L. K.; Collins, J.; Eltringham, G.; Crudgington, D.; Macklin, B.; Iturriza-Gomara, M.; Lucaci, A. O.; McClure, P. C.; Carlile, M.; Holmes, N.; Moore, C.; Storey, N.; Rooke, S.; Yebra, G.; Craine, N.; Perry, M.; Alikhan, N. F.; Bridgett, S.; Cook, K. F.; Fearn, C.; Goudarzi, S.; Lyons, R. A.; Williams, T.; Haldenby, S. T.; Durham, J.; Leonard, S.; Davies, R. M.; Batra, R.; Blane, B.; Spyer, M. J.; Smith, P.; Yavus, M.; Williams, R. J.; Mahanama, A. I. K.; Samaraweera, B.; Girgis, S. T.; Hansford, S. E.; Green, A.; Beaver, C.; Bellis, K. L.; Dorman, M. J.; Kay, S.; Prestwood, L.; Rajatileka, S.; Quick, J.; Poplawski, R.; Reynolds, N.; Mack, A.; Morriss, A.; Whalley, T.; Patel, B.; Georgana, I.; Hosmillo, M.; Pinckert, M. L.; Stockton, J.; Henderson, J. H.; Hollis, A.; Stanley, W.; Yew, W. C.; Myers, R.; Thornton, A.; Adams, A.; Annett, T.; Asad, H.; Birchley, A.; Coombes, J.; Evans, J. M.; Fina, L.; Gatica-Wilcox, B.; Gilbert, L.; Graham, L.; Hey, J.; Hilvers, E.; Jones, S.; Jones, H.; Kumziene-Summerhayes, S.; McKerr, C.; Powell, J.; Pugh, G.; Taylor, S.; Trotter, A. J.; Williams, C. A.; Kermack, L. M.; Foulkes, B. H.; Gallis, M.; Hornsby, H. R.; Louka, S. F.; Pohare, M.; Wolverson, P.; Zhang, P.; MacIntyre-Cockett, G.; Trebes, A.; Moll, R. J.; Ferguson, L.; Goldstein, E. J.; Maclean, A.; Tomb, R.; Starinskij, I.; Thomson, L.; Southgate, J.; Kraemer, M. U. G.; Raghwani, J.; Zarebski, A. E.; Boyd, O.; Geidelberg, L.; Illingworth, C. J.; Jackson, C.; Pascall, D.; Vattipally, S.; Freeman, T. M.; Hsu, S. N.; Lindsey, B. B.; James, K.; Lewis, K.; Tonkin-Hill, G.; Tovar-Corona, J. M.; Cox, M.; Abudahab, K.; Menegazzo, M.; Taylor, B. E. W.; Yeats, C. A.; Mukaddas, A.; Wright, D. W.; de Oliveira Martins, L.; Colquhoun, R.; Hill, V.; Jackson, B.; McCrone, J. T.; Medd, N.; Scher, E.; Keatley, J. P.; Curran, T.; Morgan, S.; Maxwell, P.; Smith, K.; Eldirdiri, S.; Kenyon, A.; Holmes, A. H.; Price, J. R.; Wyatt, T.; Mather, A. E.; Skvortsov, T.; Hartley, J. A.; Guest, M.; Kitchen, C.; Merrick, I.; Munn, R.; Bertolusso, B.; Lynch, J.; Vernet, G.; Kirk, S.; Wastnedge, E.; Stanley, R.; Idle, G.; Bradley, D. T.; Poyner, J.; Mori, M.; Jones, O.; Wright, V.; Brooks, E.; Churcher, C. M.; Fragakis, M.; Galai, K.; Jermy, A.; Judges, S.; McManus, G. M.; Smith, K. S.; Westwick, E.; Attwood, S. W.; Bolt, F.; Davies, A.; De Lacy, E.; Downing, F.; Edwards, S.; Meadows, L.; Jeremiah, S.; Smith, N.; Foulser, L.; Charalampous, T.; Patel, A.; Berry, L.; Boswell, T.; Fleming, V. M.; Howson-Wells, H. C.; Joseph, A.; Khakh, M.; Lister, M. M.; Bird, P. W.; Fallon, K.; Helmer, T.; McMurray, C. L.; Odedra, M.; Shaw, J.; Tang, J. W.; Willford, N. J.; Blakey, V.; Raviprakash, V.; Sheriff, N.; Williams, L. A.; Feltwell, T.; Bedford, L.; Cargill, J. S.; Hughes, W.; Moore, J.; Stonehouse, S.; Atkinson, L.; Lee, J. C. D.; Shah, D.; Alcolea-Medina, A.; Ohemeng-Kumi, N.; Ramble, J.; Sehmi, J.; Williams, R.; Chatterton, W.; Pusok, M.; Everson, W.; Castigador, A.; Macnaughton, E.; El Bouzidi, K.; Lampejo, T.; Sudhanva, M.; Breen, C.; Sluga, G.; Ahmad, S. S. Y.; George, R. P.; Machin, N. W.; Binns, D.; James, V.; Blacow, R.; Coupland, L.; Smith, L.; Barton, E.; Padgett, D.; Scott, G.; Cross, A.; Mirfenderesky, M.; Greenaway, J.; Cole, K.; Clarke, P.; Duckworth, N.; Walsh, S.; Bicknell, K.; Impey, R.; Wyllie, S.; Hopes, R.; Bishop, C.; Chalker, V.; et al..
Embase;
Preprint in English | EMBASE | ID: ppcovidwho-326827

ABSTRACT

The Delta variant of concern of SARS-CoV-2 has spread globally causing large outbreaks and resurgences of COVID-19 cases1-3. The emergence of Delta in the UK occurred on the background of a heterogeneous landscape of immunity and relaxation of non-pharmaceutical interventions4,5. Here we analyse 52,992 Delta genomes from England in combination with 93,649 global genomes to reconstruct the emergence of Delta, and quantify its introduction to and regional dissemination across England, in the context of changing travel and social restrictions. Through analysis of human movement, contact tracing, and virus genomic data, we find that the focus of geographic expansion of Delta shifted from India to a more global pattern in early May 2021. In England, Delta lineages were introduced >1,000 times and spread nationally as non-pharmaceutical interventions were relaxed. We find that hotel quarantine for travellers from India reduced onward transmission from importations;however the transmission chains that later dominated the Delta wave in England had been already seeded before restrictions were introduced. In England, increasing inter-regional travel drove Delta's nationwide dissemination, with some cities receiving >2,000 observable lineage introductions from other regions. Subsequently, increased levels of local population mixing, not the number of importations, was associated with faster relative growth of Delta. Among US states, we find that regions that previously experienced large waves also had faster Delta growth rates, and a model including interactions between immunity and human behaviour could accurately predict the rise of Delta there. Delta's invasion dynamics depended on fine scale spatial heterogeneity in immunity and contact patterns and our findings will inform optimal spatial interventions to reduce transmission of current and future VOCs such as Omicron.

14.
Robson, S. C.; Connor, T. R.; Loman, N. J.; Golubchik, T.; Nunez, R. T. M.; Bonsall, D.; Rambaut, A.; Snell, L. B.; Livett, R.; Ludden, C.; Corden, S.; Nastouli, E.; Nebbia, G.; Johnston, I.; Lythgoe, K.; Torok, M. E.; Goodfellow, I. G.; Prieto, J. A.; Saeed, K.; Jackson, D. K.; Houlihan, C.; Frampton, D.; Hamilton, W. L.; Witney, A. A.; Bucca, G.; Pope, C. F.; Moore, C.; Thomson, E. C.; Harrison, E. M.; Smith, C. P.; Rogan, F.; Beckwith, S. M.; Murray, A.; Singleton, D.; Eastick, K.; Sheridan, L. A.; Randell, P.; Jackson, L. M.; Ariani, C. V.; Gonçalves, S.; Fairley, D. J.; Loose, M. W.; Watkins, J.; Moses, S.; Nicholls, S.; Bull, M.; Amato, R.; Smith, D. L.; Aanensen, D. M.; Barrett, J. C.; Aggarwal, D.; Shepherd, J. G.; Curran, M. D.; Parmar, S.; Parker, M. D.; Williams, C.; Glaysher, S.; Underwood, A. P.; Bashton, M.; Loveson, K. F.; Byott, M.; Pacchiarini, N.; Carabelli, A. M.; Templeton, K. E.; de Silva, T. I.; Wang, D.; Langford, C. F.; Sillitoe, J.; Gunson, R. N.; Cottrell, S.; O'Grady, J.; Kwiatkowski, D.; Lillie, P. J.; Cortes, N.; Moore, N.; Thomas, C.; Burns, P. J.; Mahungu, T. W.; Liggett, S.; Beckett, A. H.; Holden, M. T. G.; Levett, L. J.; Osman, H.; Hassan-Ibrahim, M. O.; Simpson, D. A.; Chand, M.; Gupta, R. K.; Darby, A. C.; Paterson, S.; Pybus, O. G.; Volz, E. M.; de Angelis, D.; Robertson, D. L.; Page, A. J.; Martincorena, I.; Aigrain, L.; Bassett, A. R.; Wong, N.; Taha, Y.; Erkiert, M. J.; Chapman, M. H. S.; Dewar, R.; McHugh, M. P.; Mookerjee, S.; Aplin, S.; Harvey, M.; Sass, T.; Umpleby, H.; Wheeler, H.; McKenna, J. P.; Warne, B.; Taylor, J. F.; Chaudhry, Y.; Izuagbe, R.; Jahun, A. S.; Young, G. R.; McMurray, C.; McCann, C. M.; Nelson, A.; Elliott, S.; Lowe, H.; Price, A.; Crown, M. R.; Rey, S.; Roy, S.; Temperton, B.; Shaaban, S.; Hesketh, A. R.; Laing, K. G.; Monahan, I. M.; Heaney, J.; Pelosi, E.; Silviera, S.; Wilson-Davies, E.; Adams, H.; du Plessis, L.; Johnson, R.; Harvey, W. T.; Hughes, J.; Orton, R. J.; Spurgin, L. G.; Bourgeois, Y.; Ruis, C.; O'Toole, Á, Gourtovaia, M.; Sanderson, T.; Fraser, C.; Edgeworth, J.; Breuer, J.; Michell, S. L.; Todd, J. A.; John, M.; Buck, D.; Gajee, K.; Kay, G. L.; Peacock, S. J.; Heyburn, D.; Kitchman, K.; McNally, A.; Pritchard, D. T.; Dervisevic, S.; Muir, P.; Robinson, E.; Vipond, B. B.; Ramadan, N. A.; Jeanes, C.; Weldon, D.; Catalan, J.; Jones, N.; da Silva Filipe, A.; Williams, C.; Fuchs, M.; Miskelly, J.; Jeffries, A. R.; Oliver, K.; Park, N. R.; Ash, A.; Koshy, C.; Barrow, M.; Buchan, S. L.; Mantzouratou, A.; Clark, G.; Holmes, C. W.; Campbell, S.; Davis, T.; Tan, N. K.; Brown, J. R.; Harris, K. A.; Kidd, S. P.; Grant, P. R.; Xu-McCrae, L.; Cox, A.; Madona, P.; Pond, M.; Randell, P. A.; Withell, K. T.; Williams, C.; Graham, C.; Denton-Smith, R.; Swindells, E.; Turnbull, R.; Sloan, T. J.; Bosworth, A.; Hutchings, S.; Pymont, H. M.; Casey, A.; Ratcliffe, L.; Jones, C. R.; Knight, B. A.; Haque, T.; Hart, J.; Irish-Tavares, D.; Witele, E.; Mower, C.; Watson, L. K.; Collins, J.; Eltringham, G.; Crudgington, D.; Macklin, B.; Iturriza-Gomara, M.; Lucaci, A. O.; McClure, P. C.; Carlile, M.; Holmes, N.; Moore, C.; Storey, N.; Rooke, S.; Yebra, G.; Craine, N.; Perry, M.; Fearn, N. C.; Goudarzi, S.; Lyons, R. A.; Williams, T.; Haldenby, S. T.; Durham, J.; Leonard, S.; Davies, R. M.; Batra, R.; Blane, B.; Spyer, M. J.; Smith, P.; Yavus, M.; Williams, R. J.; Mahanama, A. I. K.; Samaraweera, B.; Girgis, S. T.; Hansford, S. E.; Green, A.; Beaver, C.; Bellis, K. L.; Dorman, M. J.; Kay, S.; Prestwood, L.; Rajatileka, S.; Quick, J.; Poplawski, R.; Reynolds, N.; Mack, A.; Morriss, A.; Whalley, T.; Patel, B.; Georgana, I.; Hosmillo, M.; Pinckert, M. L.; Stockton, J.; Henderson, J. H.; Hollis, A.; Stanley, W.; Yew, W. C.; Myers, R.; Thornton, A.; Adams, A.; Annett, T.; Asad, H.; Birchley, A.; Coombes, J.; Evans, J. 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Embase;
Preprint in English | EMBASE | ID: ppcovidwho-326811

ABSTRACT

The scale of data produced during the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic has been unprecedented, with more than 5 million sequences shared publicly at the time of writing. This wealth of sequence data provides important context for interpreting local outbreaks. However, placing sequences of interest into national and international context is difficult given the size of the global dataset. Often outbreak investigations and genomic surveillance efforts require running similar analyses again and again on the latest dataset and producing reports. We developed civet (cluster investigation and virus epidemiology tool) to aid these routine analyses and facilitate virus outbreak investigation and surveillance. Civet can place sequences of interest in the local context of background diversity, resolving the query into different 'catchments' and presenting the phylogenetic results alongside metadata in an interactive, distributable report. Civet can be used on a fine scale for clinical outbreak investigation, for local surveillance and cluster discovery, and to routinely summarise the virus diversity circulating on a national level. Civet reports have helped researchers and public health bodies feedback genomic information in the appropriate context within a timeframe that is useful for public health.

15.
Safety and Health at Work ; 13:S207, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1677131

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The COVID-19 epidemic left high proportion of healthcare workers (HCWs) faced with considerable levels of anxiety, depression, and insomnia. Previous studies have shown excessive workload and inadequate working conditions are two main issues among HCWs. Assessing QoWL has been considered as an important way of understanding how HCWs evaluate their work environment. Material and Methods: A cross section survey among frontline HCWs from China and UK (n = 345) was undertaken based on seven dimensional QoWL factors : General Well-Being (GWB);Home-Work Interface (HWI);Job & Career Satisfaction (JCS);Control at Work (CAW), Working Conditions (WCS);Stress at Work (SAW);employee engagement (EEN). Cronbach α was used to measure the internal consistency within each domain and to test the exploratory factor structure confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was applied. Descriptive analysis and One-way ANOVA was performed to examine the association between demographic and job characteristics with QoWL. Ethics clearance was granted by faculty ethics committee. Results: Acceptable Cronbach α score, and CFA were achieved. Overall, 72.8% of the HCWs confirmed working under pressure during the pandemic and 54.2% felt excessive level of stress associated with workload. Significant differences were found between gender and three dimensions, i.e. EEN (F = 6.51, p = 0.011), GWB (F = 3.91, p =0.049), HWI (F = 5.22, p = 0.023). Conclusions: The study conclude organisations and related stakeholders should invest in workplace programmes aimed at alleviating stress at work and excessive workload issue among frontline HCWs.

16.
Irish Journal of Medical Science ; 190(SUPPL 5):196-197, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1576117
17.
Ann R Coll Surg Engl ; 104(7): e197-e201, 2022 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1542158

ABSTRACT

Perioperative oncological therapies resulting in pathological complete response (pCR) in diffuse-type distal gastric adenocarcinoma are extremely rare. We report a case of locally advanced (cT3 N2 M0) diffuse-type distal gastric adenocarcinoma treated with 'total neoadjuvant' FLOT (eight cycles), due to the COVID-19 pandemic, and laparoscopic radical subtotal gastrectomy with D2 lymphadenectomy. The patient demonstrated a progressive radiological response on positron emission tomography with 2-deoxy-2-[fluorine-18]fluoro-d-glucose integrated with computed tomography (18F-FDG PET-CT) and pCR in the resected specimen (ypT0 N0). As far as we are aware, this is the first case of pCR in locally advanced T3 N2 diffuse distal gastric cancer to be reported in the literature. It introduces a novel approach of total neoadjuvant chemotherapy with 18F-FDG PET-CT to assess response, combined with radical minimally invasive surgical management to provide optimal care for patients with gastric cancer.


Subject(s)
Adenocarcinoma , COVID-19 , Stomach Neoplasms , Adenocarcinoma/diagnostic imaging , Adenocarcinoma/drug therapy , Adenocarcinoma/surgery , Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/therapeutic use , Fluorodeoxyglucose F18/therapeutic use , Gastrectomy/methods , Humans , Neoadjuvant Therapy , Pandemics , Positron Emission Tomography Computed Tomography , Stomach Neoplasms/drug therapy , Stomach Neoplasms/pathology , Stomach Neoplasms/surgery
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