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1.
Microbiol Spectr ; 9(1): e0027321, 2021 09 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1341310

ABSTRACT

The SARS-CoV-2 B.1.1.7 variant has increased sharply in numbers worldwide and is reported to be more contagious than the nonvariant. Little is known regarding the detailed clinical features of B.1.1.7 variant infection. Data on 74 COVID-19 cases from two outbreaks in two districts of Beijing, China were extracted from a cloud database, including 41 cases from Shunyi District (Shunyi B.1.470 group) and 33 from Daxing (Daxing B.1.1.7 group) from December 25, 2020 to January 17, 2021. We conducted a comparison of the clinical characteristics. Seven clinical indicators of the Daxing B.1.1.7 group were significantly higher than those of the Shunyi group, including the proportion with fever over 38°C, the levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), serum amyloid A (SAA), creatine kinase (CK), d-dimer (DD), and CD4+ T lymphocytes (CD4+ T), and the proportion with ground-glass opacity (GGO) in the lung (P values of ≤0.05). After adjusting for age, B.1.1.7 variant infection was a risk factor for elevated CRP (P = 0·045), SAA (P = 0·011), CK (P = 0·034), and CD4+ T (P = 0.029) and for the presence of GGO (P = 0.005). The median threshold cycle (CT) value of reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) tests of the N gene target in the Daxing B.1.1.7 group was significantly lower (P = 0.036) than that in the Shunyi B.1.470 group. Clinical features, including a more serious inflammatory response, pneumonia, and a possibly higher viral load, were detected in the cases infected with B.1.1.7 SARS-CoV-2. The B.1.1.7 variant may have increased pathogenicity. IMPORTANCE The SARS-CoV-2 B.1.1.7 variant, which was first identified in the United Kingdom, has increased sharply in numbers worldwide and was reported to be more contagious than the nonvariant. To our knowledge, no studies investigating the detailed clinical features of COVID-19 cases infected with the B.1.1.7 variant have been published. Local epidemics have rarely occurred in China, but occasionally, a small clustered outbreak triggered by an imported SARS-CoV-2 strain with only one chain of transmission could happen. From late 2020 to early 2021, two clustered COVID-19 outbreaks occurred in Beijing, one of which was caused by the B.1.1.7 variant. The COVID-19 patients from the two outbreaks received similar clinical tests, diagnoses, and treatments. We found that the B.1.1.7 variant infection could lead to a more serious inflammatory response, acute response process, more severe pneumonia, and probably higher viral loads. This therefore implies that the B.1.1.7 variant may have increased pathogenicity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Disease Outbreaks , SARS-CoV-2/classification , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Adult , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes , China/epidemiology , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Lung/virology , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , Risk Factors , Viral Load , Whole Genome Sequencing
2.
SciFinder; 2020.
Preprint | SciFinder | ID: ppcovidwho-4485

ABSTRACT

A review. Novel coronavirus pneumonia is prevalent and spreading in Wuhan and it has the characteristics of high infectivity and high mortality in severe patients. Some severe cases are in danger of death because of respiratory and circulatory failure. In the absence of effective drugs for novel coronavirus pneumonia, respiratory and circulatory functions can be supported simultaneously by ECMO, which can gain time for the treatment of severe patients. This article will discuss the application value of ECMO in severe cases of novel coronavirus pneumonia.

3.
SciFinder; 2020.
Preprint | SciFinder | ID: ppcovidwho-4060

ABSTRACT

A review. 2019-nCoV is a kind of novel coronavirus isolated and identified from patients with pneumonia of unknown cause in Dec.2019 in Wuhan, China. According to the current data of patients with pneumonia of 2019-nCoV and the newly published relevant articles, we noticed that, besides the typical respiratory manifestations, some patients infected with 2019-nCoV presented cardiovascular manifestations. This article reviewed the main cardiac manifestations and put forward the treatment strategies regarding these cardiac symptoms.

4.
Open Forum Infect Dis ; 7(10): ofaa379, 2020 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-952938

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Few studies have compared the yield of reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assays in nasopharyngeal swabs, oropharyngeal swabs, and sputum for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) detection. METHODS: We conducted an observational study in Beijing Ditan Hospital, China. Specimens including nasopharyngeal swabs, oropharyngeal swabs, and sputum from confirmed coronavirus 2019 patients were collected for RT-PCR testing. Disease duration was calculated from the date of symptom onset to the date of specimen collection and divided into 3 groups: ≤14 days, 14-21 days, and >21 days. We compared positive rates across the 3 specimens collected. The kappa coefficient was used to evaluate the consistency of RT-PCR results between different specimens. RESULTS: A total of 291 specimens were collected and tested from 43 confirmed patients. Among specimens collected with a disease duration of ≤14 days, the positive rate was highest in sputum (79.2%); this rate was significantly higher than that in nasopharyngeal swabs (37.5%; P = .003) and oropharyngeal swabs (20.8%; P < .001). Similar findings were observed with the disease durations of 14-21 days and >21 days. The consistency of testing results between nasopharyngeal swabs and oropharyngeal swabs was low with the disease durations of ≤14 days and >21 days. The consistency between the sputum and oropharyngeal swabs and between the sputum and nasopharyngeal swabs was very low across all 3 disease durations, with statistical significance. CONCLUSIONS: Compared with nasopharyngeal swabs and oropharyngeal swabs, sputum had the highest yield of SARS-CoV-2 detection. Nasopharyngeal swabs and oropharyngeal swabs had a similar yield. If sputum is not feasible, a nasopharyngeal swab can be recommended for the detection of SARS-CoV-2, and early testing is needed.

5.
Biomed Environ Sci ; 33(8): 614-619, 2020 Aug 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-771380

ABSTRACT

This study aimed to understand the differences in clinical, epidemiological, and laboratory features between the new coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-2019) and influenza A in children. Data of 23 hospitalized children with COVID-19 (9 boys, 5.7 ± 3.8 years old) were compared with age- and sex-matched 69 hospitalized and 69 outpatient children with influenza A from a hospital in China. The participants' epidemiological history, family cluster, clinical manifestations, and blood test results were assessed. Compared with either inpatients or outpatients with influenza A, children with COVID-19 showed significantly more frequent family infections and higher ratio of low fever (< 37.3 °C), but shorter cough and fever duration, lower body temperature, and lower rates of cough, fever, high fever (> 39 °C), nasal congestion, rhinorrhea, sore throat, vomiting, myalgia or arthralgia, and febrile seizures. They also showed higher counts of lymphocytes, T lymphocyte CD8, and platelets and levels of cholinesterase, aspartate aminotransferase, lactate dehydrogenase, and lactic acid, but lower serum amyloid, C-reactive protein, and fibrinogen levels and erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and shorter prothrombin time. The level of alanine aminotransferase in children with COVID-19 is lower than that in inpatients but higher than that in outpatients with influenza A. Pediatric COVID-19 is associated with more frequent family infection, milder symptoms, and milder immune responses relative to pediatric influenza A.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/physiology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Influenza, Human/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , COVID-19 , Case-Control Studies , Child , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Female , Humans , Influenza, Human/blood , Influenza, Human/immunology , Male , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , SARS-CoV-2
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