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1.
Journal of Knowledge Management ; : 12, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1868496

ABSTRACT

Purpose This paper aims to unveil the importance of knowledge management on a firm's strategic emergency response during the great negative shock from global public health threats. Through analyzing how representative firms in China's new economy industries dealt with the COVID-19 pandemic before, during and after the crisis, the significant problems confronted by these firms are pointed out, and the important role knowledge management capabilities played in solving these problems is proven. Design/methodology/approach The open data of listed companies regarding the important role knowledge management played in firms' strategic emergency response during the COVID-19 pandemic are qualitatively analyzed. Based on theoretical sampling, this paper selects representative samples of enterprises and analyzes the positive response measures they took after being hit by this public health event to gain qualitative insight into the importance of knowledge management capabilities in strategic emergency response. Findings Three aspects of the important role of knowledge management capabilities in a firm's strategic emergency response during the COVID-19 pandemic are introduced: before the crisis, firms should strengthen the acquisition, sharing and integration of knowledge so that they can intensify their monitoring for uncertain risks;during the crisis, firms should boost the transmission, transformation and diffusion of knowledge to improve emergency cooperation;and after the crisis, companies should reinforce knowledge evaluation, creation and application to enhance "immunity" in similar emergencies. Research limitations/implications This paper has important implications for bolstering strategic emergency management practice and knowledge management capability among firms. Future research must focus on the following two aspects for further investigation: the dynamic relationship between firm knowledge management capability and strategic emergency response ability;and the collaboration system between firm knowledge management and strategic emergency response behaviors. Originality/value This paper discusses the important role knowledge management capabilities play in firms' strategic emergency responses based on insights gained from the significant changes that the COVID-19 pandemic caused to representative Chinese new economy firms. By analyzing the three stages of before, during and after the emergency, this paper proposes the exact efforts that new economy companies should make in improving knowledge management capability.

2.
Journal of the Association for Consumer Research ; 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1549095

ABSTRACT

News outlets often depict the coronavirus as a “burglar” or a “killer”—even though viruses are not technically alive. While imbuing this virus with human-like qualities may enable the public to feel as if they are better able to understand it, does anthropomorphizing the coronavirus lead people to adopt protective behaviors against the spread of the disease? Integrating construal level theory, we argue that anthropomorphizing an agent makes it seem more understandable, which decreases its psychological distance. And through construal matching between the message and con-sumers’ temporal focus, we demonstrate that when the coronavirus is anthropomorphized, people are more likely to adopt protective measures when they are focused on the present versus the future because consumers believe the anthropomorphized coronavirus to be more powerful. Our findings contribute to both anthropomorphism and construal level theory research. Additionally, our findings offer implications for health communication strategies and public policy. © 2021 Association for Consumer Research. All rights reserved.

4.
BJS Open ; 5(SUPPL 1):i22, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1493719

ABSTRACT

Introduction: In response to the disruption to medical education caused by COVID-19, there is a need for wide-scale robust medical education research and the generation of research capacity for the future. Trainee research collaboratives have demonstrated they can nurture the research skills of students and trainees while delivering high quality research outputs. However, we have been unable to identify a permanent medical education research collaborative for trainees and students. Methods: We started the MedEd Collaborative in September 2020 to fill this gap, consisting of a trainee-and student-led medical education research collaborative supported by senior medical education experts and clinicians. Results: Our vision is to increase engagement of students and trainees in high-quality medical education research that informs practice. The MedEd Collaborative will engage students and trainees in medical education research by completing at least one national multicentre study per year, the first being the COVID Ready 2 study. This is a national cross-sectional survey of the educational impact of medical student volunteering during the COVID-19 pandemic. Conclusions: We anticipate the MedEd collaborative will: increase exposure to medical education research, thereby increasing the number of medical students and trainees aiming to pursue an academic medical education career;provide training in medical education research methodologies, such as qualitative analysis;improve the quality of medical education research outputs from students and trainees;encourage collaboration between medical schools and deaneries;and provide support to other trainee research collaboratives that aim to explore education research in their own specialties.

5.
BJS Open ; 5(SUPPL 1):i11, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1493706

ABSTRACT

Introduction: COVID-19 led to global disruption of healthcare and many students volunteered to provide clinical support. Volunteering to work was a unique medical education opportunity;however, it is unknown whether this was a positive learning experience. Methods: The COVID Ready 2 study is a national cross-sectional study of all medical students at UK medical schools. We will compare opinions of those who did and did not volunteer to determine the educational benefit and issues they faced. We will use thematic analysis to identify themes in qualitative responses, in addition to quantitative analysis. Results: The primary objective is to explore the effect of volunteering during the pandemic on medical education in comparison to those who did not volunteer. Our secondary objectives are to identify: whether students would be willing to assume similar roles in a non-pandemic setting;if students found the experience more or less beneficial than traditional hospital placements and reasons for this;what the perceived benefits and disadvantages of volunteering were;the difference in perceived preparedness between students who did and did not volunteer for foundation training year one and the next academic year;training received by volunteers;and to explore issues associated with volunteering, including safety issues and issues with role and competence. Conclusions: We anticipate this study will help identify volunteer structures that have been beneficial for students, so that similar infrastructures can be used in the future;and help determine whether formal voluntary roles should be introduced into the non-pandemic medical curriculum.

7.
British Journal of Surgery ; 108(SUPPL 2):ii54, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1254548

ABSTRACT

Introduction: We aimed to identify motivators and barriers to volunteering during a disaster and knowledge and medical school curriculum of disaster and pandemic medicine. Method: We systematically searched the literature on 28/6/2020, following PRISMA guidelines. Results: A total of 37 studies met inclusion criteria including 11,168 medical students and 91 medical schools. 24 studies evaluated knowledge (64.9%), 16 evaluated volunteering (43.2%), and five evaluated medical school curricula (13.5%). Weighted mean willingness to volunteer during a disaster was 68.4% (SD=21.7%, n=2911), and there was a significant difference between those planning to volunteer and those who actually volunteered (P<.001). We identified a number of modifiable barriers which may contribute to this difference. Overall, knowledge of disasters was poor with a weighted mean of 48.9% (SD=15.1%, n=2985). Conclusions: There is a large number of students who are willing to volunteer during pandemics. However, they are likely to be under-prepared for these roles due to poor overall knowledge and limited teaching. During the current COVID-19 pandemic and in future disasters, medical students may be required to volunteer as auxiliary staff. Medical schools need to develop infrastructure to facilitate this process. as well as providing education and training to ensure students are adequately prepared for these roles.

8.
Yaoxue Xuebao ; 55(11):2529-2534, 2020.
Article in Chinese | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1158862

ABSTRACT

Coronaviruses (CoVs) are associated with some mammalian infectious diseases, which have caused several outbreaks of respiratory system infectious diseases in recent years. There is no effective vaccine or approved drug treatment against coronaviruses, and the development of anti-coronavirus agents is an urgent priority. Pheno-thiazines are a class of antipsychotic drugs, which were found that they have some other biological activities, like promising antibacterial, antifungal, anticancer, antiviral, etc. They can be used for drug repurposing. This review summarizes current researches on the potential anti-coronavirus activity of phenothiazine, discusses the mechanisms and some research difficulties, and provides a foundation for developing anti-coronavirus drugs which use phenothiazine as the lead compound.

9.
Remote Sensing Letters ; 11(12):1118-1126, 2020.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-970116

ABSTRACT

The lockdowns imposed worldwide to curb the coronavirus diseases (COVID-19) spread has positive effects on the environment. However, it is unclear what fraction is caused by weather and what is related to lockdown. Here we used Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) height anomaly time series to quantify the spatio-temporal characteristics of lockdown-induced noise anomalies at 231 selected sites over mainland China. The results indicated that apparent declines (0.52 mm) in noise in 6 days (24–29 January 2020) after the lockdown in Wuhan resulted in drastically reduced human activities, which accounts for 71% of the total noise decrease. The lockdown effects persisted for 8 weeks and reached the maximum in the third week (6–12 February 2020) with reduced GNSS noise anomalies occurring at 81% of the GNSS sites. With the control of pandemic, increased noise anomalies occurred at more than 60% of the sites during the 9th week, which correlated well with the easing of lockdown in many cities in China. We concluded that this study provides new insights to quantifying the effects of human activities on geodetic measurements during the COVID-19 lockdown. © 2020 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

10.
QJM ; 113(12): 876-882, 2020 Dec 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-713715

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Cardiovascular disease (CVD) was in common in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients and associated with unfavorable outcomes. We aimed to compare the clinical observations and outcomes of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2)-infected patients with or without CVD. METHODS: Patients with laboratory-confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection were clinically evaluated at Wuhan Seventh People's Hospital, Wuhan, China, from 23 January to 14 March 2020. Demographic data, laboratory findings, comorbidities, treatments and outcomes were collected and analyzed in COVID-19 patients with and without CVD. RESULTS: Among 596 patients with COVID-19, 215 (36.1%) of them with CVD. Compared with patients without CVD, these patients were significantly older (66 vs. 52 years) and had higher proportion of men (52.5% vs. 43.8%). Complications in the course of disease were more common in patients with CVD, included acute respiratory distress syndrome (22.8% vs. 8.1%), malignant arrhythmias (3.7% vs. 1.0%) including ventricular tachycardia/ventricular fibrillation, acute coagulopathy(7.9% vs. 1.8%) and acute kidney injury (11.6% vs. 3.4%). The rate of glucocorticoid therapy (36.7% vs. 25.5%), Vitamin C (23.3% vs. 11.8%), mechanical ventilation (21.9% vs. 7.6%), intensive care unit admission (12.6% vs. 3.7%) and mortality (16.7% vs. 4.7%) were higher in patients with CVD (both P < 0.05). The multivariable Cox regression models showed that older age (≥65 years old) (HR 3.165, 95% CI 1.722-5.817) and patients with CVD (HR 2.166, 95% CI 1.189-3.948) were independent risk factors for death. CONCLUSIONS: CVD are independent risk factors for COVID-19 patients. COVID-19 patients with CVD were more severe and had higher mortality rate, early intervention and vigilance should be taken.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , Cardiovascular Diseases/complications , Cardiovascular Diseases/mortality , Adult , Aged , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/therapy , Cardiovascular Diseases/therapy , Cause of Death , China/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
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