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1.
EBioMedicine ; 75: 103789, 2021 Dec 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1587925

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The long-term consequences of human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cell (UC-MSC) treatment for COVID-19 patients are yet to be reported. This study assessed the 1-year outcomes in patients with severe COVID-19, who were recruited in our previous UC-MSC clinical trial. METHODS: In this prospective, longitudinal, cohort study, 100 patients enrolled in our phase 2 trial were prospectively followed up at 3-month intervals for 1 year to evaluate the long-term safety and effectiveness of UC-MSC treatment. The primary endpoint was an altered proportion of whole-lung lesion volumes measured by high-resolution CT. Other imaging outcomes, 6 min walking distance (6-MWD), lung function, plasma biomarkers, and adverse events were also recorded and analyzed. This trial was registered with ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT04288102). FINDINGS: MSC administration improved in whole-lung lesion volume compared with the placebo with a difference of -10.8% (95% CI: -20.7%, -1.5%, p = 0.030) on day 10. MSC also reduced the proportion of solid component lesion volume compared with the placebo at each follow-up point. More interestingly, 17.9% (10/56) of patients in the MSC group had normal CT images at month 12, but none in the placebo group (p = 0.013). The incidence of symptoms was lower in the MSC group than in the placebo group at each follow-up time. Neutralizing antibodies were all positive, with a similar median inhibition rate (61.6% vs. 67.6%) in both groups at month 12. No difference in adverse events at the 1-year follow-up and tumor markers at month 12 were observed between the two groups. INTERPRETATION: UC-MSC administration achieves a long-term benefit in the recovery of lung lesions and symptoms in COVID-19 patients. FUNDING: The National Key R&D Program of China, the Innovation Groups of the National Natural Science Foundation of China, and the National Science and Technology Major Project.

2.
BMC Infect Dis ; 21(1): 818, 2021 Aug 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1477280

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Liver injuries have been reported in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). This study aimed to investigate the clinical role played by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). METHODS: In this multicentre, retrospective study, the parameters of liver function tests in COVID-19 inpatients were compared between various time-points in reference to SARS-CoV-2 shedding, and 3 to 7 days before the first detection of viral shedding was regarded as the reference baseline. RESULTS: In total, 70 COVID-19 inpatients were enrolled. Twenty-two (31.4%) patients had a self-medication history after illness. At baseline, 10 (14.3%), 7 (10%), 9 (12.9%), 2 (2.9%), 15 (21.4%), and 4 (5.7%) patients already had abnormal alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), albumin, and total bilirubin (TBIL) values, respectively. ALT and AST abnormal rates and levels did not show any significant dynamic changes during the full period of viral shedding (all p > 0.05). The GGT abnormal rate (p = 0.008) and level (p = 0.033) significantly increased on day 10 of viral shedding. Meanwhile, no simultaneous significant increases in abnormal ALP rates and levels were observed. TBIL abnormal rates and levels significantly increased on days 1 and 5 of viral shedding (all p < 0.05). Albumin abnormal decrease rates increased, and levels decreased consistently from baseline to SARS-CoV-2 clearance day (all p < 0.05). Thirteen (18.6%) patients had chronic liver disease, two of whom died. The ALT and AST abnormal rates and levels did not increase in patients with chronic liver disease during SARS-CoV-2 shedding. CONCLUSIONS: SARS-CoV-2 does not directly lead to elevations in ALT and AST but may result in elevations in GGT and TBIL; albumin decreased extraordinarily even when SARS-CoV-2 shedding ended.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Liver/virology , Adult , Aged , Alanine Transaminase/blood , Aspartate Aminotransferases/blood , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Liver/pathology , Liver Function Tests/methods , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index
3.
Signal Transduct Target Ther ; 6(1): 339, 2021 09 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1402052

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), has placed a global public burden on health authorities. Although the virological characteristics and pathogenesis of COVID-19 has been largely clarified, there is currently no specific therapeutic measure. In severe cases, acute SARS-CoV-2 infection leads to immune disorders and damage to both the adaptive and innate immune responses. Having roles in immune regulation and regeneration, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) serving as a therapeutic option may regulate the over-activated inflammatory response and promote recovery of lung damage. Since the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic, a series of MSC-therapy clinical trials has been conducted. The findings indicate that MSC treatment not only significantly reduces lung damage, but also improves patient recovery with safety and good immune tolerance. Herein, we summarize the recent progress in MSC therapy for COVID-19 and highlight the challenges in the field.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Lung Injury/therapy , Lung/immunology , Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Animals , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/pathology , Humans , Lung/pathology , Lung/virology , Lung Injury/immunology , Lung Injury/virology , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/pathology
4.
Front Immunol ; 12: 700152, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1359189

ABSTRACT

Background: Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells are considered to participate of the host immune response against acute severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection; however, single-cell transcriptomic profiling of MAIT cells in patients with COVID-19 remains unexplored. Methods: We performed single-cell RNA sequencing analyses on peripheral MAIT cells from 13 patients with COVID-19 and 5 healthy donors. The transcriptional profiles of MAIT cells, together with assembled T-cell receptor sequences, were analyzed. Flow cytometry analysis was also performed to investigate the properties of MAIT cells. Results: We identified that differentially expressed genes (DEGs) of MAIT cells were involved in myeloid leukocyte activation and lymphocyte activation in patients with COVID-19. In addition, in MAIT cells from severe cases, more DEGs were enriched in adaptive cellular and humoral immune responses compared with those in moderate cases. Further analysis indicated that the increase of cell cytotoxicity (killing), chemotaxis, and apoptosis levels in MAIT cells were consistent with disease severity and displayed the highest levels in patients with severe disease. Interestingly, flow cytometry analysis showed that the frequencies of pyroptotic MAIT cells, but not the frequencies of apoptotic MAIT cells, were increased significantly in patients with COVID-19, suggesting pyroptosis is one of leading causes of MAIT cell deaths during SARS-CoV-2 infection. Importantly, there were more clonal expansions of MAIT cells in severe cases than in moderate cases. Conclusions: The results of the present study suggest that MAIT cells are likely to be involved in the host immune response against SARS-CoV-2 infection. Simultaneously, the transcriptomic data from MAIT cells provides a deeper understanding of the immune pathogenesis of the disease.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Mucosal-Associated Invariant T Cells/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Transcriptome/genetics , Base Sequence , COVID-19/pathology , Gene Expression Profiling , Gene Expression Regulation/genetics , Gene Expression Regulation/immunology , Humans , Lymphocyte Activation/genetics , Pyroptosis/physiology , Sequence Analysis, RNA , Severity of Illness Index , VDJ Exons/genetics
5.
Front Med (Lausanne) ; 8: 604242, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1332123

ABSTRACT

Objectives: Our objective was to explore the incidence and early predictive factors of acute kidney injury in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients. Method: We established a retrospective cohort of 408 patients who were admitted to Shenzhen Third People's Hospital in Shenzhen, China, between January 1 and March 31, 2020. Clinical outcomes and renal function were monitored until April 12, 2020, with a median follow-up duration of 21 days [interquartile range (IQR) = 14-33]. Results: When first admitted to hospital (baseline), 19.36% (79/408) presented renal dysfunction [estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) <90 ml/min/1.73 m2]. During follow-up, 3.9% (16/408) developed acute kidney injury (AKI). Age ≥60 years [hazard ratio (HR) = 4.78, 95% CI = 1.10-20.69], PaO2/FiO2 ratio <300 (HR = 3.48, 95% CI = 1.04-11.62), and higher creatinine (HR = 1.04, 95% CI = 1.01-1.07) at baseline independently predicted the risk of AKI. Respectively, 25.0% (102/408), 3.9% (16/408), 0.5% (2/408), 1.0% (4/408), and 0.2% (1/408) experienced G2, G3a, G3b, G4, and G5 as their most severe category during hospitalization, while 69.4% (283/408) had normal eGFRs throughout the follow-up period. When finally discharged from hospital, there were 12.5% (51/408) of patients with abnormal eGFRs. Conclusions: COVID-19 patients can be at risk of AKI and continuous eGFR decline during hospitalization, which can be early predicted by baseline factors. Some individuals still had renal dysfunction when finally discharged from hospital.

7.
Nat Metab ; 3(7): 909-922, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1279905

ABSTRACT

Exosomes represent a subtype of extracellular vesicle that is released through retrograde transport and fusion of multivesicular bodies with the plasma membrane1. Although no perfect methodologies currently exist for the high-throughput, unbiased isolation of pure plasma exosomes2,3, investigation of exosome-enriched plasma fractions of extracellular vesicles can confer a glimpse into the endocytic pathway on a systems level. Here we conduct high-coverage lipidomics with an emphasis on sterols and oxysterols, and proteomic analyses of exosome-enriched extracellular vesicles (EVs hereafter) from patients at different temporal stages of COVID-19, including the presymptomatic, hyperinflammatory, resolution and convalescent phases. Our study highlights dysregulated raft lipid metabolism that underlies changes in EV lipid membrane anisotropy that alter the exosomal localization of presenilin-1 (PS-1) in the hyperinflammatory phase. We also show in vitro that EVs from different temporal phases trigger distinct metabolic and transcriptional responses in recipient cells, including in alveolar epithelial cells, which denote the primary site of infection, and liver hepatocytes, which represent a distal secondary site. In comparison to the hyperinflammatory phase, EVs from the resolution phase induce opposing effects on eukaryotic translation and Notch signalling. Our results provide insights into cellular lipid metabolism and inter-tissue crosstalk at different stages of COVID-19 and are a resource to increase our understanding of metabolic dysregulation in COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Extracellular Vesicles/metabolism , Lipidomics , Metabolomics , SARS-CoV-2 , Biological Transport , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cell Fractionation , Cell Membrane/metabolism , Chemical Fractionation , Cluster Analysis , Computational Biology/methods , Exosomes/metabolism , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Lipidomics/methods , Metabolome , Metabolomics/methods , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology
8.
Semin Immunopathol ; 42(3): 279-313, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1202745

ABSTRACT

Modulation of immune responses by nutrients is an important area of study in cellular biology and clinical sciences in the context of cancer therapies and anti-pathogen-directed immune responses in health and disease. We review metabolic pathways that influence immune cell function and cellular persistence in chronic infections. We also highlight the role of nutrients in altering the tissue microenvironment with lessons from the tumor microenvironment that shapes the quality and quantity of cellular immune responses. Multiple layers of biological networks, including the nature of nutritional supplements, the genetic background, previous exposures, and gut microbiota status have impact on cellular performance and immune competence against molecularly defined targets. We discuss how immune metabolism determines the differentiation pathway of antigen-specific immune cells and how these insights can be explored to devise better strategies to strengthen anti-pathogen-directed immune responses, while curbing unwanted, non-productive inflammation.


Subject(s)
Gastrointestinal Microbiome , Tumor Microenvironment , Humans , Immunity, Cellular , Lymphocytes , Metabolic Networks and Pathways
9.
Mil Med Res ; 7(1): 60, 2020 12 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-956635

ABSTRACT

In 2019, an outbreak of Mycoplasma pneumoniae occurred at a military academy in China. The attack rate (10.08%,60/595) was significantly different among the units. High-intensity training and crowded environments to which cadets are exposed are the high risk factors for the outbreak of M. pneumoniae. In-time prevention and control measures effectively controlled the spread of the epidemic.


Subject(s)
Military Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Mycoplasma pneumoniae/pathogenicity , Pneumonia, Mycoplasma/drug therapy , Academies and Institutes/organization & administration , Academies and Institutes/statistics & numerical data , Academies and Institutes/trends , China/epidemiology , Disease Outbreaks/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Mycoplasma pneumoniae/drug effects , Pneumonia, Mycoplasma/epidemiology
10.
Curr Opin Pulm Med ; 27(3): 205-209, 2021 05 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1101916

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2-induced hyperinflammation is a major cause of death or end-organ dysfunction in COVID-19 patients. We review adjunct host-directed therapies (HDTs) for COVID-19 management. RECENT FINDINGS: The use of umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells as HDT for COVID-19 has been shown to be safe in phase 1 and 2 trials. Trials of anti-interleukin-6 receptor antibodies show promising mortality benefit in hospitalized COVID-19 patients. Repurposed drugs and monoclonal antibodies targeting specific cytokines acting on different aspects of the pro- and anti-inflammatory cascades are under evaluation. SUMMARY: A range of HDTs shows promise for reducing mortality and improving long term disability in patients with severe COVID-19, and require evaluation in randomized, controlled trials.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Immunologic Factors/pharmacology , Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation/methods , Molecular Targeted Therapy/methods , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/therapy , Humans , Inflammation/immunology , Inflammation/therapy , SARS-CoV-2
11.
Signal Transduct Target Ther ; 6(1): 58, 2021 02 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1078577

ABSTRACT

Treatment of severe Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) is challenging. We performed a phase 2 trial to assess the efficacy and safety of human umbilical cord-mesenchymal stem cells (UC-MSCs) to treat severe COVID-19 patients with lung damage, based on our phase 1 data. In this randomized, double-blind, and placebo-controlled trial, we recruited 101 severe COVID-19 patients with lung damage. They were randomly assigned at a 2:1 ratio to receive either UC-MSCs (4 × 107 cells per infusion) or placebo on day 0, 3, and 6. The primary endpoint was an altered proportion of whole lung lesion volumes from baseline to day 28. Other imaging outcomes, 6-minute walk test (6-MWT), maximum vital capacity, diffusing capacity, and adverse events were recorded and analyzed. In all, 100 COVID-19 patients were finally received either UC-MSCs (n = 65) or placebo (n = 35). UC-MSCs administration exerted numerical improvement in whole lung lesion volume from baseline to day 28 compared with the placebo (the median difference was -13.31%, 95% CI -29.14%, 2.13%, P = 0.080). UC-MSCs significantly reduced the proportions of solid component lesion volume compared with the placebo (median difference: -15.45%; 95% CI -30.82%, -0.39%; P = 0.043). The 6-MWT showed an increased distance in patients treated with UC-MSCs (difference: 27.00 m; 95% CI 0.00, 57.00; P = 0.057). The incidence of adverse events was similar in the two groups. These results suggest that UC-MSCs treatment is a safe and potentially effective therapeutic approach for COVID-19 patients with lung damage. A phase 3 trial is required to evaluate effects on reducing mortality and preventing long-term pulmonary disability. (Funded by The National Key R&D Program of China and others. ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT04288102.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation , Mesenchymal Stem Cells , SARS-CoV-2 , Umbilical Cord , Aged , Allografts , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/physiopathology , Double-Blind Method , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Treatment Outcome
13.
Infect Dis Poverty ; 9(1): 161, 2020 Nov 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-949105

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is pandemic. It is critical to identify COVID-19 patients who are most likely to develop a severe disease. This study was designed to determine the clinical and epidemiological features of COVID-19 patients associated with the development of pneumonia and factors associated with disease progression. METHODS: Seventy consecutive patients with etiologically confirmed COVID-19 admitted to PLA General Hospital in Beijing, China from December 27, 2019 to March 12, 2020 were enrolled in this study and followed-up to March 16, 2020. Differences in clinical and laboratory findings between COVID-19 patients with pneumonia and those without were determined by the χ2 test or the Fisher exact test (categorical variables) and independent group t test or Mann-Whitney U test (continuous variables). The Cox proportional hazard model and Generalized Estimating Equations were applied to evaluate factors that predicted the progression of COVID-19. RESULTS: The mean incubation was 8.67 (95% confidence interval, 6.78-10.56) days. Mean duration from the first test severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2-positive to conversion was 11.38 (9.86-12.90) days. Compared to pneumonia-free patients, pneumonia patients were 16.5 years older and had higher frequencies of having hypertension, fever, and cough and higher circulating levels of neutrophil proportion, interleukin-6, low count (< 190/µl) of CD8+ T cells, and neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio. Thirteen patients deteriorated during hospitalization. Cox regression analysis indicated that older age and higher serum levels of interleukin-6, C-reactive protein, procalcitonin, and lactate at admission significantly predicted the progression of COVID-19. During hospitalization, circulating counts of T lymphocytes, CD4+ T cells, and CD8+ T cells were lower, whereas neutrophil proportion, neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio, and the circulating levels of interleukin-6, C-reactive protein, and procalcitonin were higher, in pneumonia patients than in pneumonia-free patients. CD8+ lymphocyte count in pneumonia patients did not recover when discharged. CONCLUSIONS: Older age and higher levels of C-reactive protein, procalcitionin, interleukin-6, and lactate might predict COVID-19 progression. T lymphocyte, especially CD8+ cell-mediated immunity is critical in recovery of COVID-19. This study may help in predicting disease progression and designing immunotherapy for COVID-19.


Subject(s)
CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/pathology , COVID-19/pathology , Interleukin-6/blood , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Child, Preschool , China/epidemiology , Disease Progression , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Leukocyte Count , Male , Middle Aged , Neutrophils/pathology , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
14.
J Adv Nurs ; 77(4): 1813-1824, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-938330

ABSTRACT

AIMS: To determine psychological symptoms of patients with mild symptoms of coronavirus disease 2019 in China and to explore the influencing factors. DESIGN: A cross-sectional study. METHODS: A convenience sample of 296 mild coronavirus disease 2019 patients were recruited from a Fangcang hospital in Wuhan, Hubei Province, from 3-5 March, 2020. Participants were assessed using a sociodemographic and clinical characteristics questionnaire, and Symptom Check List 90. The binary logistic regression was utilized to explore the influencing factors of psychological symptoms of patients with mild symptoms of coronavirus disease 2019. RESULTS: In total, 296 of 299 patients with mild symptoms of coronavirus disease 2019 participated in the study (response rate: 99.0%). The findings revealed that 12.8% patients with mild symptoms have mental health problems; the most common psychological symptoms are phobic anxiety (58.4%), paranoid ideation (50.7%) and psychoticism (40.2%). Female patients [OR = 3.587, 95% CI (1.694-7.598)] and those having physical symptoms currently [OR = 2.813, 95% CI (1.210-6.539)] are at higher risk, while those in the middle duration of hospitalization [OR = 0.278, 95% CI (0.121-0.639)] protect against mental-health problems. CONCLUSIONS: The minority of patients with mild symptoms of coronavirus disease 2019 were still suffering from psychological symptoms. Healthcare providers are recommended to pay particular attention to screening these high-risk groups (women, those in the initial stages of hospitalization and those with physical symptoms currently) and implement targeted psychological care as required. IMPACT: This study found that most patients of coronavirus disease 2019 in Fangcang hospital exhibited normal mental health at par with the general Chinese norm and the minority of them were suffering from psychological symptoms. The findings can provide a reference for healthcare providers to screen high-risk psychological symptoms groups and implement targeted psychological intervention for patients with coronavirus disease 2019.


Subject(s)
Anxiety Disorders/etiology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Depressive Disorder/etiology , Symptom Assessment/psychology , Symptom Assessment/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Anxiety Disorders/epidemiology , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depressive Disorder/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prevalence , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
15.
Cell Discov ; 6(1): 77, 2020 Oct 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-894383

ABSTRACT

The novel coronavirus (CoV) severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)-CoV-2 outbreak began at the end of 2019 in Wuhan, China, and has spread to over 200 countries. In this multicenter retrospective study, we identified 2190 adult patients admitted for laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 in three participating centers. Multivariate logistic regression was conducted in patients with comorbid hypertension to examine the potential association between clinical outcomes, disease severity, and clinical characteristics with the use of ACEI, ARB, calcium-channel blockers (CCB), beta-blockers (BB), and thiazide diuretics. The clinical outcome, dyspnea, and fatigue were significantly improved in patients, especially elderly patients who were older than 65 years, who took ARB drugs prior to hospitalization compared to patients who took no drugs. The reduction of disease severity of elderly COVID-19 patients was associated with CCB and ACEI users. Clinical indices, including CRP, lymphocyte count, procalcitonin D dimer, and hemoglobin, were significantly improved in elderly ARB users. In addition, the clinical outcomes were statistically significantly improved in patients who took antihypertension drugs ARB, BB, and CCB after statistical adjustment by all ages, gender, baseline of blood pressures, and coexisting medical conditions. Our data indicate that hypertension drugs ARB, ACEI, CCB, and BB might be beneficial for COVID-19 patients.

17.
Preprint | SSRN | ID: ppcovidwho-705

ABSTRACT

Background: Italy is undergoing an unprecedented COVID-1 epidemic - one of the largest and most lethal outbreaks outside China. The higher death rate observed c

18.
EClinicalMedicine ; 26: 100529, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-773737
19.
Oncoimmunology ; 9(1): 1807836, 2020 08 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-741761

ABSTRACT

Over the past 16 years, three coronaviruses (CoVs), severe acute respiratory syndrome CoV (SARS-CoV) in 2002, Middle East respiratory syndrome CoV (MERS-CoV) in 2012 and 2015, and SARS-CoV-2 in 2020, have been causing severe and fatal human epidemics. The unpredictability of coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) poses a major burden on health care and economic systems across the world. This is caused by the paucity of in-depth knowledge of the risk factors for severe COVID-19, insufficient diagnostic tools for the detection of SARS-CoV-2, as well as the absence of specific and effective drug treatments. While protective humoral and cellular immune responses are usually mounted against these betacoronaviruses, immune responses to SARS-CoV2 sometimes derail towards inflammatory tissue damage, leading to rapid admissions to intensive care units. The lack of knowledge on mechanisms that tilt the balance between these two opposite outcomes poses major threats to many ongoing clinical trials dealing with immunostimulatory or immunoregulatory therapeutics. This review will discuss innate and cognate immune responses underlying protective or deleterious immune reactions against these pathogenic coronaviruses.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Host Microbial Interactions/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Immunity, Cellular , Immunity, Humoral , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/immunology , Protective Factors , Risk Factors , SARS Virus/immunology , Severity of Illness Index
20.
Signal Transduct Target Ther ; 5(1): 172, 2020 08 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-733534

ABSTRACT

No effective drug treatments are available for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Host-directed therapies targeting the underlying aberrant immune responses leading to pulmonary tissue damage, death, or long-term functional disability in survivors require clinical evaluation. We performed a parallel assigned controlled, non-randomized, phase 1 clinical trial to evaluate the safety of human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells (UC-MSCs) infusions in the treatment of patients with moderate and severe COVID-19 pulmonary disease. The study enrolled 18 hospitalized patients with COVID-19 (n = 9 for each group). The treatment group received three cycles of intravenous infusion of UC-MSCs (3 × 107 cells per infusion) on days 0, 3, and 6. Both groups received standard COVID-treatment regimens. Adverse events, duration of clinical symptoms, laboratory parameters, length of hospitalization, serial chest computed tomography (CT) images, the PaO2/FiO2 ratio, dynamics of cytokines, and IgG and IgM anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies were analyzed. No serious UC-MSCs infusion-associated adverse events were observed. Two patients receiving UC-MSCs developed transient facial flushing and fever, and one patient developed transient hypoxia at 12 h post UC-MSCs transfusion. Mechanical ventilation was required in one patient in the treatment group compared with four in the control group. All patients recovered and were discharged. Our data show that intravenous UC-MSCs infusion in patients with moderate and severe COVID-19 is safe and well tolerated. Phase 2/3 randomized, controlled, double-blinded trials with long-term follow-up are needed to evaluate the therapeutic use of UC-MSCs to reduce deaths and improve long-term treatment outcomes in patients with serious COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/blood , Betacoronavirus/immunology , Cord Blood Stem Cell Transplantation/methods , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Hematopoietic Stem Cells/virology , Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Adult , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Betacoronavirus/drug effects , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Drug Combinations , Female , Glucocorticoids/therapeutic use , Hematopoietic Stem Cells/drug effects , Hematopoietic Stem Cells/immunology , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Immunoglobulin M/blood , Lopinavir , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Respiration, Artificial , Ritonavir , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Treatment Outcome
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