Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 32
Filter
Add filters

Year range
1.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-292402

ABSTRACT

Background: COVID-19 showed similar and overlapping symptoms compared with seasonal influenza. It is difficult to distinguish them, especially in the early stage of the outbreak. The confluence of the two diseases might result in considerable morbidity, it is doubtful that whether COVID-19 had already affected the morbidity of influenza earlier than the first report. Methods: . We conducted Kolmogorov-Smirnov Test and Kruskal Wallis Test to discover seasonal and regional distributions of influenza and COVID-19. Cluster analysis was utilized to explore possible influence factors. Spearman Test was carried out for analyzing correlations between the two diseases. We employed Arima Model to predict time series of WMI. We proved differences between the forecasted and the original time series of influenza from 2019 to 2021 by Mann-Whitney U Test. Then we observed first abnormal peaks on the time series, tracing back to the onset of COVID-19 affecting influenza compared with the first-report time. Results: . WMI and WMC varied significantly in four seasons, five continents and the ten selected countries. Cluster analysis divided the data into two groups according to country, continent, population and morbidity. WMI of China, Israel, Honduras, Morocco and Nigeria were correlated with WMC. The forecasted and the original time series of influenza from 2019 to 2021 were significantly different. Compared with the forecasted one, some abnormal peaks firstly appeared on the original time series of influenza around Dec.31st, 2018 on Austria, Norway, Morocco and Nigeria, Jan.28th, 2019 on South Africa, Apr.8th, 2019 on Marshall Islands, Jul.7th, 2019 on America, Sep.30th, 2019 on China and Israel, Mar.11th, 2020 on Honduras. Conclusions: . Winter and autumn were the high incidence season for influenza and COVID-19, respectively. Oceania and Americas owned the highest incidence rate for these two diseases. Human immunity, continents, countries’ policies and population were possible influence factors. Only in Honduras, the first reported COVID-19 case happened concurrently with the abnormal value of the ILI. And in the rest of the included countries, COVID-19 might happen earlier than its first reports. Among these regions, COVID-19 might firstly affect Africa in the first week of 2019.

3.
Ageing Res Rev ; 72: 101493, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1491714

ABSTRACT

Research on frailty has expanded in the last decade, but direct evidence supporting its implementation in clinical practice may be limited. This mapping review synthesizes the contexts-of-use and overall clinical applicability of recent pre-COVID frailty research. We sampled 476 articles from articles published on frailty in PubMed and EMBASE in 2017-2018, of which 150 articles were fully appraised for the contexts-of-use, definitions, and interventions. A clinical applicability framework was used to classify articles as practice-changing, practice-informing, or not practice-informing. Of the 476 sampled articles, 31% (n = 150) used frailty in functions that could inform a clinical indication: predictor or mediator (26%, n = 125), selection criterion (3%, n = 15), and effect modifier (2%, n = 10). Articles spanned all health disciplines, and cohort studies comprised 91% (n = 137) of studies and trials 9% (n = 13). Thirty-eight frailty definitions using varied cut-offs and a wide range of interventions were identified. Among all articles, 13% (n = 63) of articles were practice-informing, 2% (n = 11) potentially practice-changing, and 0.2% (n = 1) clearly practice-changing. Lack of well-defined intervention and identifiable effect (96%) or originality (83%) were predominant reasons reducing applicability. Only a minority of recent frailty research provides direct evidence of applicability to practice. Future research on frailty should focus on translating frailty, as a risk factor, into a clinical indication and address definition ambiguity.

4.
BMC Public Health ; 21(1): 1826, 2021 10 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1463239

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In the face of a sudden outbreak of COVID-19, it is essential to promote health communication, especially to reduce communication inequality. The paper targeted China to investigate whether social structural factors (education level and urban-rural differences) lead to the knowledge gap of COVID-19. Also, this paper examined whether media use, interpersonal communication, public communication, and perceived salience of information can influence the knowledge gap of COVID-19. Furthermore, this paper explored the strategies to promote communication equality. METHODS: An online survey on COVID-19 knowledge and its influencing factors was conducted in February 2020, with a valid sample of 981 participants. The dependent variable was the total score of knowledge related to COVID-19. In addition to demographic variables such as education level and residence, the main explanatory variables include four independent variables: the use of different media (print media, radio, television, Internet), interpersonal communication, public communication, and perceived salience of information. This paper utilized descriptive statistics, correlation analysis, and hierarchical multiple regression analysis for data processing. RESULTS: Descriptive statistics indicated that the Internet was the most frequent source of information for participants to obtain COVID-19 knowledge (M = 6.28, SD = 1.022). Bi-variate analysis and regression analysis presented that education level, Internet media use, and perceived salience of information predicted the difference in knowledge level. Hierarchical multiple regression showed that Internet media use significantly predicted differences in the level of knowledge related to COVID-19 among groups with different education levels. CONCLUSIONS: This study found a COVID-19 knowledge gap among the Chinese public, especially the digital knowledge gap. Education level, perceived salience of information, and internet media use can significantly predict the difference in COVID-19 knowledge level. In contrast, the use of traditional media such as newspaper, radio, and television, public communication, and interpersonal communication did not improve knowledge level. Internet media use and education level have an interactive effect on the formation of a COVID-19 knowledge gap. That is, online media use will expand the COVID-19 knowledge gap between groups with different education levels.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Communication , China , Cross-Sectional Studies , Health Promotion , Humans , Internet , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
5.
Applied Geography ; 136:102582, 2021.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-1446412

ABSTRACT

Local institutions have long been regarded as key drivers of economic development. However, little is known about the role of institutions in preparing places to cope with public health crises and pandemics. This paper sheds light on how the nature of a local institution, city autonomy, influenced variations in the incidence of the Black Death —possibly the worst pandemic ever recorded— across cities in Western Europe between 1347 and 1352. We examine urban autonomy not only because it represented a major political shift in medieval times, but because, more importantly, it also represents a key prototype of modern political institution. By exploiting data on the spatial variation of Black Death's mortality rates and duration using OLS and 2SLS methods, we uncover that city autonomy reduced mortality rates by, on average, almost 10 percent. Autonomous cities were in a better position to adopt swift and efficient measures against the pandemic than those governed by remote kings and emperors. This relationship has been confirmed by a series of placebo tests and robustness checks. In contrast, there is no evidence to suggest that city autonomy was a factor in reducing the duration of the pandemic in European cities.

6.
Front Endocrinol (Lausanne) ; 12: 727419, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1444039

ABSTRACT

Background: Blood parameters, such as neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio, have been identified as reliable inflammatory markers with diagnostic and predictive value for the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). However, novel hematological parameters derived from high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) have rarely been studied as indicators for the risk of poor outcomes in patients with severe acute respiratory syndrome-related coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection. Here, we aimed to assess the prognostic value of these novel biomarkers in COVID-19 patients and the diabetes subgroup. Methods: We conducted a multicenter retrospective cohort study involving all hospitalized patients with COVID-19 from January to March 2020 in five hospitals in Wuhan, China. Demographics, clinical and laboratory findings, and outcomes were recorded. Neutrophil to HDL-C ratio (NHR), monocyte to HDL-C ratio (MHR), lymphocyte to HDL-C ratio (LHR), and platelet to HDL-C ratio (PHR) were investigated and compared in both the overall population and the subgroup with diabetes. The associations between blood parameters at admission with primary composite end-point events (including mechanical ventilation, admission to the intensive care unit, or death) were analyzed using Cox proportional hazards regression models. Receiver operating characteristic curves were used to compare the utility of different blood parameters. Results: Of 440 patients with COVID-19, 67 (15.2%) were critically ill. On admission, HDL-C concentration was decreased while NHR was high in patients with critical compared with non-critical COVID-19, and were independently associated with poor outcome as continuous variables in the overall population (HR: 0.213, 95% CI 0.090-0.507; HR: 1.066, 95% CI 1.030-1.103, respectively) after adjusting for confounding factors. Additionally, when HDL-C and NHR were examined as categorical variables, the HRs and 95% CIs for tertile 3 vs. tertile 1 were 0.280 (0.128-0.612) and 4.458 (1.817-10.938), respectively. Similar results were observed in the diabetes subgroup. ROC curves showed that the NHR had good performance in predicting worse outcomes. The cutoff point of the NHR was 5.50. However, the data in our present study could not confirm the possible predictive effect of LHR, MHR, and PHR on COVID-19 severity. Conclusion: Lower HDL-C concentrations and higher NHR at admission were observed in patients with critical COVID-19 than in those with noncritical COVID-19, and were significantly associated with a poor prognosis in COVID-19 patients as well as in the diabetes subgroup.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , Cholesterol, HDL/blood , Diabetes Mellitus/blood , Aged , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/mortality , China , Diabetes Mellitus/diagnosis , Diabetes Mellitus/mortality , Female , Humans , Kaplan-Meier Estimate , Leukocytes/cytology , Male , Middle Aged , Prognosis , ROC Curve , Retrospective Studies , Severity of Illness Index
7.
Ann Palliat Med ; 10(6): 6180-6188, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1414022

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Since the outbreak of the novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), medical staff and affiliated healthcare staff are under both physical and psychological pressures. Due to this serious situation, it is extremely important to assess the prevalence and possible predictors of psychological distress in front-line, anti-epidemic medical staff. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted through the use of the network crowdsourcing platform (which provides functions equivalent to Amazon Mechanical Turk) in Jilin, China. A total of 725 Jilin medical staff who had returned from Wuhan participated in the survey. The collected data included demographics and psychological responses to COVID-19, and the following tests were used to measure the data: (I) the Social Support Rate Scale (SSRS) was used to measure the types and levels of social support that were received by the medical staff; (II) the Stanford Acute Stress Reaction Questionnaire (SASRQ) was used to evaluate anxiety and dissociation symptoms in the aftermath of traumatic events; (III) the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) was used to measure sleep quality; and (IV) the Kessler Psychological Distress Scale (K10) was used to evaluate nonspecific psychological distress. The χ2 test, Kruskal-Wallis test, ANOVA test and binary logistic regression were used to identify the factors that were correlated with psychological distress. RESULTS: In our study, 475 (65.5%) participants reported low psychological distress, and 72 (10%) participants reported high psychological distress. The results of the binary logistic regression analysis identified that the performance of physical activity in Wuhan (ß=-0.585; P<0.001; OR =0.557) and years of work experience (in contrast to approximately 0-5 years, approximately 6-15 years: ß=-1.258; P=0.008; OR =0.284, >15 years: ß=-0.562; P=0.016; OR =0.570) were protective factors for the possibility of having a mental disorder, whereas a high PSQI score (ß=0.106; P=0.024; OR =1.112) and a high SASRQ score (ß=0.242; P<0.001; OR =1.274) were risk factors. CONCLUSIONS: The high psychological distress (10%) of Jilin medical staff who returned from the front-line areas of Wuhan was higher than that in other studies. Medical staff with less physical activity and work experience in Wuhan, as well as high PSQI and SASRQ scores, had higher psychological distress.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Psychological Distress , Anxiety , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression , Disease Outbreaks , Humans , Medical Staff , Prevalence , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
8.
Integrative Respiratory Medicine ; 1, 2020.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1379353

ABSTRACT

The novel coronavirus pneumonia is an acute infectious disease caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). The global pandemic of this novel coronavirus pneumonia has greatly threatened human health and brought enormous economy losses. By the end of May 20, 2020, the pandemic of this disease had caused more than 2.70 million infections and more than 320 thousand deaths. This paper reviewed the recent advances in the treatment of the novel coronavirus pneumonia to provide basic references for disease control.

9.
Lancet Reg Health Am ; 3: 100051, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1364331

ABSTRACT

Background: The response of populations to public health measures may rely on the degree to which the population trusts sources of information and institutions. There has been little research in this area in the Caribbean. This exploratory study aimed to evaluate public trust in information sources, confidence in institutions and COVID-19 vaccine willingness in Trinidad and Tobago. Methods: An exploratory online survey was conducted in Trinidad and Tobago from November 10th to December 7th 2020. The survey instrument was a validated questionnaire developed by the World Health Organisation (WHO) and adapted to the local setting. Descriptive statistics and regression analyses were used to analyse the data. Findings: The most trusted sources of information included health workers (32.5%) and the ministry of health (23.6 %). Increasing levels of trust in the medical sector were associated with decreasing levels of believing misinformation. Overall, 62.8 % of participants said they would take the COVID-19 vaccine if available. Regression analyses showed those who agreed that everyone should adhere to the national immunization schedule and those who would take the flu vaccine, were 2.77 (95% CI 1.77-4.35) and 4.60 (95% CI 3.11-6.84) timesmore likely to take the vaccine, respectively. Interpretation: Our study found increasing trust in health sources, confidence in medical sector, adherence to the national immunisation schedule and acceptance of the flu vaccine may increase COVID-19 vaccine willingness rates. Although the generalisability of the findings is limited, the results of this exploratory survey may be used to identify areas for prioritisation and improvement in future research.

10.
International Journal of Financial Engineering ; 8(2), 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1322855

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 developed into an extremely serious pandemic by the middle of 2020. It has caused enormous negative impacts such as a crush to the global market. In this study, we tested the correlation between COVID-19 and stock market in a more intuitive way with the COVID-19 transmission rate and recovery rate. They were generated by using Unscented Kalman Filter method incorporated with SEIR model. Since the Unscented Kalman Filter method analyzes data at daily intervals, we can study the trend of COVID-19 development and the fund index rate change in detail.

11.
Pharmacol Res ; 161: 105127, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1318946

ABSTRACT

We formulated a traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) prescription, Hanshiyi Formula (HSYF), which was approved and promoted by the Wuhan Municipal Health Commission for treating mild and moderate coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). We aimed to evaluate the effect of HSYF on the progression to severe disease in mild and moderate COVID-19 patients. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of patients with mild and moderate COVID-19 in a quarantine station in Wuchang District, Wuhan. Using the real-time Internet information collection application and Centers for Disease Control for the Wuchang District, patient data were collected through patient self-reports and follow-ups. HSYF intervention was defined as the exposure. The primary outcome was the proportion of patients who progressed to a severe disease status, and a stratification analysis was performed. Univariate and multivariate regression analyses were performed to identify influencing factors that may affect the outcome. Further, we used propensity score matching (PSM) to assess the effect of HSYF intervention on the conversion of mild and moderate to a severe disease status. Totally, 721 mild and moderate COVID-19 patients were enrolled, including 430 HSYF users (exposed group) and 291 non-users (control group). No cases in the exposed group and 19 (6.5 %, P < 0.001) cases in the control group progressed to severe disease, and the difference between the two groups (exposed group-control group) was -6.5 % [95 % confidence interval (CI): (-8.87 %, -4.13 %)]. Univariate regression analysis revealed sex (male), age, fever, cough, and fatigue as risk factors for progression to severe disease. After PSM, none of the HSYF users and 7 (4.7 %, P = 0.022) non-users transitioned to severe disease, and the difference between the two groups (exposed group-control group) was -4.7 % [95 % CI: (-8.2 %, -1.2 %)]. Multivariate regression analysis revealed that sex (male) [OR: 3.145; 95 % CI: 1.036-9.545; P = 0.043] and age (> 48 years) [odds ratio (OR): 1.044; 95 % CI: 1.001-1.088; P = 0.044] were independent risk factors for conversion to severe disease. Therefore, HSYF can significantly reduce the progression to severe disease in patients with mild and moderate COVID-19, which may effectively prevent and treat the disease. However, further larger clinical studies are required to verify our results.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Drugs, Chinese Herbal/therapeutic use , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Child, Preschool , China , Cohort Studies , Disease Progression , Female , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Male , Middle Aged , Risk Factors , Sex Factors , Treatment Outcome , Young Adult
12.
PLoS One ; 16(5): e0245031, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1314324

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 infection causing the novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has been responsible for more than 2.8 million deaths and nearly 125 million infections worldwide as of March 2021. In March 2020, the World Health Organization determined that the COVID-19 outbreak is a global pandemic. The urgency and magnitude of this pandemic demanded immediate action and coordination between local, regional, national, and international actors. In that mission, researchers require access to high-quality biological materials and data from SARS-CoV-2 infected and uninfected patients, covering the spectrum of disease manifestations. The "Biobanque québécoise de la COVID-19" (BQC19) is a pan-provincial initiative undertaken in Québec, Canada to enable the collection, storage and sharing of samples and data related to the COVID-19 crisis. As a disease-oriented biobank based on high-quality biosamples and clinical data of hospitalized and non-hospitalized SARS-CoV-2 PCR positive and negative individuals. The BQC19 follows a legal and ethical management framework approved by local health authorities. The biosamples include plasma, serum, peripheral blood mononuclear cells and DNA and RNA isolated from whole blood. In addition to the clinical variables, BQC19 will provide in-depth analytical data derived from the biosamples including whole genome and transcriptome sequencing, proteome and metabolome analyses, multiplex measurements of key circulating markers as well as anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibody responses. BQC19 will provide the scientific and medical communities access to data and samples to better understand, manage and ultimately limit, the impact of COVID-19. In this paper we present BQC19, describe the process according to which it is governed and organized, and address opportunities for future research collaborations. BQC19 aims to be a part of a global communal effort addressing the challenges of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Biological Specimen Banks/organization & administration , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/metabolism , Humans , Information Dissemination/methods , Pandemics , Quebec/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
13.
Ann Palliat Med ; 10(7): 7329-7339, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1311480

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: This study aimed to build a radiomics model with deep learning (DL) and human auditing and examine its diagnostic value in differentiating between coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). METHODS: Forty-three COVID-19 patients, whose diagnoses had been confirmed with reverse-transcriptase polymerase-chain-reaction (RT-PCR) tests, and 60 CAP patients, whose diagnoses had been confirmed with sputum cultures, were enrolled in this retrospective study. The candidate regions of interest (ROIs) on the computed tomography (CT) images of the 103 patients were determined using a DL-based segmentation model powered by transfer learning. These ROIs were manually audited and corrected by 3 radiologists (with an average of 12 years of experience; range 6-17 years) to check the segmentation acceptance for the radiomics analysis. ROI-derived radiomics features were subsequently extracted to build the classification model and processed using 4 different algorithms (L1 regularization, Lasso, Ridge, and Z test) and 4 classifiers, including the logistic regression (LR), multi-layer perceptron (MLP), support vector machine (SVM), and extreme Gradient Boosting (XGboost). A receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) analysis was conducted to evaluate the performance of the model. RESULTS: Quantitative CT measurements derived from human-audited segmentation results showed that COVID-19 patients had significantly decreased numbers of infected lobes compared to patients in the CAP group {median [interquartile range (IQR)]: 4 [3, 4] and 4 [4, 5]; P=0.031}. The infected percentage (%) of the whole lung was significantly more elevated in the CAP group [6.40 (2.77, 11.11)] than the COVID-19 group [1.83 (0.65, 4.42); P<0.001], and the same trend applied to each lobe, except for the superior lobe of the right lung [1.81 (0.09, 5.28) for COVID-19 vs. 1.32 (0.14, 7.02) for CAP; P=0.649]. Additionally, the highest proportion of infected lesions were observed in the CT value range of (-470, -370) Hounsfield units (HU) in the COVID-19 group. Conversely, the CAP group had a value range of (30, 60) HU. Radiomic model using corrected ROIs exhibited the highest area under ROC (AUC) of 0.990 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.962-1.000] using Lasso for feature selection and MLP for classification. CONCLUSIONS: The proposed radiomics model based on human-audited segmentation made accurate differential diagnoses of COVID-19 and CAP. The quantification of CT measurements derived from DL could potentially be used as effective biomarkers in current clinical practice.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Deep Learning , Computers , Humans , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
14.
Front Immunol ; 12: 686240, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1285294

ABSTRACT

A disruption of the crosstalk between the gut and the lung has been implicated as a driver of severity during respiratory-related diseases. Lung injury causes systemic inflammation, which disrupts gut barrier integrity, increasing the permeability to gut microbes and their products. This exacerbates inflammation, resulting in positive feedback. We aimed to test whether severe Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is associated with markers of disrupted gut permeability. We applied a multi-omic systems biology approach to analyze plasma samples from COVID-19 patients with varying disease severity and SARS-CoV-2 negative controls. We investigated the potential links between plasma markers of gut barrier integrity, microbial translocation, systemic inflammation, metabolome, lipidome, and glycome, and COVID-19 severity. We found that severe COVID-19 is associated with high levels of markers of tight junction permeability and translocation of bacterial and fungal products into the blood. These markers of disrupted intestinal barrier integrity and microbial translocation correlate strongly with higher levels of markers of systemic inflammation and immune activation, lower levels of markers of intestinal function, disrupted plasma metabolome and glycome, and higher mortality rate. Our study highlights an underappreciated factor with significant clinical implications, disruption in gut functions, as a potential force that may contribute to COVID-19 severity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Gastrointestinal Microbiome/immunology , Inflammation/immunology , Intestines/physiology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Female , Glycomics , Haptoglobins/metabolism , Humans , Lipidomics , Male , Metabolomics , Middle Aged , Permeability , Protein Precursors/metabolism , Tight Junctions/metabolism
15.
Clin Chem ; 67(4): 672-683, 2021 03 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1165392

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Infectious disease outbreaks such as the COVID-19 (coronavirus disease 2019) pandemic call for rapid response and complete screening of the suspected community population to identify potential carriers of pathogens. Central laboratories rely on time-consuming sample collection methods that are rarely available in resource-limited settings. METHODS: We present a highly automated and fully integrated mobile laboratory for fast deployment in response to infectious disease outbreaks. The mobile laboratory was equipped with a 6-axis robot arm for automated oropharyngeal swab specimen collection; virus in the collected specimen was inactivated rapidly using an infrared heating module. Nucleic acid extraction and nested isothermal amplification were performed by a "sample in, answer out" laboratory-on-a-chip system, and the result was automatically reported by the onboard information platform. Each module was evaluated using pseudovirus or clinical samples. RESULTS: The mobile laboratory was stand-alone and self-sustaining and capable of on-site specimen collection, inactivation, analysis, and reporting. The automated sampling robot arm achieved sampling efficiency comparable to manual collection. The collected samples were inactivated in as short as 12 min with efficiency comparable to a water bath without damage to nucleic acid integrity. The limit of detection of the integrated microfluidic nucleic acid analyzer reached 150 copies/mL within 45 min. Clinical evaluation of the onboard microfluidic nucleic acid analyzer demonstrated good consistency with reverse transcription quantitative PCR with a κ coefficient of 0.979. CONCLUSIONS: The mobile laboratory provides a promising solution for fast deployment of medical diagnostic resources at critical junctions of infectious disease outbreaks and facilitates local containment of SARS-CoV-2 (severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2) transmission.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing/methods , COVID-19/diagnosis , Laboratories , Mobile Health Units , Pathology, Molecular/methods , RNA, Viral/analysis , Adult , Automobiles , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing/instrumentation , Female , Humans , Lab-On-A-Chip Devices , Male , Microfluidic Analytical Techniques/instrumentation , Microfluidic Analytical Techniques/methods , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/chemistry , Molecular Diagnostic Techniques/instrumentation , Molecular Diagnostic Techniques/methods , Pandemics , Pathology, Molecular/instrumentation , Robotics , SARS-CoV-2/chemistry
16.
Front Med (Lausanne) ; 8: 634949, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1120248

ABSTRACT

Background: The impact of delivery mode on the infection rates of Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in the newborn remains unknown. We aimed to summarize the existing literature on COVID-19 infection during pregnancy to evaluate which mode of delivery is better for preventing possible vertical transmission from a pregnant mother confirmed with COVID-19 to a neonate. Methods: We performed a comprehensive literature search of PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, Google Scholar, and the Chinese Biomedical Literature database (CBM) from 31 December 2019 to 18 June 2020. We applied no language restrictions. We screened abstracts for relevance, extracted data, and assessed the risk of bias in duplicate. We rated the certainty of evidence using the GRADE approach. The primary outcome was severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) test positivity in neonates born to mothers with confirmed COVID-19 following different delivery modes. Secondary outcomes were neonatal deaths and maternal deaths. This study is registered with PROSPERO, CRD42020194049. Results: Sixty-eight observational studies meeting inclusion criteria were included in the current study, with no randomized controlled trials. In total, information on the mode of delivery, detailed neonatal outcomes, and SARS-CoV-2 status were available for 1,019 pregnant women and 1,035 neonates. Six hundred and eighteen (59.71%) neonates were born through cesarean section and 417(40.29%) through vaginal delivery. Probable congenital SARS-CoV-2 infections were reported in 34/1,035 (3.29%) neonates. Of babies born vaginally, 9/417 (2.16%) were tested positive compared with 25/618 (4.05%) born by cesarean. Of babies born vaginally, 0/417 (0.00%) neonatal deaths were reported compared with 6/618 (0.97%) born by cesarean. Of women who delivered vaginally, 1/416 (0.24%) maternal deaths were reported compared with 11/603 (1.82%) delivered by cesarean. Two women died before delivery. Sensitivity analyses and subgroup analyses showed similar findings. Conclusions: The rate of neonatal COVID-19 infection, neonatal deaths, and maternal deaths are no greater when the mother gave birth through vaginal delivery. Based on the evidence available, there is no sufficient evidence supporting that the cesarean section is better than vaginal delivery in preventing possible vertical transmission from a pregnant mother confirmed with COVID-19 to a neonate. The mode of birth should be individualized and based on disease severity and obstetric indications. Additional good-quality studies with comprehensive serial tests from multiple specimens are urgently needed. Study registration: PROSPERO CRD42020194049.

17.
International Journal of Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics ; 59(3):175, 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1103059
19.
Preprint | SSRN | ID: ppcovidwho-5719

ABSTRACT

Background: There had been a preliminary occurrence of human-to-human transmissions between healthcare workers (HCWs), but risk factors in the susceptibility

20.
Travel Med Infect Dis ; 39: 101950, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-966342

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: To investigate and compare the clinical and imaging features among family members infected with COVID-19. METHODS: We retrospectively collected a total of 34 COVID-19 cases (15 male, 19 female, aged 48 ± 16 years, ranging from 10 to 81 years) from 13 families from January 17, 2020 through February 15, 2020. Patients were divided into two groups: Group 1 - part of the family members (first-generation) who had exposure history and others (second-generation) infected through them, and Group 2 - patients from the same family having identical exposure history. We collected clinical symptoms, laboratory findings, and high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) features for each patient. Comparison tests were performed between the first- and second-generation patients in Group 1. RESULTS: In total there were 21 patients in Group 1 and 20 patients in Group 2. For Group 1, first-generation patients had significantly higher white blood cell count (6.5 × 109/L (interquartile range (IQR): 4.9-9.2 × 109/L) vs 4.5 × 109/L (IQR: 3.7-5.3 × 109/L); P = 0.0265), higher neutrophil count (4.9 × 109/L (IQR: 3.6-7.3 × 109/L) vs 2.9 × 109/L (IQR: 2.1-3.3 × 109/L); P = 0.0111), and higher severity scores on HRCT (3.9 ± 2.4 vs 2.0 ± 1.3, P = 0.0362) than the second-generation patients. Associated underlying diseases (odds ratio, 8.0, 95% confidence interval: 3.4-18.7, P = 0.0013) were significantly correlated with radiologic severity scores in second-generation patients. CONCLUSION: Analysis of the family cluster cases suggests that COVID-19 had no age or sex predominance. Secondarily infected patients in a family tended to develop milder illness, but this was not true for those with existing comorbidities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Family , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Child , China/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL
...