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1.
Ann Transl Med ; 9(18): 1446, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1436465

ABSTRACT

Background: The rapid spread of coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) poses a global health emergency, and cases entering China from Russia are quite diverse. This study explored and compared the clinical characteristics and outcomes of severe and critically ill COVID-19 patients from Russia with and without influenza A infection, treated in a northern Chinese hospital (Russia imported patients). Methods: A total of 32 severe and critically ill Russia-imported COVID-19 patients treated in the Heilongjiang Imported Severe and Critical COVID-19 Treatment Center from April 6 to May 11, 2020 were included, including 8 cases (group A) with and 24 cases (group B) without influenza A infection. The clinical characteristics of each group were compared, including prolonged hospital stay, duration of oxygen therapy, time from onset to a negative SARS-CoV-2 qRT-PCR RNA (Tneg) result, and duration of bacterial infection. Results: The results showed that blood group, PaO2/FiO2, prothrombin time (PT), prothrombin activity (PTA), computed tomography (CT) score, hospital stay, duration of oxygenation therapy, Tneg, and duration of bacterial infection were statistically different between the two groups (P<0.05). Multivariant regression analysis showed that the Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score, C-reactive protein (CRP), and influenza A infection were factors influencing hospital stay; SOFA score, CRP, and CT score were factors influencing the duration of oxygenation therapy; PaO2/FiO2, platelet count (PLT), and CRP were factors influencing Tneg; and gender, SOFA score, and influenza A infection were factors influencing the duration of bacterial infection. Conclusions: Influenza A infection is common in Russia-imported COVID-19 patients, which can prolong the hospital stay and duration of bacterial infection. Routinely screening and treating influenza A should be conducted early in such patients.

3.
Talanta ; 235: 122800, 2021 Dec 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1356463

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic brings unprecedented crisis for public health and economics in the world. Detecting specific antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 is a powerful supplement for the diagnosis of COVID-19 and is important for epidemiological studies and vaccine validations. Herein, a rapid and quantitative detection method of anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibody was built based on the optofluidic point-of-care testing fluorescence biosensor. Without complicated steps needed, the portable system is suitable for on-site sensitive determination of anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibody in serum. Under the optimal conditions, the whole detection procedure is about 25 min with a detection limit of 12.5 ng/mL that can well meet the diagnostic requirements. The method was not obviously affected by IgM and serum matrix and demonstrated to have good stability and reliability in real sample analysis. Compared to ELISA test results, the proposed method exhibits several advantages including wider measurement range and easier operation. The method provides a universal platform for rapid and quantitative analysis of other related biomarkers, which is of significance for the prevention and control of COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Biosensing Techniques , COVID-19 , Antibodies, Viral , Humans , Immunoassay , Immunoglobulin G , Immunoglobulin M , Pandemics , Point-of-Care Testing , Reproducibility of Results , SARS-CoV-2 , Sensitivity and Specificity
4.
Med Sci Monit ; 27: e929708, 2021 Apr 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1148368

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND Since the outbreak of COVID-19 in December 2019, there have been 96 623 laboratory-confirmed cases and 4784 deaths by December 29 in China. We aimed to analyze the risk factors and the incidence of thrombosis from patients with confirmed COVID-19 pneumonia. MATERIAL AND METHODS Eighty-eight inpatients with confirmed COVID-19 pneumonia were reported (31 critical cases, 33 severe cases, and 24 common cases). The thrombosis risk factor assessment, laboratory results, ultrasonographic findings, and prognoses of these patients were analyzed, and compared among groups with different severity. RESULTS Nineteen of the 88 cases developed DVT (12 critical cases, 7 severe cases, and no common cases). In addition, among the 18 patients who died, 5 were diagnosed with DVT. Positive correlations were observed between the increase in D-dimer level (≥5 µg/mL) and the severity of COVID-19 pneumonia (r=0.679, P<0.01), and between the high Padua score (≥4) and the severity (r=0.799, P<0.01). In addition, the CRP and LDH levels on admission had positive correlations with the severity of illness (CRP: r=0.522, P<0.01; LDH: r=0.600, P<0.01). A negative correlation was observed between the lymphocyte count on admission and the severity of illness (r=-0.523, P<0.01). There was also a negative correlation between the lymphocyte count on admission and mortality in critical patients (r=-0.499, P<0.01). Univariable logistic regression analysis showed that the occurrence of DVT was positively correlated with disease severity (crude odds ratio: 3.643, 95% CI: 1.218-10.896, P<0.05). CONCLUSIONS Our report illustrates that critically or severely ill patients have an associated high D-dimer value and high Padua score, and illustrates that a low threshold to screen for DVT may help improve detection of thromboembolism in these groups of patients, especially in asymptomatic patients. Our results suggest that early administration of prophylactic anticoagulant would benefit the prognosis of critical patients with COVID-19 pneumonia and would likely reduce thromboembolic rates.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/analysis , Venous Thrombosis/epidemiology , Adult , Aged , Asymptomatic Diseases , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19 Testing , China/epidemiology , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Incidence , Lower Extremity/blood supply , Lower Extremity/diagnostic imaging , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Admission , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , Risk Assessment/methods , Risk Assessment/statistics & numerical data , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Severity of Illness Index , Ultrasonography , Venous Thrombosis/blood , Venous Thrombosis/diagnosis , Venous Thrombosis/etiology
6.
Bosn J Basic Med Sci ; 21(2): 235-241, 2021 Apr 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-745645

ABSTRACT

Peripheral blood lymphocyte count is shown to be decreased in patients with COVID-19 in the early stage of the disease. The degree of lymphocyte count reduction is related to COVID-19 severity and could be used as an indicator to reflect the disease severity. Our aim was to investigate the value of lymphocyte count in determining COVID-19 severity and estimating the time for SARS-CoV-2 nucleic acid test results to turn negative. We retrospectively analyzed clinical data of 201 patients with severe and critical COVID-19. The patients were admitted to the West Campus of Union Hospital of Tongji Medical College of Huazhong University of Science and Technology. The data included age, gender, chronic disease, lymphocyte count, and SARS-CoV-2 nucleic acid test results. The age of patients in critically ill group was higher than in severely ill group (p = 0.019). The lymphocyte count of critically ill patients was lower than of severely ill patients. The cutoff value of lymphocyte count to distinguish between the critically ill and the severely ill was 0.735 × 109/L (p = 0.001). The cutoff value of lymphocyte count for SARS-CoV-2 nucleic acid test results turning negative in severely and critically ill patients with chronic diseases (hypertension, diabetes, and coronary heart disease) was 0.835 × 109/L (p = 0.017). The cutoff value of lymphocyte count for SARS-CoV-2 nucleic acid test results turning negative in severely and critically ill male patients was 0.835 × 109/L (p < 0.0001). Lymphocyte count could be an effective indicator to predict COVID-19 severity. It may also be useful in determining the time for nucleic acid test results to turn negative in COVID-19 patients with underlying chronic diseases or male COVID-19 patients with severe and critical conditions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing , COVID-19/immunology , Lymphocyte Count , SARS-CoV-2 , Aged , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/virology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Severity of Illness Index
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