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1.
PLoS Pathog ; 18(2): e1010343, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1690680

ABSTRACT

The continuous emergence of severe acute respiratory coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) variants and the increasing number of breakthrough infection cases among vaccinated people support the urgent need for research and development of antiviral drugs. Viral entry is an intriguing target for antiviral drug development. We found that diltiazem, a blocker of the L-type calcium channel Cav1.2 pore-forming subunit (Cav1.2 α1c) and an FDA-approved drug, inhibits the binding and internalization of SARS-CoV-2, and decreases SARS-CoV-2 infection in cells and mouse lung. Cav1.2 α1c interacts with SARS-CoV-2 spike protein and ACE2, and affects the attachment and internalization of SARS-CoV-2. Our finding suggests that diltiazem has potential as a drug against SARS-CoV-2 infection and that Cav1.2 α1c is a promising target for antiviral drug development for COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diltiazem/pharmacology , Lung/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , A549 Cells , Animals , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Cells, Cultured , Chlorocebus aethiops , Diltiazem/therapeutic use , Disease Models, Animal , Female , HEK293 Cells , HeLa Cells , Humans , Lung/pathology , Lung/virology , Mice , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Mice, Transgenic , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Vero Cells , Virus Attachment/drug effects , Virus Internalization/drug effects
2.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-324160

ABSTRACT

The unprecedented coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) epidemic has created a worldwide public health emergency, and there is an urgent need to develop an effective vaccine to control this severe infectious disease. Here, we found that a single vaccination with a replication-defective human type 5 adenovirus encoding the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein (Ad5-nCoV) protected mice completely against SARS-CoV-2 infection in the upper and lower respiratory tracts. Additionally, a single vaccination with Ad5-nCoV protected ferrets from SARS-CoV-2 infection in the upper respiratory tract. This study suggested that a combination of intramuscular and mucosal vaccination maybe provide a desirable protective efficacy and different Ad5-nCoV delivery modes are worth further investigation in human clinical trials.

3.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-307411

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is the causative pathogen of novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)1. SARS-CoV-2 uses angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) as a cellular receptor and enters cells via clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME)2-4. However, the key molecules involved in internalizing and facilitating CME for virus entry remain unknown. Here, we found metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 2 (mGluR2) is a key entry receptor for SARS-CoV-2 infection. mGluR2 directly interacts with the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein. Knockdown of mGluR2 decreases endocytosis of SARS-CoV-2 but not cell binding. mGluR2 cooperates with ACE2 to facilitate SARS-CoV-2 entry through CME. Knockout of the mGluR2 gene in mice abolished SARS-CoV-2 infection in the nasal turbinates and significantly reduced viral infection in the lungs. Importantly, mGluR2 also is important for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus spike protein and Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus spike protein mediated endocytosis. Our study provides important insights into SARS-CoV-2 infection and reveals an important target for the development of novel approaches to limit coronavirus infection.

5.
Cell Discov ; 7(1): 119, 2021 Dec 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1569245

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) uses angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) as a binding receptor to enter cells via clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME). However, receptors involved in other steps of SARS-CoV-2 infection remain largely unknown. Here, we found that metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 2 (mGluR2) is an internalization factor for SARS-CoV-2. Our results show that mGluR2 directly interacts with the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein and that knockdown of mGluR2 decreases internalization of SARS-CoV-2 but not cell binding. Further, mGluR2 is uncovered to cooperate with ACE2 to facilitate SARS-CoV-2 internalization through CME and mGluR2 knockout in mice abolished SARS-CoV-2 infection in the nasal turbinates and significantly reduced viral infection in the lungs. Notably, mGluR2 is also important for SARS-CoV spike protein- and Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus spike protein-mediated internalization. Thus, our study identifies a novel internalization factor used by SARS-CoV-2 and opens a new door for antiviral development against coronavirus infection.

6.
J Health Psychol ; : 13591053211021651, 2021 Jun 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1277874

ABSTRACT

Data from a longitudinal questionnaire investigation of three time waves were used to investigate affective and behavioral changes and their covariant relationship among Chinese general population during the COVID-19 pandemic from March to May 2020. 145 participants aging from 15 to 63 completed three waves of survey. Latent growth curve analyses found that negative affect gradually increased as the pandemic continued. A faster increase in negative affect was related to a greater decrease in adaptive behavior and faster increase in non-adaptive behavior. A higher initial level of negative affect was related to a slower increase in non-adaptive behavior.

7.
Curr Psychol ; : 1-9, 2021 Jan 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1061049

ABSTRACT

Since the outbreak of 2019 coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in December 2019, the Chinese government has implemented effective epidemic prevention measures. To provide useful information for governments to manage this public health crisis, we conducted an online survey among Chinese general population from February 24 to 28, 2020. In this study, we examined the impact of epidemic information and rumors on public's worries and attitude toward prevention measures during the outbreak of COVID-19. A total of 853 valid questionnaires (641 women, 75.1%) were collected from 24 provincial regions in China. Most respondents' ages ranged from 18 to 60 (833 participants, 97.66%). A mediation model was built to analyze the influence of epidemic information and rumors on worries and attitude. The results showed that the amount of epidemic information positively predicted public's worries, which in turn predicted a supportive attitude toward the prevention measures. Worries partially mediated the relationship between the amount of epidemic information and the supportive attitude. The amount of rumors negatively predicted the supportive attitude. The results of this study implied the importance of timely and credible information providing to evoke a certain level of worry and promote public cooperation, and the necessary attention to refute and resist rumors for effective risk communication in a public health crisis.

8.
Natl Sci Rev ; 8(3): nwaa291, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-977391

ABSTRACT

Minks are raised in many countries and have transmitted severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) to humans. However, the biologic properties of SARS-CoV-2 in minks are largely unknown. Here, we investigated and found that SARS-CoV-2 replicates efficiently in both the upper and lower respiratory tracts, and transmits efficiently in minks via respiratory droplets; pulmonary lesions caused by SARS-CoV-2 in minks are similar to those seen in humans with COVID-19. We further found that a spike protein-based subunit vaccine largely prevented SARS-CoV-2 replication and lung damage caused by SARS-CoV-2 infection in minks. Our study indicates that minks are a useful animal model for evaluating the efficacy of drugs or vaccines against COVID-19 and that vaccination is a potential strategy to prevent minks from transmitting SARS-CoV-2.

9.
Nat Commun ; 11(1): 4081, 2020 08 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-717117

ABSTRACT

The unprecedented coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) epidemic has created a worldwide public health emergency, and there is an urgent need to develop an effective vaccine to control this severe infectious disease. Here, we find that a single vaccination with a replication-defective human type 5 adenovirus encoding the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein (Ad5-nCoV) protect mice completely against mouse-adapted SARS-CoV-2 infection in the upper and lower respiratory tracts. Additionally, a single vaccination with Ad5-nCoV protects ferrets from wild-type SARS-CoV-2 infection in the upper respiratory tract. This study suggests that the mucosal vaccination may provide a desirable protective efficacy and this delivery mode is worth further investigation in human clinical trials.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Viral Vaccines/immunology , Animals , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Vaccines , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Disease Models, Animal , Drug Design , Female , Genetic Vectors , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Mice , Mice, Inbred BALB C , SARS-CoV-2 , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Viral Vaccines/administration & dosage , Viral Vaccines/genetics
11.
Science ; 368(6494): 1016-1020, 2020 05 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-45712

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) causes the infectious disease COVID-19 (coronavirus disease 2019), which was first reported in Wuhan, China, in December 2019. Despite extensive efforts to control the disease, COVID-19 has now spread to more than 100 countries and caused a global pandemic. SARS-CoV-2 is thought to have originated in bats; however, the intermediate animal sources of the virus are unknown. In this study, we investigated the susceptibility of ferrets and animals in close contact with humans to SARS-CoV-2. We found that SARS-CoV-2 replicates poorly in dogs, pigs, chickens, and ducks, but ferrets and cats are permissive to infection. Additionally, cats are susceptible to airborne transmission. Our study provides insights into the animal models for SARS-CoV-2 and animal management for COVID-19 control.


Subject(s)
Animals, Domestic , Betacoronavirus/physiology , Coronavirus Infections , Disease Models, Animal , Disease Susceptibility , Ferrets , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Animals , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Betacoronavirus/immunology , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , COVID-19 , Cats , Chickens , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Dogs , Ducks , Feces/virology , Female , Male , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , RNA, Viral/isolation & purification , Respiratory System/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Species Specificity , Sus scrofa , Virus Attachment , Virus Replication
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