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2.
EuropePMC; 2022.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-335494

ABSTRACT

Recent emergence of SARS-CoV-2 Omicron sublineages BA.2.12.1, BA.2.13, BA.4 and BA.5 all contain L452 mutations and show potential higher transmissibility over BA.2. The new variants’ receptor binding and immune evasion capability require immediate investigation, especially on the role of L452 substitutions. Herein, coupled with structural comparisons, we showed that BA.2 sublineages, including BA.2.12.1 and BA.2.13, exhibit increased ACE2-binding affinities compared to BA.1;while BA.4/BA.5 shows the weakest receptor-binding activity due to F486V and R493Q reversion. Importantly, compared to BA.2, BA.2.12.1 and BA.4/BA.5 exhibit stronger neutralization escape from the plasma of 3-dose vaccinees and, most strikingly, from vaccinated BA.1 convalescents. To delineate the underlying evasion mechanism, we determined the escaping mutation profiles, epitope distribution and Omicron sub-lineage neutralization efficacy of 1640 RBD-directed neutralizing antibodies (NAbs), including 614 isolated from BA.1 convalescents. Interestingly, post-vaccination BA.1 infection mainly recalls wildtype-induced humoral memory and elicits antibodies that neutralize both wild-type and BA.1. These cross-reactive NAbs are significantly enriched on non-ACE2-competing epitopes;and surprisingly, the majority are undermined by R346 and L452 substitutions, namely R346K (BA.1.1), L452M (BA.2.13), L452Q (BA.2.12.1) and L452R (BA.4/BA.5), suggesting that R346K and L452 mutations appeared under the immune pressure of Omicron convalescents. Nevertheless, BA.1 infection can also induce new clones of BA.1-specific antibodies that potently neutralize BA.1 but do not respond to wild-type SARS-CoV-2, due to the high susceptibility to N501, N440, K417 and E484. However, these NAbs are largely escaped by BA.2 sublineages and BA.4/BA.5 due to D405N and F486V, exhibiting poor neutralization breadths. As for therapeutic NAbs, LY-CoV1404 (Bamlanivimab) and COV2-2130 (Cilgavimab) can still effectively neutralize BA.2.12.1 and BA.4/BA.5, while the S371F, D405N and R408S mutations carried by BA.2/BA.4/BA.5 sublineages would undermine most broad sarbecovirus NAbs. Together, our results indicate that Omicron can evolve mutations to specifically evade humoral immunity elicited by BA.1 infection. The continuous evolution of Omicron poses great challenges to SARS-CoV-2 herd immunity and suggests that BA.1-derived vaccine boosters may not be ideal for achieving broad-spectrum protection.

3.
EuropePMC; 2022.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-335258

ABSTRACT

The recently emerged SARS-CoV-2 Omicron sublineages BA.2.12.1, BA.2.13, BA.4 and BA.5 all contain L452 mutations and show potential higher transmissibility over BA.2 1 . The new variants’ receptor binding and immune evasion capability require immediate investigation, especially on the role of L452 substitutions. Herein, coupled with structural comparisons, we show that BA.2 sublineages, including BA.2.12.1 and BA.2.13, exhibit increased ACE2-binding affinities compared to BA.1;while BA.4/BA.5 displays the weakest receptor-binding activity due to F486V and R493Q reversion. Importantly, compared to BA.2, BA.2.12.1 and BA.4/BA.5 exhibit stronger neutralization evasion against the plasma of 3-dose vaccinees and, most strikingly, of vaccinated BA.1 convalescents. To delineate the underlying evasion mechanism, we determined the escaping mutation profiles 2 , epitope distribution 3 and Omicron sublineage neutralization efficacy of 1640 RBD-directed neutralizing antibodies (NAbs), including 614 isolated from BA.1 convalescents. Interestingly, post-vaccination BA.1 infection mainly recalls wildtype (WT) induced humoral memory and elicits antibodies that neutralize both WT and BA.1. These cross-reactive NAbs are significantly enriched on non-ACE2-competing epitopes;and surprisingly, the majority are undermined by R346 and L452 substitutions, namely R346K (BA.1.1), L452M (BA.2.13), L452Q (BA.2.12.1) and L452R (BA.4/BA.5), suggesting that R346K and L452 mutations appeared under the immune pressure induced by Omicron convalescents. Nevertheless, BA.1 infection can also induce new clones of BA.1-specific antibodies that potently neutralize BA.1 but do not respond to WT SARS-CoV-2 due to the high susceptibility to N501, N440, K417 and E484. However, these NAbs are largely escaped by BA.2 sublineages and BA.4/BA.5 due to D405N and F486V, exhibiting poor neutralization breadths. As for therapeutic NAbs, LY-CoV1404 (Bebtelovimab 4 ) and COV2-2130 (Cilgavimab 5 ) can still effectively neutralize BA.2.12.1 and BA.4/BA.5, while the S371F, D405N and R408S mutations carried by BA.2/BA.4/BA.5 sublineages would undermine most broad sarbecovirus NAbs. Together, our results indicate that Omicron can evolve mutations to specifically evade humoral immunity elicited by BA.1 infection. The continuous evolution of Omicron poses great challenges to SARS-CoV-2 herd immunity and suggests that BA.1-derived vaccine boosters may not be ideal for achieving broad-spectrum protection.

4.
Signal Transduct Target Ther ; 7(1): 124, 2022 04 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1795804

ABSTRACT

Variants of concern (VOCs) like Delta and Omicron, harbor a high number of mutations, which aid these viruses in escaping a majority of known SARS-CoV-2 neutralizing antibodies (NAbs). In this study, Rhesus macaques immunized with 2-dose inactivated vaccines (Coronavac) were boosted with an additional dose of homologous vaccine or an RBD-subunit vaccine, or a bivalent inactivated vaccine (Beta and Delta) to determine the effectiveness of sequential immunization. The booster vaccination significantly enhanced the duration and levels of neutralizing antibody titers against wild-type, Beta, Delta, and Omicron. Animals administered with an indicated booster dose and subsequently challenged with Delta or Omicron variants showed markedly reduced viral loads and improved histopathological profiles compared to control animals, indicating that sequential immunization could protect primates against Omicron. These results suggest that sequential immunization of inactivated vaccines or polyvalent vaccines could be a potentially effective countermeasure against newly emerging variants.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Animals , Antibodies, Neutralizing , Antibodies, Viral , COVID-19/prevention & control , Macaca mulatta , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Vaccination , Vaccines, Inactivated/genetics
5.
EuropePMC; 2022.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-331876

ABSTRACT

Middle East Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) and several bat coronaviruses employ Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP4) as their functional receptors. However, the receptor for NeoCoV, the closest MERS-CoV relative yet discovered in bats, remains enigmatic. In this study, we unexpectedly found that NeoCoV and its close relative, PDF-2180-CoV, can efficiently use some types of bat Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) and, less favorably, human ACE2 for entry. The two viruses use their spikes' S1 subunit carboxyl-terminal domains (S1-CTD) for high-affinity and species-specific ACE2 binding. Cryo-electron microscopy analysis revealed a novel coronavirus-ACE2 binding interface and a protein-glycan interaction, distinct from other known ACE2-using viruses. We identified a molecular determinant close to the viral binding interface that restricts human ACE2 from supporting NeoCoV infection, especially around residue Asp338. Conversely, NeoCoV efficiently infects human ACE2 expressing cells after a T510F mutation on the receptor-binding motif (RBM). Notably, the infection could not be cross-neutralized by antibodies targeting SARS-CoV-2 or MERS-CoV. Our study demonstrates the first case of ACE2 usage in MERS-related viruses, shedding light on a potential bio-safety threat of the human emergence of an ACE2 using "MERS-CoV-2" with both high fatality and transmission rate.

6.
Innovation (Camb) ; 3(2): 100221, 2022 Mar 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1713028

ABSTRACT

The highly pathogenic and readily transmissible SARS-CoV-2 has caused a global coronavirus pandemic, urgently requiring effective countermeasures against its rapid expansion. All available vaccine platforms are being used to generate safe and effective COVID-19 vaccines. Here, we generated a live-attenuated candidate vaccine strain by serial passaging of a SARS-CoV-2 clinical isolate in Vero cells. Deep sequencing revealed the dynamic adaptation of SARS-CoV-2 in Vero cells, resulting in a stable clone with a deletion of seven amino acids (N679SPRRAR685) at the S1/S2 junction of the S protein (named VAS5). VAS5 showed significant attenuation of replication in multiple human cell lines, human airway epithelium organoids, and hACE2 mice. Viral fitness competition assays demonstrated that VAS5 showed specific tropism to Vero cells but decreased fitness in human cells compared with the parental virus. More importantly, a single intranasal injection of VAS5 elicited a high level of neutralizing antibodies and prevented SARS-CoV-2 infection in mice as well as close-contact transmission in golden Syrian hamsters. Structural and biochemical analysis revealed a stable and locked prefusion conformation of the S trimer of VAS5, which most resembles SARS-CoV-2-3Q-2P, an advanced vaccine immunogen (NVAX-CoV2373). Further systematic antigenic profiling and immunogenicity validation confirmed that the VAS5 S trimer presents an enhanced antigenic mimic of the wild-type S trimer. Our results not only provide a potent live-attenuated vaccine candidate against COVID-19 but also clarify the molecular and structural basis for the highly attenuated and super immunogenic phenotype of VAS5.

7.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-311706

ABSTRACT

The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic poses an unprecedented public health crisis. Accumulating evidences suggest that SARS-CoV-2 infection causes dysregulation of immune system. However, the unique signature of early immune responses remains elusive. We characterized the transcriptome of rhesus macaques and mice infected with SARS-CoV-2. Alarmin S100A8 was robustly induced by SARS-CoV-2 in animal models as well as in COVID-19 patients. Paquinimod, a specific inhibitor of S100A8/A9, could reduce inflammatory response and rescue the pneumonia with substantial reduction of viral titers in SASR-CoV-2 infected animals. Remarkably, Paquinimod treatment resulted in 100% survival of mice in a lethal model of mouse coronavirus (MHV) infection. A novel group of neutrophils that contributed to the uncontrolled inflammation and onset of COVID-19 were dramatically induced by coronavirus infections. Paquinimod treatment could reduce these neutrophils and regain antiviral responses, unveiling key roles of S100A8/A9 and noncanonical neutrophils in the pathogenesis of COVID-19, highlighting new opportunities for therapeutic intervention.Funding: This work was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (31570891;31872736), the National Key Research and Development Program of China (2016YFA0500302;2020YFA0707800), the National Key Research and Development Program (2020YFA0707500) and the Strategic Priority Research Program (XDB29010000). Xiangxi Wang was supported by Ten Thousand Talent Program and the NSFS Innovative Research Group (81921005). We thank National Mega projects of China for Major Infectious Diseases (2017ZX10304402), CAMS initiative for Innovative Medicine of China (2016-12M-2-006) and The National Natural Science Foundation of China (82041008) for the support on the animal model study. Conflict of Interest: The authors have no conflicts of interest to declare.Ethical Approval: All experiments with live SARS-CoV-2 viruses were carried out in the enhanced biosafety level 3 (P3+) facilities in the Institute of Laboratory Animal Science, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences (CAMS) approved by the National Health Commission of the People’s Republic of China. All animals care and use were in accordance with the Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals of the Chinese Association for Laboratory Animal Science. All procedures of animal handling were approved by the Animal Care Committee of Peking University Health Science Center.

8.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-307708

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 carries the largest single-stranded RNA genome and is the causal pathogen of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. How the SARS-CoV-2 RNA genome is folded in the virion remains unknown. To fill the knowledge gap and facilitate structure-based drug development, we developed a virion RNA in situ conformation sequencing technology, named vRIC-seq, for probing viral RNA genome structure unbiasedly. Using vRIC-seq data, we reconstructed the tertiary structure of the SARS-CoV-2 genome and revealed a surprisingly "unentangled globule" conformation. We uncovered many long-range duplexes and higher-order junctions, both of which were under purifying selections and contributed to the sequential package of the SARS-CoV-2 genome. Unexpectedly, the D614G and the other two accompanying mutations might remodel duplexes into more stable forms. Lastly, the structure-guided design of potent small interfering RNAs could obliterate the SARS-CoV-2 in Vero cells. Overall, our work provides a framework for studying the genome structure, function, and dynamics of emerging deadly RNA viruses.

9.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-325436

ABSTRACT

The spike protein (S) of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) mediates membrane fusion to allow entry of viral genome into host cell. To understand its detailed entry mechanism and develop specific entry inhibitor, the in situ structural information of SARS-CoV-2 spikes in different states are urgently important. Here, by using the cryo-electron microscopic tomograms, we observed spikes of inactivated SARS-CoV-2 virions in both pre-fusion and post-fusion states and solved the nanometer resolution structure of in situ post-fusion spike. With a more complete model compared to previous reports, the relative spatial position between fusion peptide and transmembrane domain was discovered. Novel oligomerizations of spikes on viral membrane were observed, likely suggesting a new mechanism of fusion pore formation.

10.
Nature ; 603(7903): 919-925, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1655591

ABSTRACT

Omicron (B.1.1.529), the most heavily mutated SARS-CoV-2 variant so far, is highly resistant to neutralizing antibodies, raising concerns about the effectiveness of antibody therapies and vaccines1,2. Here we examined whether sera from individuals who received two or three doses of inactivated SARS-CoV-2 vaccine could neutralize authentic Omicron. The seroconversion rates of neutralizing antibodies were 3.3% (2 out of 60) and 95% (57 out of 60) for individuals who had received 2 and 3 doses of vaccine, respectively. For recipients of three vaccine doses, the geometric mean neutralization antibody titre for Omicron was 16.5-fold lower than for the ancestral virus (254). We isolated 323 human monoclonal antibodies derived from memory B cells in triple vaccinees, half of which recognized the receptor-binding domain, and showed that a subset (24 out of 163) potently neutralized all SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern, including Omicron. Therapeutic treatments with representative broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies were highly protective against infection of mice with SARS-CoV-2 Beta (B.1.351) and Omicron. Atomic structures of the Omicron spike protein in complex with three classes of antibodies that were active against all five variants of concern defined the binding and neutralizing determinants and revealed a key antibody escape site, G446S, that confers greater resistance to a class of antibodies that bind on the right shoulder of the receptor-binding domain by altering local conformation at the binding interface. Our results rationalize the use of three-dose immunization regimens and suggest that the fundamental epitopes revealed by these broadly ultrapotent antibodies are rational targets for a universal sarbecovirus vaccine.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Animals , Antibodies, Monoclonal/immunology , Antibodies, Monoclonal/isolation & purification , Antibodies, Monoclonal/therapeutic use , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Neutralizing/isolation & purification , Antibodies, Neutralizing/therapeutic use , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/isolation & purification , Antibodies, Viral/therapeutic use , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/virology , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , Disease Models, Animal , Humans , Mice , Neutralization Tests , SARS-CoV-2/classification , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology
11.
Cell ; 185(5): 860-871.e13, 2022 03 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1650841

ABSTRACT

The SARS-CoV-2 Omicron variant with increased fitness is spreading rapidly worldwide. Analysis of cryo-EM structures of the spike (S) from Omicron reveals amino acid substitutions forging interactions that stably maintain an active conformation for receptor recognition. The relatively more compact domain organization confers improved stability and enhances attachment but compromises the efficiency of the viral fusion step. Alterations in local conformation, charge, and hydrophobic microenvironments underpin the modulation of the epitopes such that they are not recognized by most NTD- and RBD-antibodies, facilitating viral immune escape. Structure of the Omicron S bound with human ACE2, together with the analysis of sequence conservation in ACE2 binding region of 25 sarbecovirus members, as well as heatmaps of the immunogenic sites and their corresponding mutational frequencies, sheds light on conserved and structurally restrained regions that can be used for the development of broad-spectrum vaccines and therapeutics.


Subject(s)
Immune Evasion/physiology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/chemistry , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Binding Sites , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Cryoelectron Microscopy , Humans , Mutagenesis, Site-Directed , Neutralization Tests , Protein Binding , Protein Domains/immunology , Protein Structure, Quaternary , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Surface Plasmon Resonance , Virus Attachment
12.
Nature ; 602(7898): 657-663, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1616990

ABSTRACT

The SARS-CoV-2 B.1.1.529 (Omicron) variant contains 15 mutations of the receptor-binding domain (RBD). How Omicron evades RBD-targeted neutralizing antibodies requires immediate investigation. Here we use high-throughput yeast display screening1,2 to determine the profiles of RBD escaping mutations for 247 human anti-RBD neutralizing antibodies and show that the neutralizing antibodies can be classified by unsupervised clustering into six epitope groups (A-F)-a grouping that is highly concordant with knowledge-based structural classifications3-5. Various single mutations of Omicron can impair neutralizing antibodies of different epitope groups. Specifically, neutralizing antibodies in groups A-D, the epitopes of which overlap with the ACE2-binding motif, are largely escaped by K417N, G446S, E484A and Q493R. Antibodies in group E (for example, S309)6 and group F (for example, CR3022)7, which often exhibit broad sarbecovirus neutralizing activity, are less affected by Omicron, but a subset of neutralizing antibodies are still escaped by G339D, N440K and S371L. Furthermore, Omicron pseudovirus neutralization showed that neutralizing antibodies that sustained single mutations could also be escaped, owing to multiple synergetic mutations on their epitopes. In total, over 85% of the tested neutralizing antibodies were escaped by Omicron. With regard to neutralizing-antibody-based drugs, the neutralization potency of LY-CoV016, LY-CoV555, REGN10933, REGN10987, AZD1061, AZD8895 and BRII-196 was greatly undermined by Omicron, whereas VIR-7831 and DXP-604 still functioned at a reduced efficacy. Together, our data suggest that infection with Omicron would result in considerable humoral immune evasion, and that neutralizing antibodies targeting the sarbecovirus conserved region will remain most effective. Our results inform the development of antibody-based drugs and vaccines against Omicron and future variants.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Immune Evasion/immunology , Neutralization Tests , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Antibodies, Monoclonal/immunology , Antibodies, Monoclonal/therapeutic use , Antibodies, Neutralizing/classification , Antibodies, Viral/classification , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , Cells, Cultured , Convalescence , Epitopes, B-Lymphocyte/chemistry , Epitopes, B-Lymphocyte/immunology , Humans , Immune Sera/immunology , Models, Molecular , Mutation , SARS-CoV-2/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism
13.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-296579

ABSTRACT

The SARS-CoV-2 B.1.1.529 variant (Omicron) contains 15 mutations on the receptor-binding domain (RBD). How Omicron would evade RBD neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) and humoral immunity requires immediate investigation. Here, we used high-throughput yeast display screening 1,2 to determine the RBD escaping mutation profiles for 247 human anti-RBD NAbs identified from SARS-CoV/SARS-CoV-2 convalescents and vaccinees. Based on the results, NAbs could be unsupervised clustered into six epitope groups (A-F), which is highly concordant with knowledge-based structural classifications 3–5 . Strikingly, various single mutations of Omicron could impair NAbs of different epitope groups. Specifically, NAbs in Group A-D, whose epitope overlaps with ACE2-binding motif, are largely escaped by K417N, N440K, G446S, E484A, Q493K, and G496S. Group E (S309 site) 6 and F (CR3022 site) 7 NAbs, which often exhibit broad sarbecovirus neutralizing activity, are less affected by Omicron, but still, a subset of NAbs are escaped by G339D, S371L, and S375F. Furthermore, B.1.1.529 pseudovirus neutralization and RBD binding assay showed that single mutation tolerating NAbs could also be escaped due to multiple synergetic mutations on their epitopes. In total, over 85% of the tested NAbs are escaped by Omicron. Regarding NAb drugs, LY-CoV016/LY-CoV555 cocktail, REGN-CoV2 cocktail, AZD1061/AZD8895 cocktail, and BRII-196 were escaped by Omicron, while VIR7831 and DXP-604 still function at reduced efficacy. Together, data suggest Omicron could cause significant humoral immune evasion, while NAbs targeting the sarbecovirus conserved region remain most effective. Our results offer instructions for developing NAb drugs and vaccines against Omicron and future variants.

14.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 118(48)2021 11 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1517667

ABSTRACT

The spike protein of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) mediates membrane fusion to allow entry of the viral genome into host cells. To understand its detailed entry mechanism and develop a specific entry inhibitor, in situ structural information on the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein in different states is urgent. Here, by using cryo-electron tomography, we observed both prefusion and postfusion spikes in ß-propiolactone-inactivated SARS-CoV-2 virions and solved the in situ structure of the postfusion spike at nanometer resolution. Compared to previous reports, the six-helix bundle fusion core, the glycosylation sites, and the location of the transmembrane domain were clearly resolved. We observed oligomerization patterns of the spikes on the viral membrane, likely suggesting a mechanism of fusion pore formation.


Subject(s)
SARS-CoV-2/ultrastructure , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Amino Acid Motifs , Animals , Chlorocebus aethiops , Cryoelectron Microscopy , Electron Microscope Tomography , Glycosylation , Protein Domains , Protein Multimerization , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Vero Cells
15.
Nat Commun ; 12(1): 5654, 2021 09 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1440471

ABSTRACT

There is an urgent need for animal models to study SARS-CoV-2 pathogenicity. Here, we generate and characterize a novel mouse-adapted SARS-CoV-2 strain, MASCp36, that causes severe respiratory symptoms, and mortality. Our model exhibits age- and gender-related mortality akin to severe COVID-19. Deep sequencing identified three amino acid substitutions, N501Y, Q493H, and K417N, at the receptor binding domain (RBD) of MASCp36, during in vivo passaging. All three RBD mutations significantly enhance binding affinity to its endogenous receptor, ACE2. Cryo-electron microscopy analysis of human ACE2 (hACE2), or mouse ACE2 (mACE2), in complex with the RBD of MASCp36, at 3.1 to 3.7 Å resolution, reveals the molecular basis for the receptor-binding switch. N501Y and Q493H enhance the binding affinity to hACE2, whereas triple mutations at N501Y/Q493H/K417N decrease affinity and reduce infectivity of MASCp36. Our study provides a platform for studying SARS-CoV-2 pathogenesis, and unveils the molecular mechanism for its rapid adaptation and evolution.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Amino Acid Substitution , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Animals , Binding Sites/genetics , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/virology , Disease Models, Animal , Female , Humans , Male , Mice , Protein Binding/genetics , Protein Domains/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Severity of Illness Index , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics
20.
Cell Res ; 31(1): 25-36, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1387275

ABSTRACT

Structural principles underlying the composition and synergistic mechanisms of protective monoclonal antibody cocktails are poorly defined. Here, we exploited antibody cooperativity to develop a therapeutic antibody cocktail against SARS-CoV-2. On the basis of our previously identified humanized cross-neutralizing antibody H014, we systematically analyzed a fully human naive antibody library and rationally identified a potent neutralizing antibody partner, P17, which confers effective protection in animal model. Cryo-EM studies dissected the nature of the P17 epitope, which is SARS-CoV-2 specific and distinctly different from that of H014. High-resolution structure of the SARS-CoV-2 spike in complex with H014 and P17, together with functional investigations revealed that in a two-antibody cocktail, synergistic neutralization was achieved by S1 shielding and conformational locking, thereby blocking receptor attachment and viral membrane fusion, conferring high potency as well as robustness against viral mutation escape. Furthermore, cluster analysis identified a hypothetical 3rd antibody partner for further reinforcing the cocktail as pan-SARS-CoVs therapeutics.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19 , Epitopes/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Single-Chain Antibodies/immunology , Animals , Antibodies, Neutralizing/pharmacology , Antibodies, Viral/pharmacology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Chlorocebus aethiops , Disease Models, Animal , Humans , Single-Chain Antibodies/pharmacology , Vero Cells
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