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1.
Vaccine ; 40(9): 1208-1212, 2022 02 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1757896

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) has resulted in catastrophic damage worldwide. Accordingly, the development of powerful, safe, easily accessible vaccines with long-term effectiveness is understood as an urgently needed countermeasure against this ongoing pandemic. Guided by this strong promise of using AAVs, we here designed, optimized, and developed an AAV-based vaccines (including AAV-RBD(max), AAV-RBD(wt), AAV-2xRBD, and AAV-3xRBD) that elicit strong immune responses against the RBD domain of the SARS-CoV-2 S protein. These immunogenic responses have proven long-lived, with near peak levels for at least six months in mice. Notably, the sera immunized with AAV-3xRBD vaccine contains powerful neutralizing antibodies against the SARS-CoV-2 pseudovirus. Further evidence proven that potent specific antibodies could also be elicited in canines after vaccination with AAV-3xRBD vaccine.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Viral Vaccines , Animals , Antibodies, Neutralizing , Antibodies, Viral , COVID-19 Vaccines , Dogs , Humans , Mice , Mice, Inbred BALB C , SARS-CoV-2 , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Viral Vaccines/genetics
2.
Clin Infect Dis ; 2021 Aug 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1704207

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Follow-up study of Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) survivors has rarely been reported. We aimed to investigate longitudinal changes in the characteristics of COVID-19 survivors after discharge. METHODS AND FINDINGS: A total of 594 COVID-19 survivors discharged from Tongji Hospital in Wuhan from February 10 to April 30, 2020 were included and followed up until May 17, 2021. Laboratory and radiological findings, pulmonary function tests, electrocardiogram, symptoms and signs were analyzed. 257 (51.2%) patients had at least one symptom at 3 months post-discharge, which decreased to 169 (40.0%) and 138 (28.4%) at 6-month and 12-month visit respectively. During follow-up period, insomnia, chest tightness, and fatigue were the most prevalent symptoms. Most laboratory parameters returned to normal, whereas increased incidence of abnormal liver and renal function and cardiovascular injury was evidenced after discharge. Fibrous stripes (213; 42.4%), pleural thickening and adhesions (188; 37.5%) and enlarged lymph nodes (120; 23.9%) were the most common radiographical findings at 3 months post-discharge. The abnormalities of pulmonary function included obstructive, restrictive, and mixed, which were 5.5%, 4.0%, 0.9% at 6 months post, and 1.9%, 4.7%, 0.2% at 12 months. Electrocardiogram abnormalities occurred in 256 (51.0%) patients at 3 months post-discharge, including arrhythmia, ST-T change and conduction block, which increased to 258 (61.1%) cases at 6-month visit and were maintained at high frequency (242;49.8%) at 12-month visit. CONCLUSIONS: Physiological, laboratory, radiological or electrocardiogram abnormalities, particularly those related to renal, cardiovascular, liver functions are common in patients who recovered from COVID-19 up to 12months post-discharge.

3.
Signal Transduct Target Ther ; 7(1): 57, 2022 02 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1702971

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a highly transmissible disease caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) that poses a major threat to global public health. Although COVID-19 primarily affects the respiratory system, causing severe pneumonia and acute respiratory distress syndrome in severe cases, it can also result in multiple extrapulmonary complications. The pathogenesis of extrapulmonary damage in patients with COVID-19 is probably multifactorial, involving both the direct effects of SARS-CoV-2 and the indirect mechanisms associated with the host inflammatory response. Recognition of features and pathogenesis of extrapulmonary complications has clinical implications for identifying disease progression and designing therapeutic strategies. This review provides an overview of the extrapulmonary complications of COVID-19 from immunological and pathophysiologic perspectives and focuses on the pathogenesis and potential therapeutic targets for the management of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury/complications , COVID-19/complications , Cytokine Release Syndrome/complications , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/complications , Lymphopenia/complications , Myocarditis/complications , Pulmonary Embolism/complications , Acute Kidney Injury/drug therapy , Acute Kidney Injury/immunology , Acute Kidney Injury/virology , Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Clinical Trials as Topic , Cytokine Release Syndrome/drug therapy , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/virology , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/drug therapy , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/immunology , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/virology , Endothelial Cells/drug effects , Endothelial Cells/immunology , Endothelial Cells/virology , Humans , Immunity, Innate/drug effects , Immunologic Factors/therapeutic use , Lymphopenia/drug therapy , Lymphopenia/immunology , Lymphopenia/virology , Myocarditis/drug therapy , Myocarditis/immunology , Myocarditis/virology , Pulmonary Embolism/drug therapy , Pulmonary Embolism/immunology , Pulmonary Embolism/virology , Renin-Angiotensin System/drug effects , Renin-Angiotensin System/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/growth & development , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity
4.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-314876

ABSTRACT

Background: Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) in COVID-19 is associated with high mortality. Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSC) are potent immunomodulatory cells. The aim of this study was to determine safety and explore efficacy of Umbilical Cord (UC)-MSC infusions in COVID-19 ARDS.Methods: A double-blind, phase 1/2a, randomized, controlled trial was performed in subjects with ARDS secondary to COVID-19, at a single institution in Miami, Florida, USA. Randomization and stratification by ARDS severity was used to foster balance among groups. Participants received two intravenous infusions of 100x106 UC-MSC, or vehicle, at day 0 and 3. The primary endpoint was safety, defined by occurrence of pre-specified infusion associated adverse events, along with adverse events during 28 day follow-up. All subjects were analyzed under an intention to treat design. Exploratory efficacy endpoints included survival at 28 days and time to recovery.Findings: 24 subjects (12 per group) were recruited between April 25 and July 21 2020. At 28 days post last infusion, patient survival was 91% and 42% in the UC-MSC and Control groups, respectively (p=0.015). No serious adverse events (SAEs) were observed related to UC-MSC infusions. There was no observed difference in number of subjects experiencing infusion-associated adverse events. Treatment unrelated SAEs were reported in 2 and 8 patients in the UC-MSC and Control groups, respectively (p=0.04). UC-MSC treatment was associated with increased SAE-free survival (p=0.008) and decreased time to recovery (p=0.03) compared to controls.Interpretation: UC-MSC infusions in COVID-19 subjects with ARDS were safe and associated with fewer SAEs, compared to control. Further, exploratory efficacy analyses provide preliminary evidence of reduction in mortality and time to recovery. Notwithstanding sample size limitations of this trial, the observed findings strongly support further investigation in a larger trial designed to estimate and test for efficacy.Trial Registration: (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT04355728).Funding Statement: The trial was funded by the Barilla Group and Family, The Cure Alliance, the Fondazione Silvio Tronchetti Provera, the Simkins Family Foundation, the North America’s Building Trades Unions, and the Diabetes Research Institute Foundation. This publication was supported by the Clinical Translational Research Site Grants Number UL1TR000460 and UL1TR002736 from the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS).Declaration of Interests: The authors declare no competing interests.Ethics Approval Statement: Ethics Committee Approval by the regulatory and institutional review boards were obtained by the Western Institutional Review Board (WIRB) and UM Human Subject Research Office/Institutional Review Board, in accordance with local institutional requirements.

5.
J Am Chem Soc ; 144(4): 1498-1502, 2022 02 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1586041

ABSTRACT

Several applications in health diagnostics, food, safety, and environmental monitoring require rapid, simple, selective, and quantitatively accurate viral load monitoring. Here, we introduce the first label-free biosensing method that rapidly detects and quantifies intact virus in human saliva with single-virion resolution. Using pseudotype SARS-CoV-2 as a representative target, we immobilize aptamers with the ability to differentiate active from inactive virions on a photonic crystal, where the virions are captured through affinity with the spike protein displayed on the outer surface. Once captured, the intrinsic scattering of the virions is amplified and detected through interferometric imaging. Our approach analyzes the motion trajectory of each captured virion, enabling highly selective recognition against nontarget virions, while providing a limit of detection of 1 × 103 copies/mL at room temperature. The approach offers an alternative to enzymatic amplification assays for point-of-collection diagnostics.


Subject(s)
Aptamers, Nucleotide/chemistry , Biosensing Techniques/methods , DNA/chemistry , Immobilized Nucleic Acids/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Biosensing Techniques/instrumentation , Humans , Limit of Detection , Microscopy/methods , Optics and Photonics/instrumentation , Optics and Photonics/methods , SARS-CoV-2/chemistry , Saliva/virology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry
6.
Emerg Microbes Infect ; 10(1): 578-588, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1490460

ABSTRACT

Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) is the pathogen which causes tuberculosis (TB), a significant human public health threat. Co-infection of M. tuberculosis and the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), emergence of drug resistant M. tuberculosis, and failure to develop highly effective TB vaccines have limited control of the TB epidemic. Trained immunity is an enhanced innate immune response which functions independently of the adaptive/acquired immune system and responds non-specifically to reinfection with invading agents. Recently, several studies have found trained immunity has the capability to control and eliminate M. tuberculosis infection. Over the past decades, however, the consensus was adaptive immunity is the only protective mechanism by which hosts inhibit M. tuberculosis growth. Furthermore, autophagy plays an essential role in the development of trained immunity. Further investigation of trained immunity, M. tuberculosis infection, and the role of autophagy in this process provide new possibilities for vaccine development. In this review, we present the general characteristics of trained immunity and autophagy. We additionally summarize several examples where initiation of trained immunity contributes to the prevention of M. tuberculosis infection and propose future directions for research in this area.


Subject(s)
Autophagy , Immunity, Innate , Mycobacterium tuberculosis/immunology , Tuberculosis Vaccines/immunology , Tuberculosis/immunology , Tuberculosis/prevention & control , Adaptive Immunity , Animals , Humans , Immunologic Memory , Vaccination
7.
Clin Infect Dis ; 2021 Aug 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1356658

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Follow-up study of Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) survivors has rarely been reported. We aimed to investigate longitudinal changes in the characteristics of COVID-19 survivors after discharge. METHODS AND FINDINGS: A total of 594 COVID-19 survivors discharged from Tongji Hospital in Wuhan from February 10 to April 30, 2020 were included and followed up until May 17, 2021. Laboratory and radiological findings, pulmonary function tests, electrocardiogram, symptoms and signs were analyzed. 257 (51.2%) patients had at least one symptom at 3 months post-discharge, which decreased to 169 (40.0%) and 138 (28.4%) at 6-month and 12-month visit respectively. During follow-up period, insomnia, chest tightness, and fatigue were the most prevalent symptoms. Most laboratory parameters returned to normal, whereas increased incidence of abnormal liver and renal function and cardiovascular injury was evidenced after discharge. Fibrous stripes (213; 42.4%), pleural thickening and adhesions (188; 37.5%) and enlarged lymph nodes (120; 23.9%) were the most common radiographical findings at 3 months post-discharge. The abnormalities of pulmonary function included obstructive, restrictive, and mixed, which were 5.5%, 4.0%, 0.9% at 6 months post, and 1.9%, 4.7%, 0.2% at 12 months. Electrocardiogram abnormalities occurred in 256 (51.0%) patients at 3 months post-discharge, including arrhythmia, ST-T change and conduction block, which increased to 258 (61.1%) cases at 6-month visit and were maintained at high frequency (242;49.8%) at 12-month visit. CONCLUSIONS: Physiological, laboratory, radiological or electrocardiogram abnormalities, particularly those related to renal, cardiovascular, liver functions are common in patients who recovered from COVID-19 up to 12months post-discharge.

8.
Front Endocrinol (Lausanne) ; 12: 596518, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1156116

ABSTRACT

Clinical Trial Registration: www.ClinicalTrials.gov, identifier: NCT04365634. Context: Diabetes mellitus was associated with increased severity and mortality of disease in COVID-19 pneumonia. So far the effect of type 2 diabetes (T2DM) or hyperglycemia on the immune system among COVID-19 disease has remained unclear. Objective: We aim to explore the clinical and immunological features of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) among COVID-19 patients. Design and Methods: In this retrospective study, the clinical and immunological characteristics of 306 hospitalized confirmed COVID-19 patients (including 129 diabetic and 177 non-diabetic patients) were analyzed. The serum concentrations of laboratory parameters including cytokines and numbers of immune cells were measured and compared between diabetic and non-diabetic groups. Results: Compared with non-diabetic group, diabetic cases more frequently had lymphopenia and hyperglycemia, with higher levels of urea nitrogen, myoglobin, D-dimer and ferritin. Diabetic cases indicated the obviously elevated mortality and the higher levels of cytokines IL-2R, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, and TNF-α, as well as the distinctly reduced Th1/Th2 cytokines ratios compared with non-diabetic cases. The longitudinal assays showed that compared to that at week 1, the levels of IL-6 and IL-8 were significantly elevated at week 2 after admission in non-survivors of diabetic cases, whereas there were greatly reductions from week 1 to week 2 in survivors of diabetic cases. Compared with survival diabetic patients, non-survival diabetic cases displayed distinct higher serum concentrations of IL-2R, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, TNF-α, and lower Th1/Th2 cytokines ratios at week 2. Samples from a subset of participants were evaluated by flow cytometry for the immune cells. The counts of peripheral total T lymphocytes, CD4+ T cells, CD8+ T cells and NK cells were markedly lower in diabetic cases than in non-diabetic cases. The non-survivors showed the markedly declined counts of CD8+ T cells and NK cells than survivors. Conclusion: The elevated cytokines, imbalance of Th1/Th2 cytokines ratios and reduced of peripheral numbers of CD8+ T cells and NK cells might contribute to the pathogenic mechanisms of high mortality of COVID-19 patients with T2DM.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/immunology , Adult , Aged , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/pathology , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/pathology , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/mortality , China/epidemiology , Cytokines/analysis , Cytokines/blood , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/blood , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/complications , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/mortality , Female , Humans , Hyperglycemia/blood , Hyperglycemia/complications , Hyperglycemia/immunology , Hyperglycemia/mortality , Immune System/metabolism , Immune System/pathology , Killer Cells, Natural/pathology , Lymphocyte Count , Lymphopenia/blood , Lymphopenia/complications , Lymphopenia/immunology , Lymphopenia/mortality , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Th1 Cells/pathology , Th2 Cells/pathology
9.
Front Med ; 15(3): 486-494, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1122810

ABSTRACT

Tocilizumab has been reported to attenuate the "cytokine storm" in COVID-19 patients. We attempted to verify the effectiveness and safety of tocilizumab therapy in COVID-19 and identify patients most likely to benefit from this treatment. We conducted a randomized, controlled, open-label multicenter trial among COVID-19 patients. The patients were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to receive either tocilizumab in addition to standard care or standard care alone. The cure rate, changes of oxygen saturation and interference, and inflammation biomarkers were observed. Thirty-three patients were randomized to the tocilizumab group, and 32 patients to the control group. The cure rate in the tocilizumab group was higher than that in the control group, but the difference was not statistically significant (94.12% vs. 87.10%, rate difference 95% CI-7.19%-21.23%, P = 0.4133). The improvement in hypoxia for the tocilizumab group was higher from day 4 onward and statistically significant from day 12 (P = 0.0359). In moderate disease patients with bilateral pulmonary lesions, the hypoxia ameliorated earlier after tocilizumab treatment, and less patients (1/12, 8.33%) needed an increase of inhaled oxygen concentration compared with the controls (4/6, 66.67%; rate difference 95% CI-99.17% to-17.50%, P = 0.0217). No severe adverse events occurred. More mild temporary adverse events were recorded in tocilizumab recipients (20/34, 58.82%) than the controls (4/31, 12.90%). Tocilizumab can improve hypoxia without unacceptable side effect profile and significant influences on the time virus load becomes negative. For patients with bilateral pulmonary lesions and elevated IL-6 levels, tocilizumab could be recommended to improve outcome.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized , COVID-19/drug therapy , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome
10.
Front Pharmacol ; 11: 634266, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1110322

ABSTRACT

Background: Yindan Jiedu Granules (YDJDG) have been newly prescribed as a Chinese herbal formula. This study aimed to compare the efficacy of YDJDG and lopinavir-ritonavir in the treatment of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Methods: Overall, 131 patients with COVID-19 were included in this study. In addition to standard care, 60 of these patients received YDJDG (YDJDG group) and 71 received lopinavir-ritonavir (lopinavir-ritonavir group). Propensity score matching (PSM) was used to match the characteristics of individuals in the two groups, while the Kaplan-Meier method was used to compare the proportion recovery observed. Results: Cox analysis revealed that YDJDG and CD4 ≥ 660 cells/µL were independent predictive factors of proportion recovery. At baseline, disease types differed between the YDJDG and lopinavir-ritonavir treatment groups. Furthermore, no significant adverse effects or toxicities relevant to YDJDG were observed. The median recovery time was 21 days in the YDJDG group and 27 days in the lopinavir-ritonavir group. After PSM (1:1), 50 patient pairs, YDJDG vs. lopinavir-ritonavir, were analyzed. In the YDJDG group, the proportion of recovered patients was remarkably higher than that observed in the lopinavir-ritonavir group (p = 0.0013), especially for those presenting mild/moderate disease type and CD4 < 660 cells/µL. In the YDJDG group, the mean duration of fever and pulmonary exudative lesions was significantly shorter than that observed in the lopinavir-ritonavir group (p = 0.0180 and p = 0.0028, respectively). Conclusion: YDJDG reveals the potential to hasten the recovery period in COVID-19 patients with mild/moderate disease type or CD4 < 660 cells/µL by shortening the mean duration of fever and pulmonary exudative lesions.

11.
Stem Cells Transl Med ; 10(5): 660-673, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1008163

ABSTRACT

Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in COVID-19 is associated with high mortality. Mesenchymal stem cells are known to exert immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory effects and could yield beneficial effects in COVID-19 ARDS. The objective of this study was to determine safety and explore efficacy of umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cell (UC-MSC) infusions in subjects with COVID-19 ARDS. A double-blind, phase 1/2a, randomized, controlled trial was performed. Randomization and stratification by ARDS severity was used to foster balance among groups. All subjects were analyzed under intention to treat design. Twenty-four subjects were randomized 1:1 to either UC-MSC treatment (n = 12) or the control group (n = 12). Subjects in the UC-MSC treatment group received two intravenous infusions (at day 0 and 3) of 100 ± 20 × 106 UC-MSCs; controls received two infusions of vehicle solution. Both groups received best standard of care. Primary endpoint was safety (adverse events [AEs]) within 6 hours; cardiac arrest or death within 24 hours postinfusion). Secondary endpoints included patient survival at 31 days after the first infusion and time to recovery. No difference was observed between groups in infusion-associated AEs. No serious adverse events (SAEs) were observed related to UC-MSC infusions. UC-MSC infusions in COVID-19 ARDS were found to be safe. Inflammatory cytokines were significantly decreased in UC-MSC-treated subjects at day 6. Treatment was associated with significantly improved patient survival (91% vs 42%, P = .015), SAE-free survival (P = .008), and time to recovery (P = .03). UC-MSC infusions are safe and could be beneficial in treating subjects with COVID-19 ARDS.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/therapy , Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation/methods , Cytokines/blood , Double-Blind Method , Female , Humans , Male , Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation/adverse effects , Mesenchymal Stem Cells , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Severity of Illness Index , Treatment Outcome , Umbilical Cord/cytology
12.
Hepatol Int ; 14(5): 723-732, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-834069

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has rapidly become a major international public health concern. This study was designed to evaluate the clinical characteristics and risk factors of COVID-19-associated liver injury. METHODS: A fraction of 657 COVID-19 patients were retrospectively analyzed. Clinical and laboratory data were derived from electronic medical records and compared between patients with or without liver injury. Multivariate logistic regression method was used to analyze the risk factors for liver injury. RESULTS: Among 657 patients, 303 (46.1%) patients had liver injury with higher rate in severe/critically ill patients [148/257 (57.6%)] than those in moderate cases [155/400 (38.8%)]. The incidence of liver injury was much higher in male [192/303 (63.4%)] than female [111/303 (36.6%)], and in severe/critical patients [148/303 (48.8%)] with percutaneous oxygen saturation ≤ 93% [89/279 (31.9%)] or peak body temperature ≥ 38.5 °C [185/301 (61.5%)] on admission. Liver injury-related inflammations included increased white blood cells, neutrophils and decreased lymphocytes. More patients with liver injury than without had increased serum IL-2R, TNFα, ferritin, hsCRP, PCT, ESR, γ-GT, and LDH. Multivariate regression analysis revealed that increasing odds of liver injury were related to male, higher serum hsCRP (≥ 10 mg/L), and neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) (≥ 5). Moreover, more deceased patients (14/82 (17%)) had significantly elevated serum TBIL than discharged patients [25/532 (4.7%)]. CONCLUSION: Liver injury is a common complication in COVID-19 patients. The potential risk factors of liver injury include male, hsCRP and NLR score. A close monitor of liver function should be warned in COVID-19 patients, especially in severe/critical individuals.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Cytokines/blood , Hepatic Insufficiency , Leukocyte Count/methods , Liver Function Tests , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , COVID-19 , China/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Critical Illness/epidemiology , Critical Illness/therapy , Female , Hepatic Insufficiency/blood , Hepatic Insufficiency/epidemiology , Hepatic Insufficiency/virology , Humans , Incidence , Liver Function Tests/methods , Liver Function Tests/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Sex Factors
14.
Phytochem Rev ; : 1-24, 2020 Sep 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-801732

ABSTRACT

Naturally occurring phenanthroindolizidine and phenanthroquinolizidine alkaloids (PIAs and PQAs) are two small groups of herbal metabolites sharing a similar pentacyclic structure with a highly oxygenated phenanthrene moiety fused with a saturated or an unsaturated N-heterocycle (indolizidine/quinolizidine moieties). Natural PIAs and PQAs only could be obtained from finite plant families (such as Asclepiadaceae, Lauraceae and Urticaceae families, etc.). Up to date, more than one hundred natural PIAs, while only nine natural PQAs had been described. PIA and PQA analogues have been applied to the development of potent anticancer agents all along because of their excellent cytotoxic activity. However, in the last two decades, other great biological properties, such as anti-inflammatory and antiviral activities were revealed successively by different pharmacological assays. Especially because of their potent antiviral activity against coronavirus (TGEV, SARS CoV and MHV) and tobacco mosaic virus, PIA and PQA analogues have attracted much pharmaceutical attention again, some of them have been used to present interesting targets for total or semi synthesis, and structure-activity relationship (SAR) study for the development of antiviral agents. In this review, natural PIA and PQA analogues obtained in the last two decades with their herbal origins, key spectroscopic characteristics for structural identification, biological activity with possible SARs and application prospects were systematically summarized. We hope this paper can stimulate further investigations on PIA and PQA analogues as an important source for potential drug discovery.

15.
Chin. Trad. Herbal Drugs ; 9(51): 2334-2344, 20200512.
Article in Chinese | WHO COVID, ELSEVIER | ID: covidwho-682200

ABSTRACT

Objective: To analyze the molecular interaction network pathway of Shenmai Injection in the treatment of COVID-19 with coronary heart disease by using network pharmacology. Methods: Using the TCMSP and ETCM to retrieve the chemical constituents of Ginseng Radix et Rhizoma Rubra and Ophiopogonis Radix in Shenmai Injection. The target of the compound was predicted through the SwissTargetPrediction database. The target of COVID-19 with coronary heart disease was screened through the NCBI database and the GeneCards database, and the targets of compound and disease were mapped to obtain the target of the compound for treating the disease. FunRich software and DAVID database were used to perform GO function enrichment analysis and KEGG pathway enrichment analysis, and Excel software and Tableau software to draw bar charts and bubble charts for visualization. Finally, Cytoscape 3.7.1 software was used to build compound-target-pathway network. Glide was used to dock the components of Shenmai Injection with 3CL hydrolase (Mpro). Results: The results showed that ophiopogonin D', ophiopogonin D, ginsenoside Rg 2, methyl ophiopogonanone A, ophiogenin-3-O-α-L-rhamnopyranosyl (1→2)-β-D-glucopyranoside, ginsenoside Rb 2, ginsenoside R 0, ophiopogon A, sanchinoside Rd, ophiopogonanone E, and ginsenoside Re showed higher degrees in the analysis and stronger binding with 3CL hydrolase. Those compounds were the main effective components in the treatment of COVID-19 combined with coronary heart disease, involving 77 targets such as IL6, GAPDH, ALB, TNF, MAPK1, MAPK3, TP53, EGFR, CASP3, and CXCL8. KEGG pathway enrichment analysis revealed that there were 124 (P < 0.05) signaling pathways involving HIF-1 signaling pathway, TNF signaling pathway, sphingolipid signaling pathway, Toll-like receptor signaling pathway, neurotrophin signaling pathway, VEGF signaling pathway, apoptosis, Ras signaling pathway, PI3K-Akt signaling pathway, and prolactin signaling pathway. The results of molecular docking showed that the affinity between the 17 components of Shenmai Injection and the 3CL hydrolase of SARS-CoV-2 was less than -25 kJ/mol. Conclusion: Shenmai Injection can achieve simultaneous intervention of COVID-19 and coronary heart disease by inhibiting cytokine storms, maintaining cardiac function homeostasis, regulating immunity, and antivirals. It presents the network regulation mechanism of mutual influence and complex correlation. This study can provide a scientific basis for the treatment of Shenmai Injection in critically ill patients with COVID-19.

18.
J Transl Med ; 18(1): 206, 2020 05 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-324357

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Patients with critical illness due to infection with the 2019 coronavirus disease (COVID-19) show rapid disease progression to acute respiratory failure. The study aimed to screen the most useful predictive factor for critical illness caused by COVID-19. METHODS: The study prospectively involved 61 patients with COVID-19 infection as a derivation cohort, and 54 patients as a validation cohort. The predictive factor for critical illness was selected using LASSO regression analysis. A nomogram based on non-specific laboratory indicators was built to predict the probability of critical illness. RESULTS: The neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) was identified as an independent risk factor for critical illness in patients with COVID-19 infection. The NLR had an area under receiver operating characteristic of 0.849 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.707 to 0.991) in the derivation cohort and 0.867 (95% CI 0.747 to 0.944) in the validation cohort, the calibration curves fitted well, and the decision and clinical impact curves showed that the NLR had high standardized net benefit. In addition, the incidence of critical illness was 9.1% (1/11) for patients aged ≥ 50 and having an NLR < 3.13, and 50% (7/14) patients with age ≥ 50 and NLR ≥ 3.13 were predicted to develop critical illness. Based on the risk stratification of NLR according to age, this study has developed a COVID-19 pneumonia management process. CONCLUSIONS: We found that NLR is a predictive factor for early-stage prediction of patients infected with COVID-19 who are likely to develop critical illness. Patients aged ≥ 50 and having an NLR ≥ 3.13 are predicted to develop critical illness, and they should thus have rapid access to an intensive care unit if necessary.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Critical Illness , Lymphocytes/pathology , Neutrophils/pathology , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , COVID-19 , Child , Child, Preschool , Cohort Studies , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Disease Progression , Female , History, 21st Century , Humans , Infant , Leukocyte Count , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Prognosis , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Young Adult
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