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2.
Chin J Integr Med ; 2022 Jan 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1620332

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To summarize the measures and rules of Chinese medicine (CM) and provide reference for clinical application in the prevention and treatment of coronavirus disease (COVID-19). METHODS: The data source was from CM COVID-19 prevention and treatment programs on government websites and official media websites of the different provinces and cities. The search lasted from December 8, 2019 to March 10, 2020. Main variables were medication frequency and combinations of medicines. Cluster analysis and complex network analysis were used by prevention and treatment stage and by area. RESULTS: Among 27 CM diagnosis and treatment plans, 203 therapeutic prescriptions were enrolled, of which the top 4 herbs were: Radix glycyrrhizae, Semen armeniacae amarum, Herba ephedrae, and Herba agastachis, respectively. The core combinations were Herba ephedrae and Semen armeniacae amarum. Forty-eight preventive formulae were identified. Ten herbs, including Radix Astragali seu hedysari, Radix glycyrrhizae, Radix saposhnikoviae, Flos lonicerae, etc. were most frequently used. The core prescription of CM compatibility was Radix astragali seu hedysari, Radix glycyrrhizae, and Radix saposhnikoviae, which is the main component of Yu Ping Feng San. There were 45 prevention and treatment prescriptions in East China; the most used CM was Radix glycyrrhizae, Herba agastachis, Pericarpium citri reticulatae, and Gypsum fibrosum. Fifty prescriptions were identified in North China. According to CM analyses, Herba agastachis, Semen armeniacae amarum, Herba ephedrae, and Poria were most frequently used. CONCLUSIONS: CM for COVID-19 prevention mainly focuses on improving human immunity; for treatment, prescription focuses on clearing the lungs and removing dampness. Prescriptions vary with regions, perhaps due to climatic and environmental differences, which help clinicians to quickly make CM plans and treat patients according to clinical status, further minimizing resource wastage.

3.
AIDS Behav ; 2022 Jan 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1611424

ABSTRACT

People with HIV (PWH) are at risk for adverse mental health outcomes, which could be elevated during the COVID-19 pandemic. This study describes reasons for changes in mental health among PWH during the pandemic. Data come from closed- and open-ended questions about mental health changes from a follow-up to a cohort study on PWH in Florida during part of the COVID-19 pandemic (May 2020-March 2021). Qualitative data were analyzed using thematic analysis. Among the total sample of 227 PWH (mean age 50.0, 49.7% men, 69.2% Black/African American, 14.1% Hispanic/Latino), 30.4% reported worsened mental health, 8.4% reported improved mental health, and 61.2% reported no change. The primary reasons for worsened mental health were concerns about COVID-19, social isolation, and anxiety/stress; reasons for improved mental health included increased focus on individual wellness. Nearly one-third of the sample experienced worsened mental health. These results provide support for increased mental health assessments in HIV treatment settings.

4.
J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr ; 2021 Dec 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1599136

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic and its associated socio-economic disruptions has disproportionally affected marginalized populations including people living with HIV (PLHIV). Little is known about how the pandemic has impacted populations experiencing multiple forms of stigma, discrimination and violence such as female sex workers (FSW) living with HIV. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional survey between August and December 2020 among 187 FSW living with HIV in the Dominican Republic (DR) to examine the impact of COVID-19. Using multivariable logistic regression, we examined associations between COVID-19-related financial concerns, mental health, substance use and partner abuse on engagement in HIV care and ART adherence. We conducted mediation analysis to assess whether mental health challenges mediated the impact of partner abuse or substance use on HIV outcomes. RESULTS: Most participants reported no income (72%) or a substantial decline in income (25%) since the COVID-19 pandemic. Approximately one third (34%) reported COVID-19 had an impact on their HIV care and treatment. Greater COVID-19 financial concerns (aOR=1.14, 95% CI: 1.02-1.27), mental health challenges (aOR=1.38, 95% CI: 1.06-1.79) and partner emotional abuse (aOR=2.62, 95% CI: 1.01-6.79) were associated with higher odds of negatively impacted HIV care, respectively. The relationship between increased emotional partner abuse and negatively impacted HIV care was mediated by greater COVID-19-related mental health challenges. CONCLUSION: FSW living with HIV in the DR have been significantly impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic. Targeted interventions that address structural (financial security, partner abuse) and psychosocial (mental health) factors are needed to sustain HIV outcomes and well-being.

5.
World J Clin Cases ; 9(35): 11050-11055, 2021 Dec 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1579732

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Colchicine has been widely used as an anti-gout medication over the past decades. However, it is less commonly used due to its narrow therapeutic range, meaning that its lethal dose is close to its therapeutic dose. The lethal dose of colchicine is considered to be 0.8 mg/kg. As chronic colchicine poisoning has multiple manifestations, it poses a challenge in the clinician's differential diagnosis. Historically, the drug was important in treating gout; however, clinical studies are currently underway regarding the use of colchicine in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 as well as its use in coronary artery disease, making this drug more important in clinical practice. CASE SUMMARY: A 61-year-old male with a history of gout and chronic colchicine intake was admitted to our Emergency Department due to numbness and weakness of the lower limbs. The patient reported a history of colchicine intake for 23 years. After thorough examination, he was diagnosed with colchicine poisoning, manifesting as neuromyopathy, multiple gastric ulcers and myelosuppression. We advised him to stop taking colchicine and drinking alcohol. We also provided a prescription of lansoprazole and mecobalamin, and then asked him to return to the clinic for re-examination. The patient was followed up for 3-mo during which time his gout symptoms were controlled to the point where he was asymptomatic. CONCLUSION: Colchicine overdose can mimic the clinical manifestations of several conditions. Physicians easily pay attention to the disease while ignoring the cause of the disease. Thus, the patient's medication history should never be ignored.

6.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(1)2021 12 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1576991

ABSTRACT

This study examined pre-pandemic (2017-early March 2020) to early-pandemic (Spring 2020) changes in moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA), light PA (LPA), and sedentary behavior/sleep (SS), by weekday/weekend, and age (preschool, elementary, middle school). We re-enrolled children from two pre-pandemic obesity prevention trials and examined differences in accelerometer-measured PA from pre-pandemic to early-pandemic across age groups using linear mixed models. Children (n = 75) were 51% multiple race/ethnicities, 29% preschool, 28% elementary, 43% middle school, 65% suburban, 21% rural, and 13% urban. Pre-pandemic to early-pandemic changes in weekday MVPA (p = 0.006), LPA (p = 0.018), and SS (p = 0.003) differed by age. On weekdays, middle schoolers' MVPA decreased 15.36 min/day (p = 0.002) and SS increased 94.36 min/day (p < 0.001) with non-significant changes among preschoolers and elementary schoolers. Compared to elementary schoolers, middle schoolers' changes in weekday MVPA (b = -16.34, p = 0.036) and SS (b = 63.28, p = 0.039) significantly differed. Declines in weekday MVPA and increases in SS among middle schoolers suggest that, compared with younger children, middle schoolers are dependent on school and recreational facilities for PA, and in their absence engage in more sedentary activities and sleep.


Subject(s)
Accelerometry , Pandemics , Child , Child, Preschool , Exercise , Humans , Policy , Sleep
7.
J Affect Disord ; 299: 326-334, 2022 02 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1587428

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: When COVID-19 emerged in China in late 2019, most citizens were home-quarantined to prevent the spread of the SARS-CoV-2 virus. Extended periods of isolation have detrimental effects on an individual's mental health. Therefore, the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic should include assessment of psychological distress and its known risk factors, including coping style and emotional regulation. METHODS: This cross-sectional study surveyed 6,027 Chinese university students recruited from May 25, 2020 to June 10, 2020. In addition to sociodemographic information, participant data were collected using online versions of the 10-item Kessler Psychological Distress Scale (K10), Simplified Coping Style Questionnaire (SCSQ), and Emotion Regulation Questionnaire (ERQ). RESULTS: The incidence of psychological distress was found to be 35.34%. Negative coping style and expressing panic about COVID-19 on social media were the most important predictors of psychological distress. In addition, being male, being a "left-behind child" or having a monthly household income lower than 5000 CNY or higher than 20,000 CNY were associated with higher psychological distress. CONCLUSION: The psychological consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic could be serious. Psychological interventions that reduce nervousness and negative coping style need to be made available to home-quarantined university students, especially those who are male, are "left-behind", have a monthly household income lower than 5000 CNY or higher than 20,000 CNY, or express panic on social media.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Emotional Regulation , Psychological Distress , Adaptation, Psychological , Child , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
8.
Front Public Health ; 9: 645971, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1574274

ABSTRACT

This study aimed to review the consequences of increased online learning, which was precipitated by the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), on visual function, as well as the methods for preventing the associated visual impairment. The recent finding implies that a higher incidence of myopia may be observed during the pandemic than that before. The myopia prevalence was 59.35% in COVID-19, which was higher than that in the normal period. COVID-19-related influence of developing myopia among students should be addressed and under control. Online learning precipitated by COVID-19 is likely to increase the global burden of visual function impairment. This review highlighted useful measures to prevent online learning-related visual function impairments, including the following: (1) desktop illumination of no >300 lx, online learning time for primary, and middle-school students of no more than 20-30 min per session; (2) daily video time for preschool children not exceeding 1 h, and for school-age children and adolescents not exceeding 2 h; (3) after every 30-40 min of online learning, moving eyes away from the screen or closed for 10 min; (4) engaging in outdoor activities for ≥ 2 h a day; (5) suitable screen and learning environment settings and correct postures for reading and writing; (6) sufficient sleep and proper nutrition. Preventing online learning-related visual impairment during and after this unprecedented pandemic will facilitate future ophthalmic practice.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance , Adolescent , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Students
9.
Subst Use Misuse ; : 1-6, 2021 Dec 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1565847

ABSTRACT

Significance: Findings regarding changes in substance use since COVID-19 have been mixed, potentially due to differences in methods used to assess change. Thus, we compared changes in substance use per retrospective self-report at one time-point (March-May 2020) versus prospective, longitudinal self-report across 2 time-points (Sept-Dec 2019; March-May 2020), and identified predictors of discordance. Methods: We analyzed data from a longitudinal study of 1,082 young adults from 6 metropolitan areas. Across cigarettes, e-cigarettes, marijuana, and alcohol, participants were categorized as Increasers (increased based on both methods), Decreasers/Stable (decreased/same per both methods), Over-reporters (decreased/same per longitudinal data/increased via retrospective report), or Under-reporters (increased per longitudinal data/decreased/same via retrospective report). We identified predictors (e.g., sociodemographics, pre-pandemic substance use levels) of Under-reporting. Results: In this sample (Mage=24.77; 45.7% male, 32.1% sexual minority, 4.0% Black, 12.4% Asian, 12.6% Hispanic), longitudinal data indicated that the proportions of cigarette, e-cigarette, marijuana, and alcohol users who increased their use were 43.3%, 41.7%, 52.6%, and 55.6%, respectively. Examining concordance/discordance groups, Under-reporters accounted for between 17.7% (alcohol) and 26.8% (e-cigarette) of users; over-reporters comprised among the smallest proportions of each group (17.4% for alcohol to 22.2% for marijuana). Multivariable regression indicated that predictors of Under-reporting were less pre-pandemic use across substances; being older for e-cigarettes; and being older, male, and Asian for alcohol. Conclusions: Findings highlight methodological variability as a potential reason for mixed findings regarding pandemic-related substance use change and underscore the need for rigorously designed research to accurately assess the population impact of COVID-19 and other historical events.

10.
Journal of Contingencies and Crisis Management ; 2021.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1564980

ABSTRACT

During COVID‐19, misinformation on social media has affected people's adoption of appropriate prevention behaviors. Although an array of approaches have been proposed to suppress misinformation, few have investigated the role of disseminating factual information during crises. None has examined its effect on suppressing misinformation quantitatively using longitudinal social media data. Therefore, this study investigates the temporal correlations between factual information and misinformation, and intends to answer whether previously predominant factual information can suppress misinformation. It focuses on two prevention measures, that is, wearing masks and social distancing, using tweets collected from April 3 to June 30, 2020, in the United States. We trained support vector machine classifiers to retrieve relevant tweets and classify tweets containing factual information and misinformation for each topic concerning the prevention measures’ effects. Based on cross‐correlation analyses of factual and misinformation time series for both topics, we find that the previously predominant factual information leads the decrease of misinformation (i.e., suppression) with a time lag. The research findings provide empirical understandings of dynamic relations between misinformation and factual information in complex online environments and suggest practical strategies for future misinformation management during crises and emergencies.

11.
International Journal of Hospitality Management ; 101:103126, 2022.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-1559570

ABSTRACT

Given that the polluted environment affects human health, Nature-Based Solutions (NBS) is becoming an emerging issue in the hospitality and tourism industry. This research is designed in order to explore the influence of NBSs on Green Brand Evangelism (GBE) through mental health, emotional well-being, Green Brand (GB) attitude, and Green Brand Loyalty (GBL) in the hotel industry by considering the moderating effect of price fairness. Our theoretical model was built based on the Stimulus-Organism-Response (S-O-R) theory, which successfully embraces the NBS framework, GBL, and GBE. Our findings based on an online survey reveal that NBS as a second-order construct, which embraces the four first-order elements, significantly improves guests' perception of mental health and emotional well-being. The direct and indirect effects of mental health, emotional well-being, GB attitude, and GBL also uncovered and significantly impacted GBE. The hypotheses were generally supported. Furthermore, the moderating impact of price fairness was found.

12.
J Ophthalmol ; 2021: 2678706, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1559286

ABSTRACT

Background: We aimed to investigate the symptoms of the dry eye disease (DED) of hospitalized patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Methods: This cross-sectional, observational study analysis included 91 hospitalized patients with confirmed COVID-19 in Wuhan, China. The Ocular Surface Disease Index (OSDI) and the five-item Dry Eye Questionnaire (DEQ-5) were used to assess the severity of DED symptoms in the patients, and the analysis of variance was used to determine the factors associated with DED. Results: A total of 42 patients consented to complete the investigation (response rate 46.15%). There were 26 (61.90%) patients who were diagnosed with DED symptoms by OSDI, and there were 28 (66.67%) patients with DED symptoms who were diagnosed by DEQ-5 score. For the biochemical tests, the patients with DED symptoms had lower aspartate aminotransferase (AST) levels compared to those with no DED symptoms (20.86 vs. 42.14, p=0.04). Further analysis showed that a previous history of cardiac or stroke disease (p=0.02) and typical symptoms of muscle soreness (p=0.03) were significantly different among the four DED symptoms groups on the basis of OSDI scores. The contributing factors of OSDI were mainly focused on visual function and environmental triggers. Conclusion: The incidence of DED symptoms is higher in hospitalized patients with COVID-19. The serum AST levels, history of cardiac or stroke disease, and the typical symptoms of muscle soreness may be the main impact factors on DED symptoms. We also need to pay more attention to the visual function and environmental triggers of hospitalized patients with COVID-19.

13.
Preprint in English | [Unspecified Source] | ID: ppcovidwho-292769

ABSTRACT

Background Several parameters driving the transmission of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) remain unclear, including age-specific differences in infectivity and susceptibility, and the contribution of inapparent infections to transmission. Robust estimates of key time-to-event distributions remain scarce as well. Methods We collected individual records for 1,178 SARS-CoV-2 infected individuals and their 15,648 contacts identified by contact tracing and monitoring over the period from January 13 to April 02, 2020 in Hunan Province, China. We provide descriptive statistics of the characteristics of cases and their close contacts;we fitted distributions to time-to-key-events distributions and infectiousness profile over time;and we used generalized linear mixed model to estimate risk factors for susceptibility and transmissibility of SARS-CoV-2. Results We estimated the mean serial interval at 5.5 days (95%CI -5.0, 19.9) and the mean generation time at 5.5 days (95%CI 1.7, 11.6). The infectiousness was estimated to peak 1.8 days before symptom onset, with 95% of transmission events occurring between 7.6 days before and 7.3 days after the date of symptom onset. The proportion of pre-symptomatic transmission was estimated to be 62.5%. We estimated that at least 3.5% of cases were generated asymptomatic individuals. SARS-CoV-2 transmissibility was not significantly different between working-age adults (15-59 years old) and other age groups (0-14 years old: p-value=0.16;60 years and over: p-value=0.33), whilst susceptibility to SARS-CoV-2 infection was estimated to increase with age (p-value=0.03). In addition, transmission risk was higher for household contacts (p-value<0.001), decreased for higher generations within a cluster (second generation: odds ratio=0.13, p-value<0.001;generations 3-4: odds ratio=0.05, p-value<0.001, relative to generation 1), and decreased for infectors with a larger number of contacts (p-value=0.04). Interpretation Our findings warn of the possible relevant contribution of children to SARS-CoV-2 transmission. When lockdown interventions are in place, we found that odds of transmission are highest in the household setting but, with the relaxation of interventions, other settings (including schools) could bear a higher risk of transmission. Moreover, the estimated relevant fraction of pre-symptomatic and asymptomatic transmission highlight the importance of large-scale testing, contact tracing activities, and the use of personnel protective equipment during the COVID-19 pandemic. Key words: transmissibility, risk factors, contact tracing, coronavirus.

14.
Journal of Contingencies and Crisis Management ; n/a(n/a), 2021.
Article in English | Wiley | ID: covidwho-1522625

ABSTRACT

Abstract During COVID-19, misinformation on social media has affected people's adoption of appropriate prevention behaviors. Although an array of approaches have been proposed to suppress misinformation, few have investigated the role of disseminating factual information during crises. None has examined its effect on suppressing misinformation quantitatively using longitudinal social media data. Therefore, this study investigates the temporal correlations between factual information and misinformation, and intends to answer whether previously predominant factual information can suppress misinformation. It focuses on two prevention measures, that is, wearing masks and social distancing, using tweets collected from April 3 to June 30, 2020, in the United States. We trained support vector machine classifiers to retrieve relevant tweets and classify tweets containing factual information and misinformation for each topic concerning the prevention measures? effects. Based on cross-correlation analyses of factual and misinformation time series for both topics, we find that the previously predominant factual information leads the decrease of misinformation (i.e., suppression) with a time lag. The research findings provide empirical understandings of dynamic relations between misinformation and factual information in complex online environments and suggest practical strategies for future misinformation management during crises and emergencies.

16.
PLoS One ; 16(11): e0259703, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1506037

ABSTRACT

Two mRNA vaccines (BNT162b2 and mRNA-1273) against severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) are globally authorized as a two-dose regimen. Understanding the magnitude and duration of protective immune responses is vital to curbing the pandemic. We enrolled 461 high-risk health services workers at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) and first responders in the Los Angeles County Fire Department (LACoFD) to assess the humoral responses in previously infected (PI) and infection naïve (NPI) individuals to mRNA-based vaccines (BNT162b2/Pfizer- BioNTech or mRNA-1273/Moderna). A chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay was used to detect antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 Spike in vaccinees prior to (n = 21) and following each vaccine dose (n = 246 following dose 1 and n = 315 following dose 2), and at days 31-60 (n = 110) and 61-90 (n = 190) following completion of the 2-dose series. Both vaccines induced robust antibody responses in all immunocompetent individuals. Previously infected individuals achieved higher median peak titers (p = 0.002) and had a slower rate of decay (p = 0.047) than infection-naïve individuals. mRNA-1273 vaccinated infection-naïve individuals demonstrated modestly higher titers following each dose (p = 0.005 and p = 0.029, respectively) and slower rates of antibody decay (p = 0.003) than those who received BNT162b2. A subset of previously infected individuals (25%) required both doses in order to reach peak antibody titers. The biologic significance of the differences between previously infected individuals and between the mRNA-1273 and BNT162b2 vaccines remains uncertain, but may have important implications for booster strategies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Immunity, Humoral , SARS-CoV-2 , Academic Medical Centers , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Antibody Formation , California/epidemiology , Emergency Medical Services , Emergency Responders , Health Personnel , Humans , Immunoassay , RNA, Messenger/metabolism , Universities
17.
Parasit Vectors ; 14(1): 248, 2021 May 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1506030

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Swine coccidiosis, a protozoan disease caused by coccidia, can result in diarrhoea and weight loss in piglets and even economic losses in the pig industry. Here, we report the first systematic review and meta-analysis of the prevalence of coccidia (including Eimeria spp. and Cystoisospora suis) in pigs in China. METHODS: Five databases (PubMed, ScienceDirect, Chinese Web of Knowledge, Wanfang, and Chongqing VIP) were searched and 50 studies (46,926 domestic pigs, 22 provinces) ultimately identified pertaining to the prevalence of coccidia infection from 1980 to 2019. We incorporated the effect size using the random-effects model in the "meta" package in R software and conducted univariate and multivariate meta-regression analyses using a mixed-effects model. RESULTS: The pooled prevalence rate of coccidia in pigs was 21.9%, including the C. suis infection rate of 9.1%. The highest prevalence of coccidia (39.6%) was found in northwest China, and this region also presented the lowest prevalence of C. suis (4.7%). In the subgroup analysis based on sampling year, the highest prevalence of coccidia was detected in 2001 or earlier (32.6%), whereas the lowest rate was found in 2012 or later (14.3%). An opposite trend was observed for C. suis (5.5% in 2000 or earlier vs 14.4% in 2000 or later). The prevalence of coccidia in extensive farming systems (29.5%) was higher than that in intensive farming systems (17.3%). In contrast, the point estimate of C. suis prevalence was lower in the extensive farming systems (5.1%) than in the intensive farming systems (10.0%), but the difference was not significant (P > 0.05). Among the four age categories, the highest total coccidia prevalence (26.2%) was found in finishing pigs, followed by suckling piglets (19.9%), whereas the highest prevalence of C. suis (14.9%) was observed in suckling piglets. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that coccidia infection in Chinese pigs is common, although the prevalence of C. suis in pigs does not receive sufficient attention. We recommend the rational use of anticoccidial drugs to avoid drug resistance and the development of preventive and control measures for C. suis to reduce the incidence of swine coccidiosis.


Subject(s)
Coccidiosis/epidemiology , Swine Diseases/epidemiology , Animals , China/epidemiology , Coccidia/classification , Coccidia/genetics , Coccidia/isolation & purification , Coccidia/physiology , Coccidiosis/parasitology , Feces/parasitology , Prevalence , Swine , Swine Diseases/parasitology
18.
China Tropical Medicine ; 21(8):774-778, 2021.
Article in Chinese | GIM | ID: covidwho-1498006

ABSTRACT

Objective: To investigate the CT features and clinical features of coronavirus disease 2019(COVID-19) patients imported from abroad, China and infected locally.

19.
Genomics and Applied Biology ; 39(8):3916-3918, 2020.
Article in Chinese | GIM | ID: covidwho-1497999

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2(SARS-CoV-2) causes coronavirus disease 2019(COVID-19). During the global coronavirus pandemic, there have been reports of cats and dogs being infected with SARS-COV-2. In order to effectively prevent and control COVID-19 and alleviate the panic among pet lovers, this study systematically reviews and comments the cases of human companion animal infections in cats and dogs during the COVID-19 outbreak, and summarizes and forecasts them. Existing studies have shown that cats are susceptible to novel coronavirus while dogs are less susceptible to virus infection. Cats and dogs are close "friends" of humans, and understanding their susceptibility to SARS-COV-2 will not only help humans to be "friendly" to them during outbreaks, but also help develop prevention and control strategies for COVID-19 and provide a basis for animal management models.

20.
Sustainability ; 13(21):11580, 2021.
Article in English | MDPI | ID: covidwho-1480981

ABSTRACT

The economy has suffered unprecedentedly during the COVID-19 pandemic, including the shared accommodation sector. This study aims to discover the pandemic consumer behavior model for the recovery of the sector as well as investigate the economic resilience of tourists’ behavior to prevent and control the normalized pandemic. Most of the resilience literature discussed the level of economic and industry revitalization. There are relatively few studies on the individual level of tourists’ resilience. Therefore, we applied the adjusted theory of planned behavior with pandemic-related intrinsic factors to construct the research model, which is analyzed by the SEM approach. The results show that perceived risk affects tourists’ perceived value, trust, and behavioral attitude when repurchasing shared accommodation during the pandemic. The repurchase intention is indirectly affected by the behavioral attitude and perceived value. We concluded that the perceived risk of the pandemic could be resilient with respect to the perceived value, trust, and behavioral attitude for the repurchase intention of the shared accommodation for the sector to recover.

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