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1.
EClinicalMedicine ; 54:101668-101668, 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-2047130

ABSTRACT

Background Data on the long-term trajectories of lung function are scarce in COVID-19 survivors. Methods We re-analyzed the data from a prospective longitudinal cohort follow-up study of COVID-19 survivors over 2 years after infection. All participants were divided into scale 3, scale 4 and scale 5-6 groups according to seven-category ordinal scale. The changes of pulmonary function tests (PFTs), the Modified Medical Research Council (mMRC) Dyspnea Scale, 6-min walking test health-related quality of life (HRQoL) across the three serial follow-up visits were evaluated, and compared among three groups. We performed liner regression to determine potential factors that were associated with changes of PFTs and distance walked in 6 minutes (6MWD). Findings In this study, 288 participants generally presented an improvement of PFTs parameters from 6 months to 1 year after infection. The scale 5-6 group displayed a significantly higher increase of PFTs compared with scale 3 and scale 4 groups (all p<0.0167), and corticosteroids therapy was identified as a protective factor for the PFTs improvement with a correlation coefficient of 2.730 (0.215–5.246) for forced vital capacity (FVC), 2.909 (0.383–5.436) for total lung capacity (TLC), and 3.299 (0.211–6.387) for diffusion capacity for carbon monoxide (DLco), respectively. From 1-year to 2-year follow-up, the PFTs parameters generally decreased, which was not observed to be associated with changes of 6MWD and HRQoL. Dyspnea (mMRC≥1) generally decreased over time (23.3% [61/262] for 6-month, 27.9% [67/240] for 1-year, 13.4% [35/261] for 2-year), and 6MWD increased continuously (500.0 m vs 505.0 m vs 525.0 m). Interpretation Corticosteroids therapy during hospitalization was a protective factor for PFTs improvement from 6 months to 1 year. The relatively fast decline trend of PFTs from 1 year to 2 years needs to be paid attention and further validated in the future follow-up study. Fundings This work was supported by Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences Innovation Fund for Medical Sciences (CIFMS 2021-I2M-1-048) and the National Key Research and Development Program of China (2021YFC0864700).

2.
Lancet Microbe ; 3(5): e348-e356, 2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1984300

ABSTRACT

Background: The memory immune response is crucial for preventing reinfection or reducing disease severity. However, the robustness and functionality of the humoral and T-cell response to SARS-CoV-2 remains unknown 12 months after initial infection. The aim of this study is to investigate the durability and functionality of the humoral and T-cell response to the original SARS-CoV-2 strain and variants in recovered patients 12 months after infection. Methods: In this longitudinal cohort study, we recruited participants who had recovered from COVID-19 and who were discharged from the Wuhan Research Center for Communicable Disease Diagnosis and Treatment at the Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Wuhan, China, between Jan 7 and May 29, 2020. Patients received a follow-up visit between Dec 16, 2020, and Jan 27, 2021. We evaluated the presence of IgM, IgA, and IgG antibodies against the SARS-CoV-2 nucleoprotein, Spike protein, and the receptor-binding domain 12 months after initial infection, using ELISA. Neutralising antibodies against the original SARS-CoV-2 strain, and the D614G, beta (B.1.351), and delta (B.1.617.2) variants were analysed using a microneutralisation assay in a subset of plasma samples. We analysed the magnitude and breadth of the SARS-CoV-2-specific memory T-cell responses using the interferon γ (IFNγ) enzyme-linked immune absorbent spot (ELISpot) assay and intracellular cytokine staining (ICS) assay. The antibody response and T-cell response (ie, IFN-γ, interleukin-2 [IL-2], and tumour necrosis factor α [TNFα]) were analysed by age and disease severity. Antibody titres were also analysed according to sequelae symptoms. Findings: We enrolled 1096 patients, including 289 (26·4%) patients with moderate initial disease, 734 (67·0%) with severe initial disease, and 73 (6·7%) with critical initial disease. Paired plasma samples were collected from 141 patients during the follow-up visits for the microneutralisation assay. PBMCs were collected from 92 of 141 individuals at the 12-month follow-up visit, of which 80 were analysed by ELISpot and 92 by ICS assay to detect the SARS-CoV-2-specific memory T-cell responses. N-IgG (899 [82·0%]), S-IgG (1043 [95·2%]), RBD-IgG (1032 [94·2%]), and neutralising (115 [81·6%] of 141) antibodies were detectable 12 months after initial infection in most individuals. Neutralising antibodies remained stable 6 and 12 months after initial infection in most individuals younger than 60 years. Multifunctional T-cell responses were detected for all SARS-CoV-2 viral proteins tested. There was no difference in the magnitude of T-cell responses or cytokine profiles in individuals with different symptom severity. Moreover, we evaluated both antibody and T-cell responses to the D614G, beta, and delta viral strains. The degree of reduced in-vitro neutralising antibody responses to the D614G and delta variants, but not to the beta variant, was associated with the neutralising antibody titres after SARS-CoV-2 infection. We also found poor neutralising antibody responses to the beta variant; 83 (72·2%) of 115 patients showed no response at all. Moreover, the neutralising antibody titre reduction of the recovered patient plasma against the delta variant was similar to that of the D614G variant and lower than that of the beta variant. By contrast, T-cell responses were cross-reactive to the beta variant in most individuals. Importantly, T-cell responses could be detected in all individuals who had lost the neutralising antibody response to SARS-CoV-2 12 months after the initial infection. Interpretation: SARS-CoV-2-specific neutralising antibody and T-cell responses were retained 12 months after initial infection. Neutralising antibodies to the D614G, beta, and delta viral strains were reduced compared with those for the original strain, and were diminished in general. Memory T-cell responses to the original strain were not disrupted by new variants. This study suggests that cross-reactive SARS-CoV-2-specific T-cell responses could be particularly important in the protection against severe disease caused by variants of concern whereas neutralising antibody responses seem to reduce over time. Funding: Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, National Natural Science Foundation, and UK Medical Research Council.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Antibodies, Neutralizing , Antibodies, Viral , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cohort Studies , Cytokines , Humans , Immunoglobulin G , Longitudinal Studies , T-Lymphocytes
3.
Open Forum Infect Dis ; 9(6): ofac170, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1860897

ABSTRACT

Background: Detailed characteristics of rheumatic symptoms of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) were still unknown. We aim to investigate the proportions, characteristics, and risk factors of this condition. Methods: In this prospective, longitudinal cohort study, discharged patients with COVID-19 were interviewed face-to-face at 12 months after symptom onset. Rheumatic symptoms following COVID-19 included newly occurring joint pain and/or joint swelling. The risk factors of developing rheumatic symptoms were identified by multivariable logistic regression analysis. Results: In total, 1296 of 2469 discharged patients with COVID-19 were enrolled in this study. Among them, 160 (12.3% [95% confidence interval {CI}, 10.6%-14.3%]) suffered from rheumatic symptoms following COVID-19 at 12-month follow-up. The most frequently involved joints were the knee joints (38%), followed by hand (25%) and shoulder (19%). Rheumatic symptoms were independent of the severity of illness and corticosteroid treatment during the acute phase, while elderly age (odds ratio [OR], 1.22 [95% CI, 1.06-1.40]) and female sex (OR, 1.58 [95% CI, 1.12-2.23]) were identified as the risk factors for this condition. Conclusions: Our investigation showed a considerable proportion of rheumatic symptoms following COVID-19 in discharged patients, which highlights the need for continuing attention. Notably, rheumatic symptoms following COVID-19 were independent of the severity of illness and corticosteroid treatment during the acute phase.

4.
Open forum infectious diseases ; 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1787130

ABSTRACT

Background Detailed characteristics of rheumatic symptoms of COVID-19 were still unknown. We aim to investigate the proportions, characteristics, and risk factors of this condition. Methods In this prospective, longitudinal cohort study, discharged patients with COVID-19 were face-to-face interviewed at 12 months after symptom onset. Rheumatic symptoms following COVID-19 included newly occurring joint pain, and (/or) joint swelling after COVID-19. The risk factors of developing rheumatic symptoms were identified by multivariable logistic regressions. Results In total, 1296 of 2469 discharged patients with COVID-19 were enrolled in this study. Among them, 160 (12.3% [95% CI 10.6, 14.3]) suffered from rheumatic symptoms following COVID-19 at 12-month follow-up. The most frequently involved joints were the knee joints (38%), followed by hand (25%) and shoulder (19%). Rheumatic symptoms were independent of the severity of illness and corticosteroid treatment during acute phase, while elderly (OR 1.22, 95%CI 1.06, 1.40) and women (OR 1.58, 95%CI 1.12, 2.23) were identified as the risk factors for this condition. Conclusions Our investigation showed a considerable proportion of rheumatic symptoms following COVID-19 in discharged patients, which highlights the need for continuing attention. Notably, rheumatic symptoms following COVID-19 were independent of the severity of illness and corticosteroid treatment during acute phase.

5.
Chin Med J (Engl) ; 133(9): 1015-1024, 2020 May 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1722617

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Human infections with zoonotic coronaviruses (CoVs), including severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)-CoV and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS)-CoV, have raised great public health concern globally. Here, we report a novel bat-origin CoV causing severe and fatal pneumonia in humans. METHODS: We collected clinical data and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) specimens from five patients with severe pneumonia from Wuhan Jinyintan Hospital, Hubei province, China. Nucleic acids of the BAL were extracted and subjected to next-generation sequencing. Virus isolation was carried out, and maximum-likelihood phylogenetic trees were constructed. RESULTS: Five patients hospitalized from December 18 to December 29, 2019 presented with fever, cough, and dyspnea accompanied by complications of acute respiratory distress syndrome. Chest radiography revealed diffuse opacities and consolidation. One of these patients died. Sequence results revealed the presence of a previously unknown ß-CoV strain in all five patients, with 99.8% to 99.9% nucleotide identities among the isolates. These isolates showed 79.0% nucleotide identity with the sequence of SARS-CoV (GenBank NC_004718) and 51.8% identity with the sequence of MERS-CoV (GenBank NC_019843). The virus is phylogenetically closest to a bat SARS-like CoV (SL-ZC45, GenBank MG772933) with 87.6% to 87.7% nucleotide identity, but is in a separate clade. Moreover, these viruses have a single intact open reading frame gene 8, as a further indicator of bat-origin CoVs. However, the amino acid sequence of the tentative receptor-binding domain resembles that of SARS-CoV, indicating that these viruses might use the same receptor. CONCLUSION: A novel bat-borne CoV was identified that is associated with severe and fatal respiratory disease in humans.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Adult , Aged , Betacoronavirus/genetics , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/diagnostic imaging , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnostic imaging , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Tomography, X-Ray , Treatment Outcome
6.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-323626

ABSTRACT

Background: Coronavirus disease 2019(COVID-19) is a worldwide pandemic.In this study, we aimed to evaluate the risk factors of death from severe and critical COVID-19 patients. Method: A retrospective study of patients diagnosed with severe and critical COVID-19 from four hospitals in Wuhan, China, describing the clinical characteristics and laboratory results, and using Cox regression to study the risk factors was conducted. Results: Four hundred and forty-six patients with COVID-19 showed a high case fatality rate(CFR)(20.2%). All patients required oxygen therapy, and 52(12%) patients required invasive mechanical ventilation,of which 50(96%) patients died.The univariate Cox proportional hazard model showed a white blood cell count of more than 10 × 10⁹/L(HR3.903,95%CI 2.413 to 6.313),patients’ risk of death significantly increased.The multivariate Cox proportional hazard model demonstrated that older age (HR 1.074, 95% CI 1.050 to 1.098) was an independent risk factor and high white blood cell count(HR 1.119, 95% CI 1.056 to 1.186)was a predictive factor for COVID-19 on admission. Conclusions: COVID-19 is a new disease entity that carries significant risk of morbidity and CFR.Older age was an independent risk factor and high white blood cell was a predictive factor for COVID-19.

7.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-319973

ABSTRACT

Background: The pandemic of Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is ongoing globally, which is a big challenge for public health. Alteration of human microbiota had been observed in COVID-19. However, it is unknown how the microbiota is associated with the fatality in COVID-19.Methods: We conducted metatranscriptome sequencing on 588 longitudinal oropharyngeal swab specimens collected from 192 COVID-19 patients recruited in the LOTUS clinical trial (Registration number: ChiCTR2000029308) (including 39 deceased patients), and 95 healthy controls from the same geographic area.Findings: The upper respiratory tract (URT) microbiota in COVID-19 patients differed from that in healthy controls, while deceased patients possessed a more distinct microbiota. Streptococcus was enriched in recovered patients, whereas potential pathogens, including Candida and Enterococcus, were more abundant in deceased patients. Moreover, the microbiota dominated by Streptococcus was more stable than that dominated by other species. In contrast, the URT microbiota in deceased patients showed a more significant alteration and became more deviated from the norm after admission. The abundance of Streptococcus on admission, particularly that of S. parasanguis, was identified as a strong predictor of fatality by Cox and L1 regularized logistic regression analysis, thus could be used as a potential prognostic biomarker of COVID-19.Interpretation Alteration of the URT microbiota was observed in COVID-19 patients and was associated with the fatality rate. A higher abundance of Streptococcus, especially S. parasanguis, on admission in oropharyngeal swabs predicts a better outcome. The generalization of the results in other populations and underlying mechanisms need further investigations.Trial Registration: Participants were enrolled in ChiCTR2000029308.Funding: This study was funded in part by the National Major Science & Technology Project for Control and Prevention of Major Infectious Diseases in China (2017ZX10103004, 2018ZX10301401), the Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences (CAMS) Innovation Fund for Medical Sciences (2019-I2M-2-XX, 2016-I2M-1-014, 2018-I2M-1-003), The Non-profit Central Research Institute Fund of CAMS (2020HY320001, 2019PT310029), Beijing Advanced Innovation Center for Genomics (ICG), and Beijing Advanced Innovation Center for Structural Biology (ICSB).Declaration of Interests: All authors declare no competing interests.Ethics Approval Statement: The study was approved by the Institutional Review Board of Jin Yin-Tan Hospital (KY2020-02.01). Written informed consent was obtained from all patients or their legal representatives if they were too unwell to provide consent.

8.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-315786

ABSTRACT

Objectives: Since December 2019, a outbreak of Corona Virus Disease-2019(COVID-19) started in Wuhan, China. Now we comprehended much more about the troublesome disease from studies than the beginning. But more details between admission laboratory test and prognosis of COVID-19 were still confusing. So we focused on the admission biochemical test, and tried to verify their influence to the prognosis of COVID-19. Method: 522 patients from 4 hospitals were enrolled in this retrospective cohort study. We collected demographic information, comorbidities and laboratory biochemical indicators, then compared them between survivors’ and nonsurvivors’ group. Logistic regression methods were used to explore the risk factors associated with in-hospital death. Linear regression and receiver operating characteristic curve(ROC-curve) was applied to assess the efficiency of risk factors and regression model. Results: Age of nonsurvivors’ group(68.9) was older than survivors group(50.0). Diabetes(68.7%) was the most common comorbidity in the nonsurvivors’ group. In univariate regression analysis, most biochemical tests were related to the mortality except lipid metabolic results. Age, fasting blood glucose and blood urea nitrogen(BUN) were with a p-value less than 0.001 in multivariate regression model. Conclusion: Age, BUN and fasting blood glucose were risk factors associated with the prognosis of COVID-19 related pneumonia.Authors Qi Long, Chen-liang Zhou, Ye-ming Wang, Bin Song, Xiao-bin Cheng, Qiu-fen Dong, and Liu-lin Wang contributed equally to this work.

9.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-312520

ABSTRACT

Background: A novel coronavirus emerged in Wuhan, Hubei Province, China towards the end of 2019 (SARS-CoV-2 or COVID-19 virus). Large scale spread within China and internationally led the World Health Organisation to declare a Public Health Emergency of International Concern on 30 th January 2020. The clinical manifestations of COVID-19 virus infection include asymptomatic infection, mild upper respiratory symptoms, severe viral pneumonia with respiratory failure and even death. There are no antivirals of proven clinical efficacy in coronavirus infections. Remdesivir (GS-5734), a nucleoside analogue, has inhibitory effects on animal and human highly pathogenic coronaviruses, including MERS-CoV and SARS-CoV, in in-vitro and in-vivo experiments. It is also inhibitory against the COVID-19 virus in-vitro. The aim of this study is to assess the efficacy and safety of remdesivir in adult patients with severe pneumonia caused by COVID-19 virus infection. Methods: The protocol is prepared in accordance with the SPIRIT (Standard Protocol Items: Recommendations for Interventional Trials) guidelines. This is a phase 3, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicentre trial. Adults (≥18 years) with laboratory confirmed COVID-19 virus infection, and severe pneumonia signs or symptoms, and radiologically confirmed severe pneumonia are randomly assigned in a 2:1 ratio to intravenous remdesivir or placebo for 10 days. The primary endpoint is time to clinical improvement (censored at Day 28), defined as the time (in days) from randomization of study treatment (remdesivir or placebo) until a decline of two categories on a six-category ordinal scale of clinical status (1 ꞊ discharged;6 ꞊ death) or live discharge from hospital. One interim analysis for efficacy and futility will be conducted once half of the total number of events required had been observed. Discussion: This is the first randomized, placebo-controlled trial in 2019-nCoV. Enrolment began in sites in Wuhan, Hubei Province, China on 6 th February 2020. Trial registration : ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT04257656, 6 th February 2020.

10.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-311704

ABSTRACT

Background: Seasonal human coronaviruses (HCoVs) including HCoV-229E, -OC43, -NL63 and -HKU1 are widely spreading in global human populations. However, the relevance of humoral response against seasonal HCoVs to COVID-19 pathogenesis is elusive.Methods: We profiled the temporal changes of IgG antibodies against spike (S;S-IgG) proteins of SARS-CoV-2 and seasonal HCoVs in 838 plasma samples collected from 344 COVID-19 patients. We tested the antigenic cross-reactivity of S protein between SARS-CoV-2 and seasonal HCoVs and evaluated the correlations between HCoV-OC43 S-IgG antibody and disease severity in COVID-19 patients.Findings: SARS-CoV-2 S-IgG titers mounted until days 22–28, whereas HCoV-OC43 antibody titers increased until days 15–21 and then plateaued until day 46. However, IgG antibody titers against HCoV-NL63, -229E, and -HKU1 showed no significant increasing. A two-way cross-reactivity was identified between SARS-CoV-2 and HCoV-OC43. Neutralizing antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 were not detected in healthy controls who were positive for HCoV-OC43 S-IgG. HCoV-OC43 S-IgG titers were significantly higher in patients with severe disease than those in mild/moderate patients at days 1–21 post symptom onset (PSO). Higher levels of HCoV-OC43 S-IgG were also observed in patients requiring mechanical ventilation and the elderly. At days 1–10 PSO, HCoV-OC43 S-IgG titers correlated to disease severity in all age groups, and to fatality in over 60-year group.Interpretation: Our data indicate that there exist a humoral cross-reactive response between HCoV-OC43 and SARS-CoV-2. The cross-reactive HCoV-OC43 S-IgG antibody is not protective against SARS-CoV-2, but may be a risk factor for the severity and adverse outcome of COVID-19.Funding Statement: This study was funded in part by the National Major Science & Technology Project for Control and Prevention of Major Infectious Diseases in China (2017ZX10204401, 2018ZX10734404), Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences (CAMS) Innovation Fund for Medical Sciences (2016-I2M-1–014, 2018-I2M-1-003, 2020-I2M-1-001, 2020-I2M-CoV19-005), Natural Science Foundation of China (82041011/H0104), and National Key R&D Program of China (2020YFA0707600). Declaration of Interests: The authors declare no competing interests.Ethics Approval Statement: This study was approved by the Ethical Review Board of Wuhan Jinyintan Hospital, Infectious Disease Hospital of Heilongjiang Province (Harbin), and Institute of Pathogen Biology, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences. Written informed consent was obtained from each healthy volunteer and COVID-19 patients in cohort 4. Written informed consents from the remaining patients were waived in light of the emerging infectious disease of high public health relevance.

11.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-309595

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Endpoint choice for randomized controlled trials of treatments for COVID-19 is complex. A new disease brings many uncertainties, but trials must start rapidly. COVID-19 is heterogeneous, ranging from mild disease that improves within days to critical disease that can last weeks and can end in death. While improvement in mortality would provide unquestionable evidence about clinical significance of a treatment, sample sizes for a study evaluating mortality are large and may be impractical. Furthermore, patient states in between "cure" and "death" represent meaningful distinctions. Clinical severity scores have been proposed as an alternative. However, the appropriate summary measure for severity scores has been the subject of debate, particularly in relating to the uncertainty about the time-course of COVID-19. Outcomes measured at fixed time-points may risk missing the time of clinical benefit. An endpoint such as time-to-improvement (or recovery), avoids the timing problem. However, some have argued that power losses will result from reducing the ordinal scale to a binary state of "recovered" vs "not recovered." Methods: We evaluate statistical power for possible trial endpoints for COVID-19 treatment trials using simulation models and data from two recent COVID-19 treatment trials. Results: Power for fixed-time point methods depends heavily on the time selected for evaluation. Time-to-improvement (or recovery) analyses do not specify a time-point. Time-to-event approaches have reasonable statistical power, even when compared to a fixed time-point method evaluated at the optimal time. Discussion: Time-to-event analyses methods have advantages in the COVID-19 setting, unless the optimal time for evaluating treatment effect is known in advance. Even when the optimal time is known, a time-to-event approach may increase power for interim analyses.

12.
Front Med (Lausanne) ; 8: 800492, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1686495

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Cytokine storm observed in patients with severe Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) contributes to poor clinical outcomes and increased mortality. Janus kinases (JAKs) are important mediators in the cytokine storm. Therefore, we conduct a living systematic review and meta-analysis of the literature investigating efficacy and safety of JAK inhibitors for patients with COVID-19. METHODS: Databases were searched up to December 1, 2021 for interventional and observational studies comparing JAK inhibitor treatment with concurrent control in patients with COVID-19. Efficacy and safety outcomes were evaluated by pooled risk ratio (RR). RESULTS: Of 3,170 records retrieved, 15 studies were eligible and 13 were evaluated in the meta-analysis (n = 3,977). Based on data from three randomized controlled trials (RCTs), baricitinib treatment significantly decreased mortality by day 28 in hospitalized patients with COVID-19 (RR = 0.64, 95% CI 0.51-0.80) without increasing the incidence of adverse outcomes. In subgroup analysis, patients who required supplemental oxygen (RR = 0.62, 95% CI 0.41-0.95) or high-flow oxygen/non-invasive ventilation (RR = 0.59, 95% CI 0.42-0.85) at baseline benefited most. Pooled analysis of all eligible studies for JAK inhibitors (baricitinib, ruxolitinib, tofacitinib, and nezulcitinib) demonstrated a significant decrease in mortality (RR = 0.62, 95% CI 0.49-0.78) with no increase in the risk of adverse events. CONCLUSION: Baricitinib probably decreases mortality in hospitalized adult patients with COVID-19, especially for patients who required supplemental oxygen or high-flow oxygen/non-invasive ventilation at baseline. The efficacy and safety of other JAK inhibitors, such as ruxolitinib, tofacitinib, and nezulcitinib, await more evidence. SYSTEMATIC REVIEW REGISTRATION: https://www.crd.york.ac.uk/prospero/display_record.php?ID=CRD42021261414, identifier: CRD42021261414.

13.
Virol Sin ; 37(1): 30-37, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1639630

ABSTRACT

Little is known about Subgenomic RNA (sgRNA) dynamics in patients with Coronavirus diseases 2019 (COVID-19). We collected 147 throat swabs, 74 gut swabs and 46 plasma samples from 117 COVID-19 patients recruited in the LOTUS China trial (ChiCTR2000029308) and compared E and orf7a sgRNA load in patients with different illness duration, outcome, and comorbidities. Both sgRNAs were detected in all the three types of samples, with longest duration of 25, 13, and 17 days for E sgRNA, and 32, 28, and 17 days for orf7a sgRNA in throat, gut, and plasma, respectively. A total of 95% (57/60) of patients had no E sgRNA detected after 10 days post treatment, though 86% of them were still E RNA positive. High correlation on titer was observed between sgRNA encoding E and orf7a gene. sgRNA showed similar variation in the standard care and Lopinavir-Ritonavir group. Patients with diabetes and heart diseases showed higher pharyngeal E sgRNA at the first day (P â€‹= â€‹0.016 and 0.013, respectively) but no difference at five days after treatment, compared with patients without such commodities. Patients with hypertension and cerebrovascular diseases showed no difference in the pharyngeal sgRNA levels at both one and five days after treatment, compared with patients without these two commodities. E sgRNA levels in the initial infection showed no correlation with the serum antibody against spike, nucleoprotein, and receptor binding domains at ten days later. sgRNA lasted a long period in COVID-19 patients and might have little effect on humoral response.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , China , Humans , RNA, Viral/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Serologic Tests
14.
EBioMedicine ; 76: 103817, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1632870

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Kidney damage in COVID-19 patients has been of special concern. The association of acute kidney injury (AKI) with post-acute kidney function among COVID-19 survivors was not sufficiently elucidated. METHODS: An ambidirectional cohort study was conducted with enrollment of COVID-19 survivors discharged from hospital between Jan 7, and May 29, 2020. Study participants were invited to follow-up visits at 6 and 12 months after symptom onset. The primary outcome was percentage of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) decreased from acute phase (between symptom onset and hospital discharge) to follow-up, and secondary outcome was reduced renal function at follow-up. FINDINGS: In total, 1,734 study participants were included in this study. Median follow-up duration was 342.0 days (IQR, 223.0-358.0) after symptom onset. After multivariable adjustment, percentage of eGFR decreased from acute phase to follow-up was 8.30% (95% CI, 5.99-10.61) higher among AKI participants than those without AKI at acute phase. Participants with AKI had an odds ratio (OR) of 4.60 (95% CI, 2.10-10.08) for reduced renal function at follow-up. The percentage of eGFR decreased for participants with AKI stage 1, stage 2, and stage 3 was 6.02% (95% CI, 3.48-8.57), 15.99% (95% CI, 10.77-21.22), and 17.79% (95% CI, 9.14-26.43) higher compared with those without AKI, respectively. INTERPRETATION: AKI at acute phase of COVID-19 was closely related to the longitudinal decline and post-acute status of kidney function at nearly one-year after symptom onset. Earlier and more intense follow-up strategies on kidney function management could be beneficial to COVID-19 survivors. FUNDING: Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences Innovation Fund for Medical Sciences (CIFMS 2020-I2M-CoV19-005, 2018-I2M-1-003, and 2020-I2M-2-013); National Natural Science Foundation of China (82041011); National Key Research and Development Program of China (2018YFC1200102); Major Projects of National Science and Technology on New Drug Creation and Development of Pulmonary Tuberculosis (2020ZX09201001).


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury/diagnosis , COVID-19/pathology , Kidney/physiology , Acute Kidney Injury/etiology , Aged , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/virology , Cohort Studies , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Glomerular Filtration Rate , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Odds Ratio , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Severity of Illness Index , Survivors
15.
Front Immunol ; 12: 791348, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1608514

ABSTRACT

Background: Striking similarities have been found between coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and anti-melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (MDA5) antibody (Ab)-related dermatomyositis, implying a shared autoinflammatory aberrance. Herein, we aim to investigate whether the anti-MDA5 Ab is present in COVID-19 and correlates with the severity and adverse outcome of COVID-19 patients. Methods and Findings: We retrospectively recruited 274 adult inpatients with COVID-19 in this study, including 48, 164, and 62 cases of deaths, severe, and non-severe patients respectively. The anti-MDA5 Ab was determined by ELISA and verified by Western Blotting, which indicated that the positive rate of anti-MDA5 Ab in COVID-19 patients was 48.2% (132/274). The clinical and laboratory features, as well as outcomes between patients with positive and negative anti-MDA5 Ab were compared and we found that the anti-MDA5 Ab positive patients tended to represent severe disease (88.6% vs 66.9%, P<0.0001). We also demonstrated that the titer of anti-MDA5 Ab was significantly elevated in the non-survivals (5.95 ± 5.16 vs 8.22 ± 6.64, P=0.030) and the positive rate was also higher than that in the survivals (23.5% vs 12.0%, P=0.012). Regarding severe COVID-19 patients, we found that high titer of anti-MDA5 Ab (≥10.0 U/mL) was more prevalent in the non-survivals (31.2% vs 14.0%, P=0.006). Moreover, a dynamic analysis of anti-MDA5 Ab was conducted at different time-points of COVID-19, which revealed that early profiling of anti-MDA5 Ab could distinguish severe patients from those with non-severe ones. Conclusions: Anti-MDA5 Ab was prevalent in the COVID-19 patients and high titer of this antibody is correlated with severe disease and unfavorable outcomes.


Subject(s)
Antibodies/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Interferon-Induced Helicase, IFIH1/immunology , Severity of Illness Index , Adult , Aged , Antibodies/blood , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Disease Progression , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay/methods , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
16.
Am J Respir Crit Care Med ; 204(12): 1379-1390, 2021 12 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1430274

ABSTRACT

Rationale: Alteration of human respiratory microbiota had been observed in coronavirus disease (COVID-19). How the microbiota is associated with the prognosis in COVID-19 is unclear. Objectives: To characterize the feature and dynamics of the respiratory microbiota and its associations with clinical features in patients with COVID-19. Methods: We conducted metatranscriptome sequencing on 588 longitudinal oropharyngeal swab specimens collected from 192 patients with COVID-19 (including 39 deceased patients) and 95 healthy controls from the same geographic area. Meanwhile, the concentration of 27 cytokines and chemokines in plasma was measured for patients with COVID-19. Measurements and Main Results: The upper respiratory tract (URT) microbiota in patients with COVID-19 differed from that in healthy controls, whereas deceased patients possessed a more distinct microbiota, both on admission and before discharge/death. The alteration of URT microbiota showed a significant correlation with the concentration of proinflammatory cytokines and mortality. Specifically, Streptococcus-dominated microbiota was enriched in recovered patients, and showed high temporal stability and resistance against pathogens. In contrast, the microbiota in deceased patients was more susceptible to secondary infections and became more deviated from the norm after admission. Moreover, the abundance of S. parasanguinis on admission was significantly correlated with prognosis in nonsevere patients (lower vs. higher abundance, odds ratio, 7.80; 95% CI, 1.70-42.05). Conclusions: URT microbiota dysbiosis is a remarkable manifestation of COVID-19; its association with mortality suggests it may reflect the interplay between pathogens, symbionts, and the host immune status. Whether URT microbiota could be used as a biomarker for diagnosis and prognosis of respiratory diseases merits further investigation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/microbiology , COVID-19/mortality , Microbiota , Respiratory Tract Infections/microbiology , Respiratory Tract Infections/mortality , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prognosis , SARS-CoV-2
17.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 17791, 2021 09 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1397897

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this study is to explore whether uric acid (UA) can independently act as a prognostic factor and critical marker of the 2019 novel corona virus disease (COVID-19). A multicenter, retrospective, and observational study including 540 patients with confirmed COVID-19 was carried out at four designated hospitals in Wuhan. Demographic, clinical, laboratory data were collected and analyzed. The primary end point was in-hospital death of patients with COVID-19. The concentration of admission UA (adUA) and the lowest concentration of uric acid during hospitalization (lowUA) in the dead patients were significantly lower than those in the survivors. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed the concentration of lowUA (OR 0.986, 95% CI 0.980-0.992, p < 0.001) was able to independently predict the risk of in-hospital death. The mean survival time in the low-level group of lowUA was significantly lower than other groups. When lowUA was ≤ 166 µmol/L, the sensitivity and specificity in predicting hospital short-term mortality were 76.9%, (95% CI 68.5-85.1%) and 74.9% (95% CI 70.3-78.9%). This retrospective study determined that the lowest concentration of UA during hospitalization can be used as a prognostic indicator and a marker of disease severity in severe patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , Uric Acid/blood , Adult , Aged , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , China/epidemiology , Feasibility Studies , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Kaplan-Meier Estimate , Male , Middle Aged , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , Risk Assessment/methods , Risk Factors , Sensitivity and Specificity , Severity of Illness Index
18.
Lancet ; 398(10302): 747-758, 2021 08 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1376121

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The full range of long-term health consequences of COVID-19 in patients who are discharged from hospital is largely unclear. The aim of our study was to comprehensively compare consequences between 6 months and 12 months after symptom onset among hospital survivors with COVID-19. METHODS: We undertook an ambidirectional cohort study of COVID-19 survivors who had been discharged from Jin Yin-tan Hospital (Wuhan, China) between Jan 7 and May 29, 2020. At 6-month and 12-month follow-up visit, survivors were interviewed with questionnaires on symptoms and health-related quality of life (HRQoL), and received a physical examination, a 6-min walking test, and laboratory tests. They were required to report their health-care use after discharge and work status at the 12-month visit. Survivors who had completed pulmonary function tests or had lung radiographic abnormality at 6 months were given the corresponding tests at 12 months. Non-COVID-19 participants (controls) matched for age, sex, and comorbidities were interviewed and completed questionnaires to assess prevalent symptoms and HRQoL. The primary outcomes were symptoms, modified British Medical Research Council (mMRC) score, HRQoL, and distance walked in 6 min (6MWD). Multivariable adjusted logistic regression models were used to evaluate the risk factors of 12-month outcomes. FINDINGS: 1276 COVID-19 survivors completed both visits. The median age of patients was 59·0 years (IQR 49·0-67·0) and 681 (53%) were men. The median follow-up time was 185·0 days (IQR 175·0-198·0) for the 6-month visit and 349·0 days (337·0-361·0) for the 12-month visit after symptom onset. The proportion of patients with at least one sequelae symptom decreased from 68% (831/1227) at 6 months to 49% (620/1272) at 12 months (p<0·0001). The proportion of patients with dyspnoea, characterised by mMRC score of 1 or more, slightly increased from 26% (313/1185) at 6-month visit to 30% (380/1271) at 12-month visit (p=0·014). Additionally, more patients had anxiety or depression at 12-month visit (26% [331/1271] at 12-month visit vs 23% [274/1187] at 6-month visit; p=0·015). No significant difference on 6MWD was observed between 6 months and 12 months. 88% (422/479) of patients who were employed before COVID-19 had returned to their original work at 12 months. Compared with men, women had an odds ratio of 1·43 (95% CI 1·04-1·96) for fatigue or muscle weakness, 2·00 (1·48-2·69) for anxiety or depression, and 2·97 (1·50-5·88) for diffusion impairment. Matched COVID-19 survivors at 12 months had more problems with mobility, pain or discomfort, and anxiety or depression, and had more prevalent symptoms than did controls. INTERPRETATION: Most COVID-19 survivors had a good physical and functional recovery during 1-year follow-up, and had returned to their original work and life. The health status in our cohort of COVID-19 survivors at 12 months was still lower than that in the control population. FUNDING: Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences Innovation Fund for Medical Sciences, the National Natural Science Foundation of China, the National Key Research and Development Program of China, Major Projects of National Science and Technology on New Drug Creation and Development of Pulmonary Tuberculosis, the China Evergrande Group, Jack Ma Foundation, Sino Biopharmaceutical, Ping An Insurance (Group), and New Sunshine Charity Foundation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Survivors , Aged , Anxiety/etiology , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19/psychology , Depression/etiology , Exercise Tolerance , Fatigue/etiology , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Lung/physiopathology , Male , Middle Aged , Muscle Weakness/etiology , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2 , Walk Test
19.
BMJ Open ; 11(8): e049515, 2021 08 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1346064

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Current antibiotic prescription for acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) is generally based on the Anthonisen criteria in The Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (GOLD) guideline that have a potential risk of antibiotics overuse. The dilemma is to identify patients who are most likely to benefit from antibiotics while avoiding unnecessary antibiotic use. Procalcitonin (PCT), a more sensitive and specific biomarker of bacterial infection than other conventional laboratory tests, has the potential to determine those patients in whom antibiotics would be beneficial. It is unclear whether PCT-guided antibiotic therapy is safe and effective for patients hospitalised with AECOPD. The study hypothesis is that PCT-guided antibiotic therapy could reduce the antibiotic prescription rate for AECOPD, compared with the GOLD guideline recommendations, without negatively impacting the treatment success rate. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: In this multicenter, open-label, randomised controlled trial, we aim to enrol 500 hospitalised patients with AECOPD that will be randomly assigned to either a PCT-guided group or a GOLD guideline-guided group. The coprimary endpoints are antibiotic prescription rate for AECOPD within 30 days post randomisation and treatment success rate at day 30 post randomisation. The secondary outcomes include: antibiotic prescription rate at day 1 post randomisation; hospital antibiotic exposure; length of hospital stay; rate of subsequent exacerbation and hospital readmission; overall mortality within 30 days post randomisation; changes in lung function and the score of COPD assessment test and modified Medical Research Council; and rate of intensive care unit admission. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: This trial has been approved by the ethic committee of China-Japan Friendship Hospital. The findings of the study will be disseminated in peer-reviewed journals. If the results of the study are positive, PCT-guided antibiotic therapy is likely to change the guidelines for antibiotic recommendations for patients with AECOPD. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT04682899.


Subject(s)
Bacterial Infections , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Bacterial Infections/drug therapy , Humans , Inpatients , Multicenter Studies as Topic , Procalcitonin , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/drug therapy , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
20.
Clin Infect Dis ; 72(10): e545-e551, 2021 05 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1232187

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The characteristics of neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) and antibody against major antigen proteins related to clinical outcomes in severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients were still less known. METHODS: NAbs and antibodies targeting nucleocapsid (N), spike protein (S), and the receptor-binding domain (RBD) in longitudinal plasma samples from the LOTUS China trial were measured by microneutralization assay and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Viral load was determined by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). A total of 576 plasma and 576 throat swabs were collected from 191 COVID-19 patients. Antibody titers related to adverse outcome and clinical improvement were analyzed. Multivariable adjusted generalized linear mixed model for random effects were developed. RESULTS: After day 28 post symptoms onset, the rate of antibody positivity reached 100% for RBD-immunoglobulin M (IgM), 97.8% for S-IgM, 100% for N-immunoglobulin G (IgG), 100% for RBD-IgG, 91.1% for N-IgM, and 91.1% for NAbs. The NAbs titers increased over time in both survivors and nonsurvivors and correlated to IgG antibodies against N, S, and RBD, whereas its presence showed no statistical correlation with death. N-IgG (slope -2.11, 95% confidence interval [CI] -3.04 to -1.18, P < .0001), S-IgG (slope -2.44, 95% CI -3.35 to -1.54, P < .0001), and RBD-IgG (slope -1.43, 95% CI -1.98 to -.88, P < .0001) were negatively correlated with viral load. S-IgG titers were lower in nonsurvivors than survivors (P = .020) at week 4 after symptoms onset. CONCLUSIONS: IgM and IgG against N, S, and RBD and NAbs developed in most severe COVID-19 patients and do not correlate clearly with clinical outcomes. The levels of IgG antibodies against N, S, and RBD were related to viral clearance.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adult , Antibodies, Viral , Antibody Formation , China/epidemiology , Humans , Immunoglobulin M , SARS-CoV-2
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