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1.
Med Sci Monit ; 27: e926751, 2021 Feb 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1079820

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is spreading rapidly worldwide, and scientists are trying to find a way to overcome the disease. We explored the risk factors that influence patient outcomes, including treatment regimens, which can provide a reference for further treatment. MATERIAL AND METHODS A retrospective cohort study analysis was performed using data from 97 patients with COVID-19 who visited Wuhan Union Hospital from February 2020 to March 2020. We collected data on demographics, comorbidities, clinical manifestations, laboratory tests, treatment methods, outcomes, and complications. Patients were divided into a recovered group and a deceased group. We compared the differences between the 2 groups and analyzed risk factors influencing the treatment effect. RESULTS Seventy-six patients recovered and 21 died. The average age and body mass index (BMI) of the deceased group were significantly higher than those of the recovered group (69.81±6.80 years vs 60.79±11.28 years, P<0.001 and 24.95±3.14 kg/m² vs 23.09±2.97 kg/m², P=0.014, respectively). The combination of antiviral drugs and supportive therapy appears to be associated with the lowest mortality (P<0.05). Multivariate Cox regression analysis revealed that age, BMI, H-CRP, shock, and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) were independent risk factors for patients with COVID-19 (P<0.05). CONCLUSIONS Elderly patients and those with a high BMI, as well as patients who experience shock and ARDS, may have a higher risk of death from COVID-19. The combination of antiviral drugs and supportive therapy appears to be associated with lower mortality, although further research is needed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/mortality , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/mortality , Shock/mortality , Age Factors , Aged , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/virology , China/epidemiology , Drug Therapy, Combination/methods , Drugs, Chinese Herbal/therapeutic use , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Kaplan-Meier Estimate , Male , Middle Aged , Prognosis , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/etiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Shock/etiology , Shock/therapy , Treatment Outcome , gamma-Globulins/therapeutic use
2.
Clinical eHealth ; 3:7-15, 2020.
Article in English | PMC | ID: covidwho-822402

ABSTRACT

The aim is to diagnose COVID-19 earlier and to improve its treatment by applying medical technology, the “COVID-19 Intelligent Diagnosis and Treatment Assistant Program (nCapp)” based on the Internet of Things. Terminal eight functions can be implemented in real-time online communication with the “cloud” through the page selection key. According to existing data, questionnaires, and check results, the diagnosis is automatically generated as confirmed, suspected, or suspicious of 2019 novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV) infection. It classifies patients into mild, moderate, severe or critical pneumonia. nCapp can also establish an online COVID-19 real-time update database, and it updates the model of diagnosis in real time based on the latest real-world case data to improve diagnostic accuracy. Additionally, nCapp can guide treatment. Front-line physicians, experts, and managers are linked to perform consultation and prevention. nCapp also contributes to the long-term follow-up of patients with COVID-19. The ultimate goal is to enable different levels of COVID-19 diagnosis and treatment among different doctors from different hospitals to upgrade to the national and international through the intelligent assistance of the nCapp system. In this way, we can block disease transmission, avoid physician infection, and epidemic prevention and control as soon as possible.

3.
BMC Infect Dis ; 20(1): 329, 2020 May 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-197493

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Although people of all ages are susceptible to the novel coronavirus infection, which is presently named "Coronavirus Disease 2019" (COVID-19), there has been relatively few cases reported among children. Therefore, it is necessary to understand the clinical characteristics of COVID-19 in children and the differences from adults. CASE PRESENTATION: We report one pediatric case of COVID-19. A 14-month-old boy was admitted to the hospital with a symptom of fever, and was diagnosed with a mild form of COVID-19. The child's mother and grandmother also tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 RNA. However, the lymphocyte counts were normal. The chest computed tomography (CT) revealed scattered ground glass opacities in the right lower lobe close to the pleura and resorption after the treatment. The patient continued to test positive for SARS-CoV-2 RNA in the nasopharyngeal swabs and stool at 17 days after the disappearance of symptoms. CONCLUSION: The present pediatric case of COVID-19 was acquired through household transmission, and the symptoms were mild. Lymphocyte counts did not significantly decrease. The RNA of SARS-CoV-2 in stool and nasopharyngeal swabs remained positive for an extended period of time after the disappearance of symptoms. This suggests that attention should be given to the potential contagiousness of pediatric COVID-19 cases after clinical recovery.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus , Feces/virology , Fever/etiology , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Nasopharynx/virology , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnostic imaging , Adult , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , Clinical Laboratory Techniques , Coronavirus/genetics , Coronavirus/isolation & purification , Coronavirus Infections/diagnostic imaging , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Family Characteristics , Humans , Infant , Lymphocyte Count , Male , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Polymerase Chain Reaction , SARS-CoV-2 , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/transmission , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
4.
Biosci Trends ; 14(3): 222-226, 2020 Jul 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-100190

ABSTRACT

The new coronavirus (COVID-19) has been characterized as a world pandemic by WHO since March 11, 2020. Although it is likely that COVID-19 transmission is primarily via droplets and close contact, airborne transmission and fecal-oral route remains a possibility. The medical staff working in the operating room, such as anesthesiologists, surgeons and nurses, are at high risk of exposure to virus due to closely contacting patients. The perioperative management is under great challenge while performing surgeries for patients suffering COVID-19, including emergency cesarean section, which is one of the most common surgeries under such circumstances. How to prevent medical staff from cross-infection is an issue of great concern. In this article, we give a practice of anesthesia scenario design for emergency cesarean section in a supposed standard patient suffering COVID-19, aimed to optimize the work flow and implement the protective details through simulation of a real operation scenario, which may be useful for training and clinical practice of anesthesia management for patients suffering COVID-19 or other fulminating infectious diseases.


Subject(s)
Anesthesia , Cesarean Section , Coronavirus Infections , Infection Control/methods , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Emergency Treatment , Female , Humans , Pregnancy , SARS-CoV-2
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