Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 8 de 8
Filter
1.
Sustainability ; 14(7):4274, 2022.
Article in English | MDPI | ID: covidwho-1776338

ABSTRACT

Art appreciation is an effective way to promote artistic literacy and is also an important component of aesthetic education in school. With the help of information and communication technology, the authors organized open practice teaching for students to learn art appreciation outside school. During the COVID-19 epidemic, local art appreciation education could not be carried out in the city where the authors' school is located. With the support of mobile positioning technology and information platforms, students were able to carry out 32 art appreciation activities in their hometowns during this period. Through the mobile positioning information submitted by students, feedback questionnaires, after-view data, and other data, learning achievements were identified. A correlation analysis of the data submitted by the students on the information platform confirmed that satisfaction with the art appreciation activity directly affected their interest in art. The correlation reached 0.78. Satisfaction was strongly correlated with psychological expectations (0.67) and art information obtained in the early stage (0.61). The authors propose that using information and communication technology to carry out art appreciation education outside the school is the way to promote the sustainable development of aesthetic education in school.

2.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-309643

ABSTRACT

Background: To share our experiences of resumption of the treatment for gynecologic patients after lifting lockdown in a hotspot area of the Corona Virus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)pandemic. Methods: The triage process used to resume the medical activities for gynecologic patients at the Wuhan Union Hospital after a 76-day lockdown of the city is described and its effectiveness to avoid COVID-19 nosocomial transmission is shown. Results: The non-emergency patients are pre-triaged by contact history and body temperature at outpatient clinic and negative COVID-19 screening tests are required for an admissionin the buffering rooms at the gynecologic department. The buffering lastsfor at least three days for symptom monitoring and a second round of COVID-19 tests before they can be transferred to the regular gynecologic wards. For patients who need emergency surgery, the first screening should be completed at the quarantine wards after the surgery, followed by buffering at the gynecologic department. We received 19298 outpatient visits, admitted 326 patients, and performed 223 operations in the first two months after the lockdown was lifted, andno single COVID-19 case occurredin the hospitalized patients while the proportion of potentially high-risk patients with cancer and severe anemia were increased in comparison with the same period in 2019 and the latest two months before the lockdown. Conclusions: We provide an effective triage system with buffering at two levels to guarantee safe and timely treatment for non-COVID-19 gynecologic patients in a post-lockdown phase.

3.
J Obstet Gynaecol Res ; 47(9): 3297-3302, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1331736

ABSTRACT

AIM: To share our experiences of resuming the treatments for gynecologic patients after lifting the lockdown in a hotspot area for the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. METHODS: The triage process used to resume medical activities for gynecologic patients at the Wuhan Union Hospital after a 76-day lockdown of the city is described, and its effectiveness in preventing COVID-19 nosocomial transmission is shown. RESULTS: Nonemergency patients were pretriaged based on their contact history and body temperature at an outpatient clinic, and negative COVID-19 screening test results were required for admission to the buffering rooms at the gynecologic department. The buffering lasted at least 3 days for symptom monitoring, and a second round of COVID-19 testing was required before patients could be transferred to the regular gynecologic wards. For patients who needed emergency surgery, the first screening was completed at the isolation wards after surgery, followed by buffering at the gynecologic department. We received 19 298 outpatient visits, admitted 326 patients, and performed 223 operations in the first 2 months after the lockdown was lifted. No COVID-19 cases occurred in the hospitalized patients, while the proportion of potentially high-risk patients with cancer and severe anemia was increased in comparison to that observed during the same period in 2019 and the first 2 months of 2020 before the lockdown. CONCLUSIONS: We provide an effective triage system with buffering at two levels to guarantee safe and timely treatment for non-COVID-19 gynecologic patients in the postlockdown phase.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Triage , COVID-19 Testing , Communicable Disease Control , Female , Humans , Lifting , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Nat Metab ; 3(7): 909-922, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1279905

ABSTRACT

Exosomes represent a subtype of extracellular vesicle that is released through retrograde transport and fusion of multivesicular bodies with the plasma membrane1. Although no perfect methodologies currently exist for the high-throughput, unbiased isolation of pure plasma exosomes2,3, investigation of exosome-enriched plasma fractions of extracellular vesicles can confer a glimpse into the endocytic pathway on a systems level. Here we conduct high-coverage lipidomics with an emphasis on sterols and oxysterols, and proteomic analyses of exosome-enriched extracellular vesicles (EVs hereafter) from patients at different temporal stages of COVID-19, including the presymptomatic, hyperinflammatory, resolution and convalescent phases. Our study highlights dysregulated raft lipid metabolism that underlies changes in EV lipid membrane anisotropy that alter the exosomal localization of presenilin-1 (PS-1) in the hyperinflammatory phase. We also show in vitro that EVs from different temporal phases trigger distinct metabolic and transcriptional responses in recipient cells, including in alveolar epithelial cells, which denote the primary site of infection, and liver hepatocytes, which represent a distal secondary site. In comparison to the hyperinflammatory phase, EVs from the resolution phase induce opposing effects on eukaryotic translation and Notch signalling. Our results provide insights into cellular lipid metabolism and inter-tissue crosstalk at different stages of COVID-19 and are a resource to increase our understanding of metabolic dysregulation in COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Extracellular Vesicles/metabolism , Lipidomics , Metabolomics , SARS-CoV-2 , Biological Transport , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cell Fractionation , Cell Membrane/metabolism , Chemical Fractionation , Cluster Analysis , Computational Biology/methods , Exosomes/metabolism , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Lipidomics/methods , Metabolome , Metabolomics/methods , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology
5.
Am J Obstet Gynecol ; 223(1): 3-8, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-634523

ABSTRACT

Since December 2019, the outbreak of novel coronavirus disease 2019 became a major epidemic threat in China and later spread worldwide. During the coronavirus disease 2019 outbreak in mainland China, the Chinese Obstetricians and Gynecologists Association distributed guidelines regarding the care of gynecologic patients. These guidelines were developed by the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the Peking Union Medical College Hospital and represent an effort to integrate infection control strategy and promote professionalism in medical practice. The guidelines represent collaboration with experts from 31 provinces and autonomous regions of mainland China over 2 weeks' time. With the implementation of these guidelines, no nosocomial infections of coronavirus disease 2019 have been identified at the Peking Union Medical College Hospital. We think these guidelines might be helpful to departments of obstetrics and gynecology internationally during these unprecedented times. In our guidelines, we describe basic infection precaution principles, an epidemiologic screening tool, prioritization of surgical procedures, and operating room requirements. Using these principles, we then review the management of gynecologic patients during the coronavirus disease 2019 epidemic in the outpatient and operative and nonoperative inpatient settings and in clinical trials.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Gynecology/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , China , Clinical Trials as Topic , Consensus , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Female , Gynecologic Surgical Procedures , Hospitals , Humans , Infection Control , Operating Rooms/standards , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pregnancy , SARS-CoV-2
6.
Cell Metab ; 32(2): 188-202.e5, 2020 08 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-612608

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic presents an unprecedented threat to global public health. Herein, we utilized a combination of targeted and untargeted tandem mass spectrometry to analyze the plasma lipidome and metabolome in mild, moderate, and severe COVID-19 patients and healthy controls. A panel of 10 plasma metabolites effectively distinguished COVID-19 patients from healthy controls (AUC = 0.975). Plasma lipidome of COVID-19 resembled that of monosialodihexosyl ganglioside (GM3)-enriched exosomes, with enhanced levels of sphingomyelins (SMs) and GM3s, and reduced diacylglycerols (DAGs). Systems evaluation of metabolic dysregulation in COVID-19 was performed using multiscale embedded differential correlation network analyses. Using exosomes isolated from the same cohort, we demonstrated that exosomes of COVID-19 patients with elevating disease severity were increasingly enriched in GM3s. Our work suggests that GM3-enriched exosomes may partake in pathological processes related to COVID-19 pathogenesis and presents the largest repository on the plasma lipidome and metabolome distinct to COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/blood , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Exosomes/metabolism , G(M3) Ganglioside/blood , Gangliosides/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Adult , Aged , Betacoronavirus , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/pathology , COVID-19 , Diglycerides/blood , Female , Humans , Male , Metabolome/physiology , Metabolomics/methods , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Sphingomyelins/blood , Tandem Mass Spectrometry , Young Adult
8.
Oncologist ; 25(6): e982-e985, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-38316

ABSTRACT

From a large medical center in Wuhan, the epicenter of the 2019 novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19), we report clinical features and prognosis for three women diagnosed with COVID-19 after gynecologic oncology surgery and hospitalized in January 2020. The incidence of COVID-19 was 0.77% (3 of 389) of total hospitalizations and 1.59% (3 of 189) of patients undergoing surgeries in the ward. The infection of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 may be related to the older age, comorbidities, malignant tumor, and surgery in gynecologic hospitalizations. By February 20, 2020, only two of the three patients had met the clinical discharge criteria. Given the long and uncertain incubation period of COVID-19, screening for the virus infection should be carried out for all patients, both preoperatively and postoperatively. Postponement of scheduled gynecologic surgery for patients in the epidemic area should be considered.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Genital Neoplasms, Female/surgery , Gynecologic Surgical Procedures/adverse effects , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Postoperative Complications/diagnosis , Adult , COVID-19 , China/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Female , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Incidence , Male , Mass Screening/standards , Medical Records/statistics & numerical data , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Postoperative Complications/epidemiology , Postoperative Complications/virology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL