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1.
Atmospheric Measurement Techniques ; 14(6):4507-4516, 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1278653

ABSTRACT

Ambient aerosol size distributions obtained with a compact scanning mobility analyzer, the “Spider” differential mobility analyzer (DMA), are compared to those obtained with a conventional mobility analyzer, with specific attention to the effect of mobility resolution on the measured size distribution parameters. The Spider is a 12 cm diameter radial differential mobility analyzer that spans the 10–500 nm size range with 30 s mobility scans. It achieves its compact size by operating at a nominal mobility resolution R=3 (sheath flow = 0.9 L min-1;aerosol flow = 0.3 L min-1) in place of the higher ratio of sheath flow to aerosol flow commonly used. The question addressed here is whether the lower resolution is sufficient to capture key characteristics of ambient aerosol size distributions. The Spider, operated at R=3 with 30 s up- and downscans, was co-located with a TSI 3081 long-column mobility analyzer, operated at R=10 with a 360 s sampling duty cycle. Ambient aerosol data were collected over 26 consecutive days of continuous operation, in Pasadena, CA. Over the 17–500 nm size range, the two instruments exhibit excellent correlation in the total particle number concentrations and geometric mean diameters, with regression slopes of 1.13 and 1.00, respectively. Our results suggest that particle sizing at a lower resolution than typically employed may be sufficient to obtain key properties of ambient size distributions, at least for these two moments of the size distribution. Moreover, it enables better counting statistics, as the wider transfer function for a given aerosol flow rate results in a higher counting rate.

2.
Geophys Res Lett ; 48(3): e2020GL091699, 2021 Feb 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1127134

ABSTRACT

The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic led to a widespread reduction in aerosol emissions. Using satellite observations and climate model simulations, we study the underlying mechanisms of the large decreases in solar clear-sky reflection (3.8 W m-2 or 7%) and aerosol optical depth (0.16 W m-2 or 32%) observed over the East Asian Marginal Seas in March 2020. By separating the impacts from meteorology and emissions in the model simulations, we find that about one-third of the clear-sky anomalies can be attributed to pandemic-related emission reductions, and the rest to weather variability and long-term emission trends. The model is skillful at reproducing the observed interannual variations in solar all-sky reflection, but no COVID-19 signal is discerned. The current observational and modeling capabilities will be critical for monitoring, understanding, and predicting the radiative forcing and climate impacts of the ongoing crisis.

3.
Geophys Res Lett ; 48(3): e2020GL091699, 2021 Feb 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1003291

ABSTRACT

The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic led to a widespread reduction in aerosol emissions. Using satellite observations and climate model simulations, we study the underlying mechanisms of the large decreases in solar clear-sky reflection (3.8 W m-2 or 7%) and aerosol optical depth (0.16 W m-2 or 32%) observed over the East Asian Marginal Seas in March 2020. By separating the impacts from meteorology and emissions in the model simulations, we find that about one-third of the clear-sky anomalies can be attributed to pandemic-related emission reductions, and the rest to weather variability and long-term emission trends. The model is skillful at reproducing the observed interannual variations in solar all-sky reflection, but no COVID-19 signal is discerned. The current observational and modeling capabilities will be critical for monitoring, understanding, and predicting the radiative forcing and climate impacts of the ongoing crisis.

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