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1.
Developments in Marketing Science: Proceedings of the Academy of Marketing Science ; : 167-168, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1930273

ABSTRACT

Amid skyrocketing costs and student debt, much has been written about the increasing skepticism of whether a traditional four-year degree is “worth it.” The general consensus among outlets such as Forbes, The WSJ, and CNBC (each citing recent polls) is that families’ attitudes toward higher education is changing, due to sharply rising costs. This change does not favor traditional college degree programs. In the midst of this transformation, branded digital marketing certificates have presented themselves as a more economical alternative. Perhaps the most worrisome of which are the recently announced “Google Career Certificates,” which are six-month programs geared to prepare workers for the digital economy. Google leadership states these new certificates are meant to be the equivalent of a four-year degree given that “college degrees are out of reach for many Americans, and you shouldn’t need a college diploma to have economic security.” The purpose of this panel session is to discuss what the traditional marketing degree program response should be to the changing perceptions of value and increased competition. The potential consequences of Google entering higher education have been further exacerbated by impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic. Disruption that many thought leaders have been talking about for years was accelerated in the span of a few months. The result was a wave of student questions and criticism of the value of online education directed against even the most renowned institutions. While pandemic-related impacts to teaching modality may not be long-term, it will likely take much longer for student sentiment to recover. Evidenced by over seventy lawsuits currently pending against colleges and universities, this confluence of factors should not be ignored. Rather, we need to view this as an opportunity for existential reflection on the most basic of marketing principles as they apply to higher education as a marketable service. As such, in this panel session, the following questions will be addressed by a diverse group of stakeholders: Will industry and prospective students/families accept these certificates as a substitute to a traditional degree? How should traditional marketing degree programs adapt or change program offerings to be more competitive/appealing? What is academia’s value proposition? How do we communicate this effectively with prospective students and their families? How do we train students on technologies many professors have never themselves used? Are there opportunities for public/private collaboration that provide technical skills, produce job-ready graduates, and lower costs? What could these look like? Student, industry, and academic representatives will discuss these questions and engage the audience in a lively conversation about the future of marketing education and the changing role of marketing academics. © 2022, The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Switzerland AG.

2.
Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine ; 10(5 SUPPL 2), 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1916579

ABSTRACT

Background: Since April 2020, some high schools were closed to in-person teaching, and interscholastic and club sports were cancelled in an attempt to slow the spread of COVID- 19. While some US adolescents participated in sports since April 2020, other US adolescents did not participate in sports during this time. It is unknown what effect sport participation has had on the health of adolescents. Hypothesis/Purpose: To identify how sport participation during the COVID-19 pandemic impacted the health of adolescents. Methods: Adolescents across the US were recruited via social media to complete an online survey in the spring of 2021. Participants were asked to report their demographics (age, gender, race), whether they participated in school club or school sports since May 2020, type of school they attended (in-person, online, hybrid), and measures of mental health (MH), physical activity (PA) and quality of life (QoL). Assessments included the: General Anxiety Disorder-7 Item (GAD-7) for anxiety, Patient Health Questionnaire-9 Item (PHQ-9) for depression, Pediatric Functional Activity Brief Scale (PFABS) for physical activity, and Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory 4.0 (PedsQL) for quality of life. Assessment scores were compared for respondents who participated in sports (PAR) with those that did not participate in sports (NoPAR). Univariable comparisons between the groups were made via ttests or chi-square tests while means for continuous outcome measures were compared between the groups by ANOVA models that controlled for age, gender, race and the type of school attendance. Results: 4,693 adolescents (52% female, Age = 16.1+1.3 yrs., grades 9-12) from 38 states participated in the study with PAR = 4,286 (91%) and NoPAR = 407 (9%). NoPAR participants reported a higher prevalence of moderate to severe levels of anxiety (29.3% vs 21.3%, p<0.001) and depression (40.7% vs 19.8%, p<0.001). NoPAR participants reported lower (worse) PFABS scores (mean 13.2 [95%CI 12.4, 13.9] vs 21.2 [20.7, 21.6] p<0.001) and lower (worse) PedsQL total scores compared to the PAR group (77.9 [76.5, 79.3] vs. 83.2 [82.3, 84.1], p<0.001). Conclusions: Adolescents who did not play a sport during the COVID-19 pandemic reported significantly higher levels of anxiety and depression, as well as lower physical activity and quality of life scores compared to adolescents who did play a school or club sport. Participation in organized sports may offer an important opportunity to improve physical activity and mental health for adolescents during and after the COVID-19 pandemic.

3.
British Journal of Surgery ; 108(SUPPL 7):vii50, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1585070

ABSTRACT

Aims: The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in an unprecedented challenge. With the abolition of all non-urgent endoscopies nationwide, there has been concerning implications on colorectal cancer (CRC) diagnosis. Rationing of these scarce colonoscopy slots has become a priority. Faecal immunohistochemistry test (FIT) results are predictive of bowel pathology. Here we audit the clinical outcomes of patients that have undergone FIT in our health board in the pre and COVID-19 era. Methods: Using business intelligence methods, an automated system for NHS eHealth data collection has been established. All patients who have undergone FIT testing are audited for clinical outcomes including investigation and pathology. Results from December 2018-2019 (pre- COVID) were compared to December 2019-January 2021 (COVID). Results: There was a 70.12% increase in FIT uptake. 58.88% were female. Median age 73 (range 1-100). FIT results are compared below. Conclusion: Our business intelligence approach has improved uptake of FIT in our community. There have been proportionally higher rates of colorectal cancer diagnosis with less resources. FIT specificity is 98.64% and therefore should be further widely accepted to ration resources.

4.
Osteopathic Family Physician ; 12(5):30-32, 2020.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1573129

ABSTRACT

Direct-to-consumer care (DTC) is a popular subset of telemedicine ideal for delivering large volumes of health care during a pandemic or other public health crisis conditions. DTC has the potential to relieve the burden of health care shortages and improve patient safety and outcomes during widespread disease. Below is a brief discussion exploring perspectives and evidence for DTC as a business modality, including the advantages and disadvantages of using DTC for providing health care during a pandemic.

7.
The Face Mask In COVID Times: A Sociomaterial Analysis ; : 1-102, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1463335

ABSTRACT

The simple fabric face mask is a key agent in the fight against the global spread of COVID-19. However, beyond its role as a protective covering against coronavirus infection, the face mask is the bearer of powerful symbolic and political power and arouses intense emotions. Adopting an international perspective informed by social theory, The Face Mask in COVID Times: A Sociomaterial Analysis offers an intriguing and original investigation of the social, cultural and historical dimensions of face-masking as a practice in the age of COVID. Rather than Beck's 'risk society', we are now living in a 'COVID society', the long-term effects of which have yet to be experienced or imagined. Everything has changed. The COVID crisis has generated novel forms of sociality and new ways of living and moving through space and time. In this new world, the face mask has become a significant object, positioned as one of the key ways people can protect themselves and others from infection with the coronavirus. The face mask is rich with symbolic meaning as well as practical value. In the words of theorist Jane Bennett, the face mask has acquired a new 'thing-power' as it is coming together with human bodies in these times of uncertainty, illness and death. The role of the face mask in COVID times has been the subject of debate and dissension, arousing strong feelings. The historical and cultural contexts in which face masks against COVID contagion are worn (or not worn) are important to consider. In some countries, such as Japan and other East Asian nations, face mask wearing has a long tradition. Full or partial facial coverings, such as veiling, is common practice in regions such as the Middle East. In many other countries, including most countries in the Global North, most people, beyond health care workers, have little or no experience of face masks. They have had to learn how to make sense of face masking as a protective practice and how to incorporate face masks into their everyday practices and routines. Face masking practices have become highly political. The USA has witnessed protests against face mask wearing that rest on 'sovereign individualism', a notion which is highly specific to the contemporary political climate in that country. Face masks have also been worn to make political statements: bearing anti-racist statements, for example, but also Trump campaign support. Meanwhile, celebrities and influencers have sought to advocate for face mask wearing as part of their branding, while art makers, museums, designers and novelty fashion manufacturers have identified the opportunity to profit from this sudden new market. Face masks have become a fashion item as well as a medical device: both a way of signifying the wearer's individuality and beliefs and their ethical stance in relation to the need to protect their own and others' health. The Face Mask in COVID Times: A Sociomaterial Analysis provides a short and accessible analysis of the sociomaterial dimensions of the face mask in the age of COVID-19. The book presents seven short chapters and an epilogue. We bring together sociomaterial theoretical perspectives with compelling examples from public health advice and campaigns, anti-mask activism as well as popular culture (news reports, blog posts, videos, online shopping sites, art works) to illustrate our theoretical points, and use Images to support our analysis. Short and accessible analysis of the sociomaterial dimensions of the face mask in the age of COVID-19 Examples from public health advice and campaigns, anti-mask activism, and popular culture The ideal primer for HSS uni courses focusing on COVID-19 © 2021 Walter de Gruyter GmbH, Berlin/Boston. All rights reserved.

8.
Proceedings of the ACM on Interactive, Mobile, Wearable and Ubiquitous Technologies ; 5(3), 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1438130

ABSTRACT

For the past several decades, machine learning has played an important role in sports science with regard to player performance and result prediction. However, it is still challenging to quantify team-level game performance because there is no strong ground truth. Thus, a team cannot receive feedback in a standardized way. The aim of this study was twofold. First, we designed a metric called LAX-Score to quantify a collegiate lacrosse team's athletic performance. Next, we explored the relationship between our proposed metric and practice sensing features for performance enhancement. To derive the metric, we utilized feature selection and weighted regression. Then, the proposed metric was statistically validated on over 700 games from the last three seasons of NCAA Division I women's lacrosse. We also explored our biometric sensing dataset obtained from a collegiate team's athletes over the course of a season. We then identified the practice features that are most correlated with high-performance games. Our results indicate that LAX-Score provides insight into athletic performance beyond wins and losses. Moreover, though COVID-19 has stalled implementation, the collegiate team studied applied our feature outcomes to their practices, and the initial results look promising with regard to better performance. © 2021 ACM.

9.
Colorectal Disease ; n/a(n/a), 2021.
Article in English | Wiley | ID: covidwho-1408736

ABSTRACT

Abstract The COVID-19 pandemic has led to a reduced colonoscopy capacity in the UK resulting in increased waiting times for investigation. To increase diagnostic capacity and reduce the risk of diagnostic delay, CT colonography (CTC) and colon capsule endoscopy (CCE) are increasingly being relied upon. Endoscopic assessment and treatment will be required for those patients with large colonic polyps or malignant tumours detected by CTC or CCE, provided they are fit enough to undergo further investigation. The management of patients with intermediate (6-9mm) and diminutive (<6mm) colonic polyps, reported by CTC and CCE, will increasingly be decided by clinicians. Published literature suggests the risk of progression to malignancy of intermediate or diminutive polyps over 3 years is low. Furthermore, the risk of intermediate or diminutive polyps harbouring malignancy is extremely low. The benefits, and timeline, for the removal of these polyps must be carefully considered for patients. We present a pragmatic approach to managing intermediate and diminutive polyps. We suggest delayed polypectomy (up to one year) for patients with intermediate polyps who are likely to benefit. For those patients with diminutive polyps, we advocate further surveillance only for younger patients where clinical concern exists. This meets the aspirations of Realistic Medicine, providing a risk-based approach for patients, while appropriately prioritising resources.

10.
American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine ; 203(9):1, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1407052
11.
JACCP Journal of the American College of Clinical Pharmacy ; 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1287364

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Data specific to pharmacists' value in patient-provided clinical services in New York are limited due to their scope of practice restrictions. However, due to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, there has been an expansion of telehealth and allowance for billable services for pharmacists. Objectives: The objective of this study was to complete a retrospective review to assess reimbursement of clinical services provided by pharmacists via telehealth during the pandemic in a primary care setting. Methods: A report was generated which identified patients 18 years and older, who were provided services by pharmacists within a primary care group via telehealth during March to July 2020 in New York. It identified patients with an appointment type code of “PharmD Telemed 30” or “PharmD TM Follow UP 15,” including Medicare Annual Wellness Visits or AWVs (G0438-G0439) with procedural codes, and incident-to CPT codes (99211-99214). Information received included medical record number, name, date of birth, carrier plan name, billed procedure code and description, carrier payment amount, and patient responsible amount. Results: A total of 485 patients were provided services during the timeframe. There were 223 encounters billed for the 99 211 CPT code, 156 of which received payment from insurers with an average of $20.14. For initial and subsequent AWVs there were a total of 48 and 150 encounters, respectively, billed by the pharmacists. Forty-one of the encounters billed as a G0438 received payment from insurers with an average of $175.75. One hundred thirty-three of the encounters billed as a G0439 received payment from insurers with an average payment of $114.09. Conclusion: The results of this study provided insight into whether specific services or insurances should be targeted for payment of services. Expansion of these services could show improvement in patient care and can assist in gathering outcomes to better support pharmacists gaining provider status on the state and national level.

12.
American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine ; 203(9), 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1277348

ABSTRACT

RATIONALE: Communities of color are bearing a disproportionate burden of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) morbidity and mortality. Social determinants of health have resulted in higher prevalence and severity of COVID-19 among minority groups. Published work on COVID-19 disparities has focused on higher transmission, hospitalization, and mortality risk among people of color, but studies on disparities in the post-acute care setting are scarce. Our aim was to identify socioeconomic disparities in health resource utilization after hospital discharge. METHODS: This was a retrospective study. We identified adult patients who were hospitalized at CUIMC or the Allen Hospital from March 1st through April 30th 2020, had a positive RT-PCR for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-COV-2), developed severe hypoxemic respiratory failure requiring invasive mechanical ventilation, and were successfully discharged from the hospital without need for ventilator support. Patients who received a tracheostomy and were weaned off the ventilator prior to discharge were included. Exclusion criteria included transfer from or to another institution, prior tracheostomy, in-hospital death, and discharge with a ventilator. RESULTS: We identified 195 patients meeting inclusion criteria. The median age was 59 (IQR 47-67), and 135 (66.5%) were men. There were 25 (12.8%) patients who were uninsured and 116 (59.5%) patients who had public insurance. There were 121 (62%) Hispanic, 34 (17%) Black, and 18 (9%) White patients. Uninsured patients within our cohort were more likely to be Hispanic and Spanish-speaking (p=0.027;p<0.001, respectively). Uninsured patients were also more likely to be discharged to home (p<0.001) than to a rehabilitation facility. 8.8% of patients were readmitted to CUIMC within 30 days and 41.5% saw a medical provider at CUIMC within 30 days of discharge. Insurance status did not predict 30-day re-hospitalization or completion of outpatient follow-up, although our study was underpowered to answer these questions. CONCLUSION: Our study demonstrated that race/ethnicity and primary language are associated with insurance status with Hispanic and Spanish-speaking patients being more likely to be uninsured. Uninsured patients were more likely to be discharged home after hospitalization, rather than to facility for further care and rehabilitation. We did not demonstrate any short-term differences in 30-day re-hospitalization rates or follow-up visits but we suspect socioeconomic disparities represent a significant barrier to adequate follow-up care in the long term. We plan to investigate this further with longitudinal follow-up and survey data.

13.
Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation ; 40(4):S142-S142, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1187458
14.
Biochemist ; 42(6):12-15, 2020.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1010065

ABSTRACT

It's something so many in global healthcare expected, even prepared for, yet the sheer scale and complexity of the COVID-19 pandemic has left us awestruck. Lives have been lost, economies have suffered, countries have locked down but, as yet, no cure has been found. We need to find an antidote and we need to do so quickly. One solution may lie in ultra-personalized genetic medicine — in this case, medicine that can be quickly designed to specifically target SARS-CoV-2, the novel virus that causes COVID. © 2020. All Rights Reserved.

15.
Clinical Cancer Research ; 26(18 SUPPL), 2020.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-992046

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The need to rapidly collect, integrate, and share data on COVID-19 patients with cancer at scale hasgiven rise to multiple internal and cross-institutional research registries. These registries support use cases thatrequire data at different levels of granularity and are built using mixed standards. Ensuring semantic interoperabilityand quality of this data is critical for generating reliable and reproducible evidence. At MSK, we created a frameworkthat enabled the rapid development of semantically compatible COVID and cancer registries and data exchange. Background: Handling and harmonizing real-world data for COVID and cancer research presented with typicalchallenges: maintenance of complex patient cohorts;reconciling different levels of temporal and semanticgranularity;supporting crosswalks between different representations without information loss;and sharing itinternally and with research consortia. Solving these challenges for COVID and cancer studies necessitatedadvanced infrastructure and harmonization solutions. Methods: We used MSK Extract, our research platform, to create an integrated COVID and cancer data researchframework. It included a library of reusable standardized REDCap used in multiple RedCap instances supportingindividual research studies;PostgreSQL database containing patient cohorts and data from Electronic HealthRecords (EHR) standardized to OMOP;and ETL pipelines. Our approach to the REDCap design and datamanagement allowed for combined sets of detailed, atomic, and aggregate-level data through a combination of abstraction, curation, and extraction of data from different sources. We developed reconciliation methodologybetween initial curation, available raw data, and the subsequent abstraction. We enforced consistent temporalconstraints on data extraction and curation. We used the OMOP vocabulary for semantic harmonization, mappingmetadata from internal and external registries to OMOP concepts. We linked procedure and medication codes tohigh-level treatment groups leveraging classifications available in the OMOP vocabulary. Results: Our approach to the REDCap design supported various analytical use cases and enabled data sharingbetween different investigators and registries. Reuse of the data that was previously abstracted complemented withthe data extracted from EHR allowed investigators and their teams to quickly review, validate, and update the priorcuration. Explicit temporal constraints supported alignment between different registries. Using the OMOP standardsand high-level treatment classifications supported data conversion between various registries and integration of thedata collected via REDCap and sourced from EHR. Conclusion: Using real-world data for observational COVID and cancer research presented us with opportunities toimprove and mature our evolving research infrastructure and better support internal and distributed research, andhighlighted the need for uniform data standards in the cancer domain.

16.
Colorectal Dis ; 22(9): 1195, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-825788
17.
Colorectal Dis ; 22(6): 621-624, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-245488

ABSTRACT

AIM: The coronavirus pandemic has led to significant challenges for healthcare delivery across the globe. Non-emergency endoscopic activity in the UK has been postponed, raising concerns of increased delays in the diagnosis of colorectal cancer and a surge in demand once services resume. Measures to mitigate this risk must be considered. METHOD: This paper reviews various investigative modalities for colorectal disease which could be deployed during cessation of colonoscopy services. We focus on colon capsule endoscopy (CCE) due to its relevance during the COVID-19 pandemic and its ability to triage patients effectively to further endoscopic investigations. RESULTS: CT of the abdomen and pelvis has been suggested as a triage tool while access to colonoscopy is limited. However, CT may lead to the spread of COVID-19 as patients attend the hospital, and it exposes them to the risks of radiation. Faecal immunochemistry tests have been demonstrated as a good predictor of colonic pathology and could be safely used to risk stratify patients when prioritizing colonoscopy. CCE is a safe and innovative technology for investigating the colon. Procedures can be carried out in the community and can be conducted safely during the coronavirus pandemic. It has been shown to be an accurate detector of colonic neoplasia and can reduce demand for colonoscopy. CONCLUSION: As colonoscopy services resume, they will probably experience high demand leading to further delays for patients. CCE could be used to reduce the number of patients requiring colonoscopy and triage those requiring further endoscopic investigations appropriately.


Subject(s)
Capsule Endoscopy/methods , Colorectal Neoplasms/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Triage/methods , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Colonoscopy/methods , Humans , Immunochemistry/methods , Occult Blood , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
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