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1.
EuropePMC;
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-328959

ABSTRACT

Does geographic variation in personality across the United States relate to COVID-19 vaccination rates? To answer this question, we combined three state-level datasets: (a) Big Five personality averages (Rentfrow et al., 2008), (b) COVID-19 vaccination rates for those receiving at least one does and fully vaccinated people (CDC, 2021a), and (c) health-relevant covariates (population density, per capita GDP, and racial/ethnic data;Webster et al., 2021). Correlations showed openness as the strongest predictor of both one-dose (r = .50) and fully-vaccinated (r = .51) rates. Controlling for other traits, covariates, and spatial dependence, openness remained a significant predictor of both one-dose (rp = .33) and fully-vaccinated (rp = .55) rates. We suspect that states with higher average openness scores are more conducive to novel thinking and behavior—dispositions that may be crucial in motivating people to take new vaccines based on new technologies to confront a novel coronavirus.

2.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-323862

ABSTRACT

Do geographic differences in collectivism relate to COVID-19 case and death rates? And if so, would they also replicate across states within arguably the most individualistic country in the world—the United States? Further still, what role might the U.S.’s history of ethnic strife and race-based health disparities play in either reinforcing or undermining state-level relations between collectivism and COVID-19 rates? To answer these questions, we examined archival data from 98 countries (Study 1) and the 48 contiguous United States (Study 2) on country/state-level collectivism, COVID-19 case/death rates, relevant covariates (per-capita GDP, population density, spatial dependence), and in the U.S., percent of non-Whites. In Study 1, country-level collectivism negatively related to both cases (r = -.28) and deaths (r = -.40) in simple regressions;however, after controlling for covariates, the former became non-significant (rp = -.07), but the latter remained significant (rp = -.20). In Study 2, state-level collectivism positively related to both cases (r = .56) and deaths (r = .41) in simple regressions, and these relationships persisted after controlling for all covariates except race, where a state’s non-White population dominated all other predictors of COVID-19 cases (rp = .35) and deaths (rp = .31). We discuss the strong link between race and collectivism in U.S. culture, and its implications for understanding COVID-19 responses.

5.
J Cardiovasc Magn Reson ; 23(1): 86, 2021 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1292072

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Cardiac evaluations, including cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging and biomarker results, are needed in children during mid-term recovery after infection with SARS-CoV-2. The incidence of CMR abnormalities 1-3 months after recovery is over 50% in older adults and has ranged between 1 and 15% in college athletes. Abnormal cardiac biomarkers are common in adults, even during recovery. METHODS: We performed CMR imaging in a prospectively-recruited pediatric cohort recovered from COVID-19 and multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C). We obtained CMR data and serum biomarkers. We compared these results to age-matched control patients, imaged prior to the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic. RESULTS: CMR was performed in 17 children (13.9 years, all ≤ 18 years) and 29 age-matched control patients without SARS-CoV-2 infection. Cases were recruited with symptomatic COVID-19 (11/17, 65%) or MIS-C (6/17, 35%) and studied an average of 2 months after diagnosis. All COVID-19 patients had been symptomatic with fever (73%), vomiting/diarrhea (64%), or breathing difficulty (55%) during infection. Left ventricular and right ventricular ejection fractions were indistinguishable between cases and controls (p = 0.66 and 0.70, respectively). Mean native global T1, global T2 values and segmental T2 maximum values were also not statistically different from control patients (p ≥ 0.06 for each). NT-proBNP and troponin levels were normal in all children. CONCLUSIONS: Children prospectively recruited following SARS-CoV-2 infection had normal CMR and cardiac biomarker evaluations during mid-term recovery. Trial Registration Not applicable.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Heart/diagnostic imaging , Heart/physiology , Magnetic Resonance Imaging/methods , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/complications , Adolescent , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/blood , Child , Female , Humans , Male , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/blood
6.
BMJ Case Rep ; 14(4)2021 Apr 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1208383

ABSTRACT

A 9-day-old girl presented during the 2020 SARS-CoV-2 pandemic in wide-complex tachycardia with acute, symptomatic COVID-19 infection. Because the potential cardiac complications of COVID-19 were unknown at the time of her presentation, we chose to avoid the potential risks of haemodynamic collapse associated with afterload reduction from adenosine. Instead, a transoesophageal pacing catheter was placed. Supraventricular tachycardia (SVT) with an aberrated QRS morphology was diagnosed and the catheter was used to pace-terminate tachycardia. This presentation illustrates that the haemodynamic consequences of a concurrent infection with largely unknown neonatal sequelae present a potentially high-risk situation for pharmacologic conversion. Oesophageal cannulation can be used to diagnose and terminate infantile SVT.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Fever , Tachycardia, Supraventricular , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , Female , Fever/virology , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Tachycardia, Supraventricular/virology
7.
Personality and Individual Differences ; 178:110853, 2021.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-1144889

ABSTRACT

Do geographic differences in collectivism relate to COVID-19 case and death rates? And if so, would they also replicate across states within arguably the most individualistic country in the world—the United States? Further still, what role might the U.S.'s history of ethnic strife and race-based health disparities play in either reinforcing or undermining state-level relations between collectivism and COVID-19 rates? To answer these questions, we examined archival data from 98 countries (Study 1) and the 48 contiguous United States (Study 2) on country/state-level collectivism, COVID-19 case/death rates, relevant covariates (per-capita GDP, population density, spatial dependence), and in the U.S., percent of non-Whites. In Study 1, country-level collectivism negatively related to both cases (r = −0.28) and deaths (r = −0.40) in simple regressions;however, after controlling for covariates, the former became non-significant (rp = −0.07), but the latter remained significant (rp = −0.20). In Study 2, state-level collectivism positively related to both cases (r = 0.56) and deaths (r = 0.41) in simple regressions, and these relationships persisted after controlling for all covariates except race, where a state's non-White population dominated all other predictors of COVID-19 cases (rp = 0.35) and deaths (rp = 0.31). We discuss the strong link between race and collectivism in U.S. culture, and its implications for understanding COVID-19 responses.

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