Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 24
Filter
1.
The International Journal of Bank Marketing ; 40(5):937-938, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1878888

ABSTRACT

[...]it is likely that consumers' payment habits and social behavior, as well as society as a whole, will be drastically altered for the foreseeable future. Moving forward, we can underline at least three future research directions related to m-payment;(1) how to improve the effectiveness of m-payment rollout from the retailing, entertainment, financial services and marketing perspectives using different levels of grand and mid-range theories;(2) security, legal, regulatory, trust and privacy concerns in m-payment rollout in different contexts and levels and (3) business strategies, challenges and policies associated with m-payment implementation among the organizations. [...]we want to explicitly thank Professor Hooman Estelami, the Editor-in-Chief of the International Journal of Bank Marketing, for supporting this Special Issue topic and providing his invaluable suggestions throughout the process of this project.

2.
Plummer, Mark P.; Rait, Louise, Finnis, Mark E.; French, Craig J.; Bates Ccrn, Samantha, Douglas, James, Bhurani, Mansi, Broadley, Tessa, Trapani, Tony, Deane, Adam M.; Udy, Andrew A.; Burrell, Aidan J. C.; Burrell, Aidan, Cheng, Allen, Udy, Andrew, Palermo, Annamaria, Reddi, Benjamin, Reynolds, Claire, French, Craig, Cooper, D. James, Litton, Edward, Begum, Husna, Campbell, Lewis, Ramanan, Mahesh, Plummer, Mark, McAllister, Richard, Erickson, Simon, Broadley, Tessa, Trapani, Tony, Cheung, Winston, Sprint-Sari Australia Investigators, The, Visser, Adam, Mattke, Adrian, Regli, Adrian, Rashid, Alan, Tabah, Alexis, Walker, Alison, Cheng, Allen, Corley, Amanda, Udy, Andrew, Ramnani, Anil, Eidan, Anthony, DeKeulenaer, Bart, Reddi, Benjamin, Richards, Brent, Knott, Cameron, Moore, Cara, Delzoppo, Carmel, Boschert, Catherine, Tacon, Catherine, French, Craig, Austin, Danielle, Brewster, David, Cooper, David, Crosbie, David, Hawkins, David, Jessen, Edda, Martinez, Eduardo, Fysh, Edward, Litton, Edward, Oberender, Felix, McGain, Forbes, Salt, Gavin, Eastwood, Glenn, Taori, Gopal, White, Hayden, Buscher, Hergen, Seppelt, Ian, Leditschke, Isabel Anne, Young, Janelle, Lavana, Jayshree, Cohen, Jeremy, Lugsdin, Jessica, Botha, John, Santamaria, John, Barrett, Jonathan, Singh, Kasha, Laupland, Kevin, El-Khawas, Khaled, Estensen, Kristine, Deshpande, Kush, White, Kyle, Fitzpatrick, Leigh, Campbell, Lewis, Ramanan, Mahesh, Saxena, Manoj, Kainer, Marion, Kol, Mark, Page, Mark, Plummer, Mark, Sterba, Martin, Anstey, Matthew, Brain, Matthew, Maiden, Matthew, Kilminster, Myrene, Hammond, Naomi, Bhadange, Neeraj, Humphreys, Nicole, Jain, Paras, Azzi, Paul, Secombe, Paul, Lister, Paula, Chan, Peter, McCanny, Peter, Britton, Phillip, Janin, Pierre, Krishnamurthy, Ravi, Sonawane, Ravikiran, Tiruvoipati, Ravindranath, Totaro, Richard, Bellomo, Rinaldo, Sanghavi, Ritesh, Bates, Samantha, Peake, Sandra, Bihari, Shailesh, George, Shane, Erickson, Simon, Webb, Steve, Arora, Subhash, Ganu, Subodh, Rozen, Thomas, McKenna, Toni, Kadam, Umesh, Nayyar, Vineet, Choy, Wei Han, Albassam, Wisam, Data entry at the nested cohort, sites, Morgan, Rebecca, Prasad, Lalita, Carstens, Laloma, Bates, Samantha, Rait, Louise, Bhurani, Mansi.
Australian Critical Care ; 2022.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-1866894

ABSTRACT

Background Internationally, diabetes mellitus is recognized as a risk factor for severe COVID-19. The relationship between diabetes mellitus and severe COVID-19 has not been reported in the Australian population. Objectives To determine the prevalence of, and outcomes for patients with diabetes admitted to Australian intensive care units (ICUs) with COVID-19. Methods A nested cohort study of four ICUs in Melbourne participating in the the Short PeRiod IncideNce sTudy of Severe Acute Respiratory Infection (SPRINT-SARI) Australia project. All adult patients admitted to ICU with COVID-19 from 20 February 2020 to 27 February 2021 were included. Blood glucose and glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) data were retrospectively collected. Diabetes was diagnosed from medical history or a HbA1c ≥6.5% (48 mmol/mol). Hospital mortality was assessed using logistic regression. Results There were 136 patients with median age 58 years [48-68] and median APACHE II score of 14 [11-19]. 58 patients had diabetes (43%), 46 patients had stress induced hyperglycaemia (34%) and 32 patients had normoglycaemia (23%). Patients with diabetes were older, with higher APACHE II scores, had greater glycaemic variability than patients with normoglycaemia and longer hospital length of stay. Overall hospital mortality was 16% (22/136), including nine patients with diabetes, nine patients with stress induced hyperglycaemia and two patients with normoglycaemia. Conclusion Diabetes is prevalent in patients admitted to Australian ICUs with severe COVID-19 highlighting the need for prevention strategies in this vulnerable population.

4.
Medical science educator ; : 1-21, 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1824374

ABSTRACT

Healthcare education providers are eager to apply technologies in teaching and learning activities;however, students are the consumers in higher education, and their opinion and experience should be considered. We performed a meta-synthesis of qualitative studies to help inform our understanding of Southeast Asian healthcare students’ perceptions and experience of technology-based teaching and learning in their education. Our search strategy located 1599 articles from a dozen electronic research databases. Articles were analyzed for quality using the Hawker’s Evidence Appraisal Tool, and 23 qualitative studies were included in the final meta-synthesis. Technologies investigated largely involved online or blended learning, with fewer exploring virtual reality, simulations, telehealth, game-based learning, and videos. Three overarching themes were synthesized: (i) culture does matter in the implementation of technology-based learning;(ii) the values and limitations of technology used for learning;and (iii) technology is part of daily life and creates new challenges in education. Technology is an asset to enhance the learning experience, but educators must be aware of its limitations. Pre-coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) studies were more focused on technology and product, and were optimistically reported, whereas COVID-19–spanning studies focused on life experience and paid more attention to reporting on the inherent challenges. The educational approaches, theories, cultural aspects, and availability of facilities all play a vital role in steering successful technology use in learning.

5.
International Journal of Information Management ; 66:102520, 2022.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-1821284

ABSTRACT

This paper investigates the role of general cybersecurity and cybersecurity policy awareness in enhancing supply chain cyber resilience reactive capabilities. Theorizing from the Protection Motivation Theory, 200 Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs) were contacted to understand their perception of cybersecurity and policy awareness in affecting their overall cybersecurity hygiene. Data collection was carried out using a questionnaire survey and analysed via Partial Least Squares-based Structural Equation Modelling to validate the research framework. Results of analysis outlined the importance of general cybersecurity and policy awareness in shifting employees’ compliance attitude towards enhancing supply chain reactive capability. Using a mixed-method approach, post-survey interviews were further conducted with practitioners in SMEs to understand the study findings. The implications outlined in this study emphasises the importance of prioritising preventive measures and proper employee cyber hygiene to address the risk and loss following a cyber-attack. Key supply chain operational areas in SMEs are still largely supported by the human workforce serving as its backbone. An unwarranted attack could cause adverse business impacts. Thus, practitioners and SMEs would be alerted to the critical need for a robust security posture and that SMEs’ need of the hour lies at the core of its policy and employee cybersecurity hygiene.

6.
Germs ; 12(1):1-5, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1801717

ABSTRACT

The only factor statistically significantly associated with anxiety was job dedication, where a higher level of job dedication was associated with decreased likelihood of the worker having high levels of anxiety (odds ratio (OR)=0.545;95% confidence interval (CI): 0.301;0.990) (Table 1). [...]participation in the study was voluntary and 95% of our participants were females, which may indicate a self-selection bias. [...]being a cross-sectional survey, our research is only a snapshot in time. [...]we wish to highlight the need for advanced interventions in times of crisis to address mental-health concerns of employees and to safeguard their emotional and psychological wellbeing.

7.
BMC Psychol ; 10(1): 49, 2022 Mar 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1724574

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Medical schools throughout the world were forced to modify their programming during the COVID-19 pandemic. In Malaysia, virtual learning plans were implemented for non-clinical programming, while clinical posting modifications were designed to meet local SOPs. The prolonged enforcement of these modifications to undergraduate medical education will have affected student experiences, including well-being. Since these feelings can relate to perceived relatedness, autonomy, and competence, it is important to identify any potential factors that may lead to reduced intrinsic motivation in students. It is also important to consider how demographic features may contribute to student perspectives, which can be studied using the unique diversity represented by Malaysian students. METHODS: A quantitative survey was distributed to Malaysian medical students to assess their overall wellbeing, autonomy in educational decision making, student experiences, and position on changes to graduation timing. Intrinsic components were identified using Principal Component Analysis and were aligned with the three needs for self-determination, namely relatedness, autonomy, and competence. Finally, trends in responses for participants from various sub-populations were assessed using ANOVA testing. RESULTS: Responses were collected from 442 students representing 23 accredited Malaysian medical schools. Upon validation and reliability testing, eight components were identified with themes relating to: mental health, social concerns, communication, timing of modifications, depth of learning, and student-centred learning. Of these, gender was related to mental health, student-centred learning, and delayed graduation, while stage was related to student-centred learning and delayed graduation in addition to concerns about depth of learning and timing of modifications. Interestingly, ethnicity was related to differences in opinions about delayed graduation and income was related to social concerns. CONCLUSION: The results of this study indicate that, while students were satisfied in general with the content and delivery of their programmes given the circumstances, there is evidence to suggest negative effects on emotional wellbeing and expression of student voice, due to the modifications that were made. Additionally, these feelings related to the three motivational needs, suggesting that students were experiencing a dampened motivational profile during the pandemic. Further, motivational profiles were distinct between student sub-groups, providing insight for developing appropriate and inclusive accommodations moving forward.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Medical, Undergraduate , Students, Medical , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Clinical Competence , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/methods , Humans , Malaysia/epidemiology , Mental Health , Motivation , Pandemics , Personal Autonomy , Reproducibility of Results , SARS-CoV-2 , Students, Medical/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires
8.
Platelets ; 33(4): 531-535, 2022 May 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1707820

ABSTRACT

Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is a condition that is distinct from thrombosis with thrombocytopenia syndrome (TTS) that may also occur after coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccinations. Previous reports revealed an increased ITP incidence after ChAdOx1, a vaccine for COVID-19. Our study aimed to highlight the key features of ITP after COVID-19 vaccination. From April to October 2021, we collected data on 23 patients, including nine men and 14 women, with ITP from five hospitals across Taiwan who received either the ChAdOx1 or mRNA-1273 vaccine before development or exacerbation of ITP. Our findings revealed that both ChAdOx1 and mRNA-1273 vaccines were associated with ITP. Many patients responded well to steroids and immune suppressants, which may also suggest that the nature of thrombocytopenia is more like ITP rather than TTS. Lack of thrombosis, low D-dimer level, and negative anti-PF4 result could help to exclude TTS, which is also a rare but a far more lethal condition.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Purpura, Thrombocytopenic, Idiopathic , Thrombocytopenia , Thrombosis , Vaccines , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Female , Humans , Male , Purpura, Thrombocytopenic, Idiopathic/complications , Syndrome , Taiwan/epidemiology , Thrombocytopenia/epidemiology , Thrombocytopenia/etiology , Thrombosis/complications , Vaccination/adverse effects
9.
EuropePMC;
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-325850

ABSTRACT

Recent advances in protein function prediction exploit graph-based deep learning approaches to correlate the structural and topological features of proteins with their molecular functions. However, proteins in vivo are not static but dynamic molecules that alter conformation for functional purposes. Here we apply normal mode analysis to native protein conformations and augment protein graphs by connecting edges between dynamically correlated residue pairs. In the multilabel function classification task, our method demonstrates a remarkable performance gain based on this dynamics-informed representation. The proposed graph neural network, ProDAR, increases the interpretability and generalizability of residue-level annotations and robustly reflects structural nuance in proteins. We elucidate the importance of dynamic information in graph representation by comparing class activation maps for the hMTH1, nitrophorin, and SARS-CoV-2 receptor binding domain. Our model successfully learns the dynamic fingerprints of proteins and provides molecular insights into protein functions, with vast untapped potential for broad biotechnology and pharmaceutical applications.

10.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-309738

ABSTRACT

Background: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is an emerged infection raised widely concerns for pneumonia and respiratory manifestations. It is noteworthy that digestive symptoms are frequently observed in COVID-19 patients. We sought to describe the immune-inflammatory characteristics of COVID-19 patients with digestive symptoms and mild disease severity. Methods: : We designated enrolled mild patients into three subtypes depending on the patients with or without digestive symptoms, including Digestive only (digestive symptoms only), Respiratory only (respiratory symptoms only) and Digestive+ Respiratory (Both digestive and respiratory symptoms). Patient discharge was based on negative results of rRT-PCR testing for SARS-CoV-2 from at least two sequential respiratory tract specimens collected ≥24 hours apart. The multiorgan function, immune-inflammatory characteristics were analyzed among three groups. Results: : Mild liver damage and the activation of immuno-inflammatory system are the most abnormalities in mild patients but no significant differences were found (p>0.05). Compared with the Respiratory only group, patients with digestive symptoms were more likely to have slightly higher and later peak values of inflammatory cytokines during the subsequent course of disease(P<0.05). Additionally, we also found that there was a significant correlation between IL-2 and TNF level in the Digestive only cases (P<0.05). Conclusions: : Mild patients only/accompanied with digestive symptoms are a special subtype of COVID-19. Patients in this group were more likely to have slightly higher and later peak values of inflammatory cytokines during the subsequent course of disease. The prevention and clinical management of this type should be taken into consideration.

11.
BJPsych open ; 7(Suppl 1):S224-S224, 2021.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1661447

ABSTRACT

Aims Physical health outcomes are poor for patients with severe mental illness as demonstrated by the significant mortality gap present globally.[1] Access to and engagement with care is a key factor underpinning this disparity.[2] The Early Intervention in Psychosis service works with young people from 14-35 experiencing a first episode of psychosis in the community. Within the service, difficulties in engagement have been reflected in the high ‘no-show’ rates observed in the Foundation Year 2 trainee doctor-led physical health clinic. This quality improvement project aimed to reduce the ‘did not attend’ (DNA) rate in the physical health clinic by 20% in order to improve patient outcomes, particularly in the context of their physical health. Method The project took place between September and November 2020, over the course of 10 weeks. A driver diagram was constructed to identify key influencing factors and subsequent change ideas. In order to implement each of these changes, three cycles within the Plan, Do, Study, Act (PDSA) ramp framework were completed. These consisted of phone reminders within 48 hours of appointments, a teaching session for staff alongside the distribution of an accompanying information leaflet and increased flexibility in clinic times with opportunistic appointments. The change ideas were cumulative with each cycle lasting a duration of seventeen days. Result The baseline DNA rate was calculated based on the preceding month and found to be 55%. Following cycle one of the project, there was a significant reduction in DNA rates to 30% although this remained relatively stable at 33% after cycle two. By the end of cycle three when all interventions had been introduced, the DNA rate had dropped to 22%. As such, a total drop in DNA rate of over 30% was achieved which surpassed the initial aim of the project. Conclusion The outcomes of this project demonstrate that the introduction of even simple measures can lead to positive change. Successful implementation of these changes requires teamwork and a culture of openness and flexibility. Feedback from team members, particularly care coordinators, also indicated better resulting engagement of clients with the service overall, suggesting potential for both improved mental and physical health outcomes. Next steps for this project may involve not only continued implementation of established changes but also service user input and scope for virtual consultations particularly in light of current COVID-19 restrictions.

12.
Asia Pacific Scholar ; 7(1):33-43, 2022.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-1604179

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Medical schools universally responded by migrating teaching and learning to virtual learning environments (VLE) due to the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic. The use of virtual problem-based learning (PBL) in lieu of face-to-face sessions seems to be an appropriate response, but its effectiveness was understudied. The study compared the learning experiences of preclinical medical students at the beginning and completion of the virtual PBL. Methods: The study was conducted at the University of Malaya, a public-funded university in Malaysia. A 12-item questionnaire was developed and validated to assess the learning experiences of students conducting virtual PBL sessions. Principal component analysis and test for internal consistency suggested that the questionnaire is valid and reliable. The questionnaire was administered to pre-clinical students (Year 1 and Year 2) twice: at the beginning and the end of the virtual PBL implementation. Their responses were compared for the domains “learning”, “confidence” and “concern”. Results: Three hundred and forty-four pre-clinical students were recruited but only 275 students (80%) responded to both the initial and final questionnaires. Based on the responses, the learning experiences of students generally improved by the completion of the virtual PBL implementation. Students were most convinced that they obtained and understood the information given during the virtual PBL. However, they continued to be worried about passing the clinical examination and content acquisition. Conclusion: The study supports the feasibility of virtual PBL as an acceptable alternative to replace face-to-face PBL during the COVID-19 pandemic. [ FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of Asia Pacific Scholar is the property of Centre for Medical Education (CenMed) and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full . (Copyright applies to all s.)

13.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-294497

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Medical schools throughout the world were forced to modify their programming during the COVID-19 pandemic. In Malaysia, virtual learning plans were implemented for non-clinical programming, while clinical posting modifications were designed to meet local SOPs. The prolonged enforcement of these modifications to undergraduate medical education will have affected student experiences, including well-being. Since these feelings can relate to perceived relatedness, autonomy, and competence, it is important to identify any potential factors that may lead to reduced intrinsic motivation in students. It is also important to consider how demographic features may contribute to student perspectives, which can be studied using the unique diversity represented by Malaysian students. Methods: A quantitative survey was distributed to Malaysian medical students to assess their overall wellbeing, autonomy in educational decision making, student experiences, and position on changes to graduation timing. Intrinsic components were identified using Principal Component Analysis and were aligned with the three needs for self-determination, namely relatedness, autonomy, and competence. Finally, trends in responses for participants from various sub-populations were assessed using ANOVA testing. Results: Responses were collected from 442 students representing 23 accredited Malaysian medical schools. Upon validation and reliability testing, eight components were identified with themes relating to: mental health, social concerns, communication, timing of modifications, depth of learning, and student-centred learning. Of these, gender was related to mental health, student-centred learning, and delayed graduation, while stage was related to student-centred learning and delayed graduation in addition to concerns about depth of learning and timing of modifications. Interestingly, ethnicity was related to differences in opinions about delayed graduation and income was related to social concerns. Conclusion: The results of this study indicate that, while students were satisfied in general with the content and delivery of their programmes given the circumstances, there is evidence to suggest negative effects on emotional wellbeing, expression of student voice, due to the modifications that were made. Additionally, these feelings related to the three motivational needs, suggesting that students were experiencing a dampened motivational profile during the pandemic. Further, motivational profiles were distinct between student sub-groups, providing insight for developing appropriate and inclusive accommodations moving forward.

14.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-293562

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Medical schools throughout the world were forced to modify their programming during the COVID-19 pandemic. In Malaysia, virtual learning plans were implemented for non-clinical programming, while clinical posting modifications were designed to meet local SOPs. The prolonged enforcement of these modifications to undergraduate medical education will have affected student experiences, including well-being. Since these feelings can relate to perceived relatedness, autonomy, and competence, it is important to identify any potential factors that may lead to reduced intrinsic motivation in students. It is also important to consider how demographic features may contribute to student perspectives, which can be studied using the unique diversity represented by Malaysian students. Methods: A quantitative survey was distributed to Malaysian medical students to assess their overall wellbeing, autonomy in educational decision making, student experiences, and position on changes to graduation timing. Intrinsic components were identified using Principal Component Analysis and were aligned with the three needs for self-determination, namely relatedness, autonomy, and competence. Finally, trends in responses for participants from various sub-populations were assessed using ANOVA testing. Results: Responses were collected from 442 students representing 23 accredited Malaysian medical schools. Upon validation and reliability testing, eight components were identified with themes relating to: mental health, social concerns, communication, timing of modifications, depth of learning, and student-centred learning. Of these, gender was related to mental health, student-centred learning, and delayed graduation, while stage was related to student-centred learning and delayed graduation in addition to concerns about depth of learning and timing of modifications. Interestingly, ethnicity was related to differences in opinions about delayed graduation and income was related to social concerns. Conclusion: The results of this study indicate that, while students were satisfied in general with the content and delivery of their programmes given the circumstances, there is evidence to suggest negative effects on emotional wellbeing, expression of student voice, due to the modifications that were made. Additionally, these feelings related to the three motivational needs, suggesting that students were experiencing a dampened motivational profile during the pandemic. Further, motivational profiles were distinct between student sub-groups, providing insight for developing appropriate and inclusive accommodations moving forward.

15.
International Journal of Human–Computer Interaction ; : 1-14, 2021.
Article in English | Taylor & Francis | ID: covidwho-1479882
16.
Inf Syst Front ; : 1-18, 2021 Oct 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1474045

ABSTRACT

As the COVID-19 pandemic continues to spread at an unprecedented rate, many universities around the world halted physical forms of teaching and learning to stop the spread of the virus. As a result, many university students were forced to utilize online learning through channels such as mobile social media. Due to the novelty of this situation, there are many unknowns particularly with the negative influences of mobile learning via social media on university students. Thus, this study looks to examine this subject matter from the perspective of the stimulus-organism-response theory. The uniquely developed research model included four stimuli (i.e., social overload, information overload, life invasion, and privacy invasion), two organisms (i.e., technostress and exhaustion) as well as a response in terms of reduced intention to use mobile learning via social media. The responses were collected from 384 university students via an online survey and analyzed with the Partial-Least-Square-Structural-Equation-Modelling. It was found that the antecedents for both technostress and exhaustion were able to account for more than half of their respective variances. Furthermore, technostress and exhaustion were significant facilitators of the students' reduced intention to use mobile learning via social media. In addition to the practical insights for stakeholders in the education industry, this study also posited several theoretical implications for researchers.

17.
J Clin Med ; 10(19)2021 Sep 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1463722

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The Netherlands strives for hepatitis C virus (HCV) elimination, in accordance with the World Health Organization targets. An accurate estimate when HCV elimination will be reached is elusive. We have embarked on a nationwide HCV elimination project (CELINE) that allowed us to harvest detailed data on the Dutch HCV epidemic. This study aims to provide a well-supported timeline towards HCV elimination in The Netherlands. METHODS: A previously published Markov model was used, adopting published data and unpublished CELINE project data. Two main scenarios were devised. In the Status Quo scenario, 2020 diagnosis and treatment levels remained constant in subsequent years. In the Gradual Decline scenario, an annual decrease of 10% in both diagnoses and treatments was implemented, starting in 2020. WHO incidence target was disregarded, due to low HCV incidence in The Netherlands (≤5 per 100,000). RESULTS: Following the Status Quo and Gradual Decline scenarios, The Netherlands would meet WHO's elimination targets by 2027 and 2032, respectively. From 2015 to 2030, liver-related mortality would be reduced by 97% in the Status Quo and 93% in the Gradual Decline scenario. Compared to the Status Quo scenario, the Gradual Decline scenario would result in 12 excess cases of decompensated cirrhosis, 18 excess cases of hepatocellular carcinoma, and 20 excess cases of liver-related death from 2020-2030. CONCLUSIONS: The Netherlands is on track to reach HCV elimination by 2030. However, it is vital that HCV elimination remains high on the agenda to ensure adequate numbers of patients are being diagnosed and treated.

19.
Asia Pacific Scholar ; 6(3):5-9, 2021.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-1323518

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The article is a succinct summary of events and process for emergency digitisation and transition to remote teaching during the COVID-19 pandemic. The challenges of such transition included the need for enhanced infrastructure facilities, compliance to directives from regulatory bodies, providing an equivalent learning experience in the virtual learning environment (VLE) and ensuring the end user capacity to utilise the VLE created. Methods: To accomplish this task a suitable instructional design and transition model was utilised to create an integrated Moodle and Microsoft Teams platform as the VLE. The curriculum was recreated in the VLE through review of existing infrastructure and resources, deconstructing the demands of the curriculum, reconstructing the learning experiences of curriculum in VLE and innovating to improve. The end user training was also provided using the same VLE created, which ensured capacity building. Virtual Clinical Assessments (VCA) were created to ensure the completion of assessment tasks. Results: The utilisation of the ACTIONS transition model resulted in the evolution of instructional delivery from a Web Enhanced approach to a customised Web Centric approach and implementation of Virtual Clinical Assessments. Students expressed their satisfaction in the learning experience through VLE, but were anxious about their clinical training and connectivity issues. Conclusion: This transition demonstrated the need of future directions in terms of learner readiness to be more self-directed and self-determined, design thinking for transformation to a Web Centric curriculum, faculty readiness to change and develop the competency of Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK). [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of Asia Pacific Scholar is the property of Centre for Medical Education (CenMed) and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)

20.
Telemat Inform ; 64: 101676, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1313455

ABSTRACT

The mass spreading of COVID-19 has changed the paradigm of the education industry. In China and many other nations, universities have introduced compulsory remote education programs such as mobile learning (m-learning) to prevent public health hazards caused by the pandemic. However, so far, there is still a lack of understanding of student's learning experience responses in compulsory m-learning programs. As such, there is a necessity to explore the factors and mechanisms which drives students' experience. This paper evaluates the influence of both pedagogy and technology on learner's compulsory m-learning experience response (ER) by extending the mobile technology acceptance model (MTAM) during the COVID-19 pandemic. An online self-administered questionnaire was used to collect the data, which was then analysed through SmartPLS 3.2.9. Importance-performance matrix analysis was applied as a post-hoc procedure to gauge the importance and performance of the exogenous constructs. The results revealed that perceptions of m-learning's learning content quality, user interface, and system's connectivity affect the perceived mobile usefulness and easiness which in turn affects ER. This paper validates MTAM in the field of education by integrating MTAM with pedagogy and technology attributes under a social emergency setting such as the COVID-19 pandemic. In addition, the current research explains users' ER rather than behaviour intention which is commonly adopted in past studies.

SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL