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1.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-319204

ABSTRACT

Since May 2020, several COVID-19 outbreaks have occurred in the German meat industry despite various protective measures, and temperature and ventilation conditions were considered as possible high-risk factors. This cross-sectional study examined meat and poultry plants to examine possible risk factors. Companies completed a self-administered questionnaire on the work environment and protective measures taken to prevent SARS-CoV-2 infection. Multivariable logistic regression analysis adjusted for the possibility to distance at least 1.5 meters, break rules, and employment status was performed to identify risk factors associated with COVID-19 cases. Twenty-two meat and poultry plants with 19,072 employees participated. The prevalence of COVID-19 in the seven plants with more than 10 cases was 12.1% and was highest in the deboning and meat cutting area with 16.1%. A subsample analysis where information on maximal ventilation rate per employee was available revealed an effect for ventilation rate (adjusted odds ratio (AOR) 0.996, 95% CI 0.993-0.999). When including temperature as an interaction term in the working area, the effect of the ventilation rate did not change. Increasing room temperatures resulted in a lower chance of obtaining a positive COVID-19 test result (AOR 0.90 95% CI 0.82-0.99), and a 0.1% greater chance of a positive COVID-19 test for the interaction term (AOR 1.001, 95% CI 1.000-1.003). Our results further indicate that climate conditions and low outdoor air flow are factors that can promote the spread of SARS-CoV-2 aerosols. A possible requirement for pandemic mitigation strategies in industrial workplace settings is to increase the ventilation rate.

2.
Internist (Berl) ; 62(9): 928-936, 2021 Sep.
Article in German | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1355998

ABSTRACT

Employee health and ability to perform is essential to a functioning health care system. Even before the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, a substantial proportion of employees reported impaired mental health at work. This paper outlines the state of knowledge and evidence on interventions to promote mental health in the workplace, with particular focus on the organization of work and activities. In addition to an initial review of approaches, the factors facilitating successful and effective approaches are addressed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Delivery of Health Care , Health Personnel , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2
3.
PLoS One ; 16(6): e0242456, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1264207

ABSTRACT

Since May 2020, several COVID-19 outbreaks have occurred in the German meat industry despite various protective measures, and temperature and ventilation conditions were considered as possible high-risk factors. This cross-sectional study examined meat and poultry plants to assess possible risk factors. Companies completed a self-administered questionnaire on the work environment and protective measures taken to prevent SARS-CoV-2 infection. Multivariable logistic regression analysis adjusted for the possibility to distance at least 1.5 meters, break rules, and employment status was performed to identify risk factors associated with COVID-19 cases. Twenty-two meat and poultry plants with 19,072 employees participated. The prevalence of COVID-19 in the seven plants with more than 10 cases was 12.1% and was highest in the deboning and meat cutting area with 16.1%. A subsample analysis where information on maximal ventilation rate per employee was available revealed an association with the ventilation rate (adjusted odds ratio (AOR) 0.996, 95% CI 0.993-0.999). When including temperature as an interaction term in the working area, the association with the ventilation rate did not change. When room temperatures increased, the chance of testing positive for COVID-19 (AOR 0.90 95% CI 0.82-0.99) decreased, and the chance for testing positive for COVID-19for the interaction term (AOR 1.001, 95% CI 1.000-1.003) increased. Employees who work where a minimum distance of less than 1.5 m between workers was the norm had a higher chance of testing positive (AOR 3.61; 95% CI 2.83-4.6). Our results further indicate that climate conditions and low outdoor air flow are factors that can promote the spread of SARS-CoV-2 aerosols. A possible requirement for pandemic mitigation strategies in industrial workplace settings is to increase the ventilation rate.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/transmission , Food Industry , Workplace , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Disease Outbreaks , Employment , Food Industry/organization & administration , Germany/epidemiology , Humans , Meat Products/supply & distribution , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Temperature , Ventilation , Workplace/organization & administration
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