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1.
Journal of clinical and translational science ; 5(Suppl 1):108-108, 2021.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1710877

ABSTRACT

IMPACT: In a global pandemic where data development and dissemination are integral to combating the disease, the Clinical Research Support Center at the University of Minnesota provides a model of comprehensive virtual support, helping to attain and disseminate novel research on COVID-19, its individual and community impact, and treatment initiatives/outcomes. OBJECTIVES/GOALS: The pandemic created massive disruption to the conduct of clinical research with an unprecedented reorientation towards COVID-19. In this fast-paced environment, the Clinical Research Support Center (CRSC) rapidly developed innovative means of supporting diverse research initiatives. METHODS/STUDY POPULATION: The CRSC rapidly transitioned into a virtual environment and developed tools for the clinical research community to enhance remote clinical trial start up. This includes supporting remote consent, eBinders, COVID-19 research training for clinical staff, and easier identification of potential participants for COVID-19 studies;all through virtual support. Support provided research teams guidance on study protocols, regulatory requirements, informatics, biostatistics, financial management, recruitment strategies to support critical, urgent COVID-19 research. We outline proactive examples of how the CRSC now provides support to research teams through the pandemic. RESULTS/ANTICIPATED RESULTS: From March-November 2020, 116 COVID-19 projects received virtual support from the CRSC for COVID-19 research: disease understanding (n=27), treatment (n=23), pandemic impact (n=20), clinical care innovation (n=18), disease control and surveillance (n=10), prevention (n=9), detection (n=5), and impact on minorities (n=4). The diversity of these studies demonstrates the demand for and benefit from multidisciplinary expertise supporting study design and implementation. Through successful articulation and acceleration of research activities, the CRSC met the need for speed and rapidly adapted to new challenges created by the pandemic. DISCUSSION/SIGNIFICANCE OF FINDINGS: In a global pandemic where rapidly changing barriers to research is ongoing, through multidisciplinary efforts, the CRSC continues to provide comprehensive, virtual support to attain and disseminate novel research on COVID-19, its individual and community impact, and treatment initiatives/outcomes.

2.
Gut Microbes ; 13(1): 1-10, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1270726

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 precautions decrease social connectedness. It has been proposed that these measures alter the gut microbiota, with potential clinical consequences. We tested this hypothesis in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) receiving inpatient chemotherapy, a population with extensive exposure to the nosocomial setting and at high risk for infections. Hospitalized patients with AML contributed stool samples to a biorepository protocol that was initiated before COVID-19 and continued without change through the pandemic. Patient-, disease-, and treatment-related characteristics remained the same in the two eras and the only change in clinical care was the implementation of COVID-19 precautions in March 2020. The incidence of all-cause nosocomial infections during the pandemic was lower than in the pre-COVID-19 era. Multivariable analysis revealed an imprint of COVID-19 precautions in the gut microbiota as a viable mechanistic explanation. In conclusion, COVID-19 precautions alter the gut microbiota, thereby mediating pathogen susceptibility and nosocomial infections.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Cross Infection/epidemiology , Disease Susceptibility/microbiology , Gastrointestinal Microbiome/genetics , Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute/drug therapy , Aged , Antineoplastic Agents/therapeutic use , Feces/microbiology , Humans , Length of Stay , Masks , Middle Aged , Physical Distancing , Principal Component Analysis , RNA, Ribosomal, 16S/genetics , Risk , SARS-CoV-2
3.
Transplant Cell Ther ; 27(3): 270.e1-270.e6, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1108498

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 has spread rapidly worldwide, but the full impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the field of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) remains unknown. To understand this better, an 18-item online survey was disseminated by the Worldwide Network for Blood & Marrow Transplantation with questions exploring SARS-CoV-2 testing algorithms, mobilization, and cryopreservation strategies and COVID-19 infections in allogeneic related and autologous hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC) donors. The aim of this survey was to assess the impact of the outbreak on policies relating to HPC mobilization, collection, and processing with respect to changes in daily routine. A total of 91 individual responses from distinct centers in 6 continents were available for analysis. In these centers, the majority (72%) of allogeneic related and autologous donors are routinely tested for SARS-CoV-2 before HPC collection, and 80% of centers implement cryopreservation of allogeneic HPC grafts before commencing conditioning regimens in patients. Five related and 14 autologous donors who tested positive for COVID-19 did not experience any unexpected adverse events or reactions during growth factor administration (eg, hyperinflammatory syndrome). These data are limited by the small number of survey respondents but nonetheless suggest that centers are following the recommendations of appropriate scientific organizations and provide some preliminary data to suggest areas of further study.


Subject(s)
Bone Marrow Transplantation/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/epidemiology , Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Algorithms , Allografts , Bone Marrow Transplantation/trends , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Testing/methods , COVID-19 Testing/statistics & numerical data , Cryopreservation/methods , Donor Selection/standards , Global Health , Health Care Surveys , Hematopoietic Stem Cell Mobilization/statistics & numerical data , Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation/trends , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/statistics & numerical data , Procedures and Techniques Utilization/statistics & numerical data , Tissue Preservation/methods , Transplantation, Autologous , Unrelated Donors/statistics & numerical data
5.
Biol Blood Marrow Transplant ; 26(7): e161-e166, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-799190

ABSTRACT

With the COVID-19 pandemic and the ensuing barriers to the collection and transport of donor cells, it is often necessary to collect and cryopreserve grafts before initiation of transplantation conditioning. The effect on transplantation outcomes in nonmalignant disease is unknown. This analysis examined the effect of cryopreservation of related and unrelated donor grafts for transplantation for severe aplastic anemia in the United States during 2013 to 2019. Included are 52 recipients of cryopreserved grafts who were matched for age, donor type, and graft type to 194 recipients who received noncryopreserved grafts. Marginal Cox regression models were built to study the effect of cryopreservation and other risk factors associated with outcomes. We recorded higher 1-year rates of graft failure (hazard ratio [HR], 2.26; 95% confidence interval, 1.17 to 4.35; P = .01) and of 1-year overall mortality (HR, 3.13; 95% CI, 1.60 to 6.11; P = .0008) after transplantation of cryopreserved compared with noncryopreserved grafts, with adjustment for sex, performance score, comorbidity, cytomegalovirus serostatus, and ABO blood group match. The incidence of acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease did not differ between the 2 groups. Adjusted probabilities of 1-year survival were 73% (95% CI, 60% to 84%) in the cryopreserved graft group and 91% (95% CI, 86% to 94%) in the noncryopreserved graft group. These data support the use of noncryopreserved grafts whenever possible in patients with severe aplastic anemia.


Subject(s)
Anemia, Aplastic/therapy , Bone Marrow Transplantation/methods , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Cryopreservation/methods , Graft Rejection/pathology , Graft vs Host Disease/pathology , Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Acute Disease , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Anemia, Aplastic/immunology , Anemia, Aplastic/mortality , Anemia, Aplastic/pathology , COVID-19 , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Graft Rejection/immunology , Graft Rejection/mortality , Graft vs Host Disease/immunology , Graft vs Host Disease/mortality , Histocompatibility Testing , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , Siblings , Survival Analysis , Transplantation Conditioning/methods , United States/epidemiology , Unrelated Donors
7.
Biol Blood Marrow Transplant ; 26(12): 2181-2189, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-722012

ABSTRACT

The current COVID-19 pandemic, caused by SARS-CoV-2, has impacted many facets of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) in both developed and developing countries. Realizing the challenges as a result of this pandemic affecting the daily practice of the HCT centers and the recognition of the variability in practice worldwide, the Worldwide Network for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (WBMT) and the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research's (CIBMTR) Health Services and International Studies Committee have jointly produced an expert opinion statement as a general guide to deal with certain aspects of HCT, including diagnostics for SARS-CoV-2 in HCT recipient, pre- and post-HCT management, donor issues, medical tourism, and facilities management. During these crucial times, which may last for months or years, the HCT community must reorganize to proceed with transplantation activity in those patients who urgently require it, albeit with extreme caution. This shared knowledge may be of value to the HCT community in the absence of high-quality evidence-based medicine. © 2020 American Society for Transplantation and Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc.


Subject(s)
Bone Marrow Transplantation , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/therapy , Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans
8.
Biol Blood Marrow Transplant ; 26(7): 1312-1317, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-208523

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has created significant barriers to timely donor evaluation, cell collection, and graft transport for allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HCT). To ensure availability of donor cells on the scheduled date of infusion, many sites now collect cryopreserved grafts before the start of pretransplantation conditioning. Post-transplantation cyclophosphamide (ptCY) is an increasingly used approach for graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis, but the impact of graft cryopreservation on the outcomes of allo-HCT using ptCY is not known. Using the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR) database, we compared the outcomes of HCT using cryopreserved versus fresh grafts in patients undergoing HCT for hematologic malignancy with ptCY. We analyzed 274 patients with hematologic malignancy undergoing allo-HCT between 2013 and 2018 with cryopreserved grafts and ptCY. Eighteen patients received bone marrow grafts and 256 received peripheral blood stem cell grafts. These patients were matched for age, graft type, disease risk index (DRI), and propensity score with 1080 patients who underwent allo-HCT with fresh grafts. The propensity score, which is an assessment of the likelihood of receiving a fresh graft versus a cryopreserved graft, was calculated using logistic regression to account for the following: disease histology, Karnofsky Performance Score (KPS), HCT Comorbidity Index, conditioning regimen intensity, donor type, and recipient race. The primary endpoint was overall survival (OS). Secondary endpoints included acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), non-relapse mortality (NRM), relapse/progression and disease-free survival (DFS). Because of multiple comparisons, only P values <.01 were considered statistically significant. The 2 cohorts (cryopreserved and fresh) were similar in terms of patient age, KPS, diagnosis, DRI, HCT-CI, donor/graft source, and conditioning intensity. One-year probabilities of OS were 71.1% (95% confidence interval [CI], 68.3% to 73.8%) with fresh grafts and 70.3% (95% CI, 64.6% to 75.7%) with cryopreserved grafts (P = .81). Corresponding probabilities of OS at 2 years were 60.6% (95% CI, 57.3% to 63.8%) and 58.7% (95% CI, 51.9% to 65.4%) (P = .62). In matched-pair regression analysis, graft cryopreservation was not associated with a significantly higher risk of mortality (hazard ratio [HR] for cryopreserved versus fresh, 1.05; 95% CI, .86 to 1.29; P = .60). Similarly, rates of neutrophil recovery (HR, .91; 95% CI, .80 to 1.02; P = .12), platelet recovery (HR, .88; 95% CI, .78 to 1.00; P = .05), grade III-IV acute GVHD (HR, .78; 95% CI, .50 to 1.22; P = .27), NRM (HR, 1.16; 95% CI, .86 to 1.55; P = .32) and relapse/progression (HR, 1.21; 95% CI, .97 to 1.50; P = .09) were similar with cryopreserved grafts versus fresh grafts. There were somewhat lower rates of chronic GVHD (HR, 78; 95% CI, .61 to .99; P = .04) and DFS (HR for treatment failure, 1.19; 95% CI, 1.01 to 1.29; P = .04) with graft cryopreservation that were of marginal statistical significance after adjusting for multiple comparisons. Overall, our data indicate that graft cryopreservation does not significantly delay hematopoietic recovery, increase the risk of acute GVHD or NRM, or decrease OS after allo-HCT using ptCY.


Subject(s)
Bone Marrow Transplantation/methods , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Cryopreservation/methods , Graft vs Host Disease/prevention & control , Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation/methods , Leukemia/therapy , Lymphoma/therapy , Myelodysplastic Syndromes/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19 , Cohort Studies , Cyclophosphamide/therapeutic use , Female , Graft vs Host Disease/immunology , Graft vs Host Disease/mortality , Graft vs Host Disease/pathology , Histocompatibility Testing , Humans , Leukemia/immunology , Leukemia/mortality , Leukemia/pathology , Lymphoma/immunology , Lymphoma/mortality , Lymphoma/pathology , Male , Middle Aged , Myelodysplastic Syndromes/immunology , Myelodysplastic Syndromes/mortality , Myelodysplastic Syndromes/pathology , Pandemics , Siblings , Survival Analysis , Transplantation Conditioning/methods , Transplantation, Homologous , United States/epidemiology , Unrelated Donors/supply & distribution
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