Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 39
Filter
1.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-294306

ABSTRACT

Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) instructs monocytes to differentiate into alveolar macrophages (AM) that preserve lung homeostasis. By comparing AM development in mouse and human, we discovered that COVID-19 patients showed marked defects in GM-CSF-dependent AM instruction. The multi-center, open-label, randomized, controlled SARPAC-trial evaluated the efficacy and safety of 5 days of inhalation of rhu-GM-CSF (sargramostim, Leukine®) in 81 non-ventilated patients with COVID-19 and hypoxemic respiratory failure identified by PaO2/FiO2 ratio < 350mmHg. At day 6, more patients in the sargramostim group experienced at least 25% improvement in oxygenation compared with the standard of care group. Higher numbers of circulating class-switched B cells and effector virus-specific CD8 lymphocytes were found in the sargramostim group. Treatment adverse events, including signs of cytokine storm, were not different between active and control group. This proof-of-concept study demonstrates the feasibility and safety of inhaled GM-CSF in restoring alveolar gas exchange, while simultaneously boosting anti-COVID-19 immunity. ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT04326920).

2.
Front Immunol ; 12: 747830, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1551503

ABSTRACT

Background: Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is the virus responsible of the current pandemic ongoing all around the world. Since its discovery in 2019, several circulating variants have emerged and some of them are associated with increased infections and death rate. Despite the genetic differences among these variants, vaccines approved for human use have shown a good immunogenic and protective response against them. In Chile, over 70% of the vaccinated population is immunized with CoronaVac, an inactivated SARS-CoV-2 vaccine. The immune response elicited by this vaccine has been described against the first SARS-CoV-2 strain isolated from Wuhan, China and the D614G strain (lineage B). To date, four SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern described have circulated worldwide. Here, we describe the neutralizing capacities of antibodies secreted by volunteers in the Chilean population immunized with CoronaVac against variants of concern Alpha (B.1.1.7), Beta (B.1.351) Gamma (P.1) and Delta (B.617.2). Methods: Volunteers enrolled in a phase 3 clinical trial were vaccinated with two doses of CoronaVac in 0-14 or 0-28 immunization schedules. Sera samples were used to evaluate the capacity of antibodies induced by the vaccine to block the binding between Receptor Binding Domain (RBD) from variants of concern and the human ACE2 receptor by an in-house ELISA. Further, conventional microneutralization assays were used to test neutralization of SARS-CoV-2 infection. Moreover, interferon-γ-secreting T cells against Spike from variants of concern were evaluated in PBMCs from vaccinated subjects using ELISPOT. Results: CoronaVac promotes the secretion of antibodies able to block the RBD of all the SARS-CoV-2 variants studied. Seropositivity rates of neutralizing antibodies in the population evaluated were over 97% for the lineage B strain, over 80% for Alpha and Gamma variants, over 75% for Delta variant and over 60% for the Beta variant. Geometric means titers of blocking antibodies were reduced when tested against SARS-CoV-2 variants as compared to ancestral strain. We also observed that antibodies from vaccinated subjects were able to neutralize the infection of variants D614G, Alpha, Gamma and Delta in a conventional microneutralization assay. Importantly, after SARS-CoV-2 infection, we observed that the blocking capacity of antibodies from vaccinated volunteers increased up to ten times for all the variants tested. We compared the number of interferon-γ-secreting T cells specific for SARS-CoV-2 Spike WT and variants of concern from vaccinated subjects and we did not detect significant differences. Conclusion: Immunization with CoronaVac in either immunization schedule promotes the secretion of antibodies able to block SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern and partially neutralizes SARS-CoV-2 infection. In addition, it stimulates cellular responses against all variants of concern.

3.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-293156

ABSTRACT

The characteristics of immune memory established in response to inactivated SARS-CoV-2 vaccines remains unclear. We determined the magnitude, quality and persistence of cellular and humoral memory responses up to 6 months after vaccination with BBV152/Covaxin. Here, we show that the quantity of vaccine-induced spike- and nucleoprotein-antibodies is comparable to that following natural infection and the antibodies are detectable up to 6 months. The RBD-specific antibodies decline in the range of 3 to 10-fold against the SARS-CoV-2 variants in the order of alpha (B.1.1.7) > delta (B.1.617.2) > beta (B.1.351), with no observed impact of gamma (P.1) and kappa (B.1.617.1) variant. We found that the vaccine induces memory B cells, similar to natural infection, which are impacted by virus variants in the same order as antibodies. The vaccine further induced antigen-specific functionally potent multi-cytokine expressing CD4+ T cells in ~85% of the subjects, targeting spike and nucleoprotein of SARS-CoV-2. Marginal ~1.3 fold-reduction was observed in vaccine-induced CD4+ T cells against the beta variant, with no significant impact of the alpha and the delta variants. The antigen-specific CD4+ T cells were populated in the central memory compartment and persisted up to 6 months of vaccination. Importantly the vaccine generated Tfh cells that are endowed with B cell help potential, similar to the Tfh cells induced after natural infection. Altogether, these findings establish that the inactivated virus vaccine BBV152 induces robust immune memory to SARS-CoV-2 and variants of concern, which persist for at least 6 months after vaccination. This study provides insight into the attributes of BBV152-elicited immune memory, and has implication for future vaccine development, guidance for use of inactivated virus vaccine, and booster immunization.

4.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-293107

ABSTRACT

Numerous vaccines have been generated to decrease the morbidity and mortality of COVID-19. CoronaVac® is an inactivated SARS-CoV-2 vaccine approved by the World Health Organization (WHO) to prevent COVID-19 that has safety and immunogenicity profiles described in different clinical trials. We previously reported an increase in levels of neutralizing antibodies two- and four-weeks after administering two doses of CoronaVac® in a two-week interval (0-14 day) vaccination schedule, as compared to pre-immune sera in adults in the Chilean population that are participating in phase 3 clinical trial. Here we report the levels of antibodies directed against the Receptor Binding Domain of the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein comparing their neutralizing capacities and the cellular response at five months after the second dose and four weeks after a booster (third) dose in volunteers immunized with two doses of CoronaVac®in a four-week interval (0-28 day) vaccination schedule. We observed a decrease in the levels of anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies with neutralizing capacities five months after the second dose (GMU 39.0 95% confidence interval (CI)(32.4-47.0), which increased up to 12 times at four weeks after the booster dose (GMU 499.4, 95% CI=370.6-673.0). Equivalent results were observed in adults aged 18-59 years old and individuals ≥60 years old. In the case of cellular response, we observed that activation of specific CD4+ T cells increases in time and reaches its maximum at four weeks after the booster dose in both groups. Our results support the notion that a booster dose of the SARS-CoV-2 inactivated vaccine increases the levels of neutralizing antibodies and the specific cellular response in adults of both groups, which is likely to boost the protective capacity of these vaccines against COVID-19.

5.
Clin Infect Dis ; 73(9): e3130-e3132, 2021 11 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1532491

ABSTRACT

We investigated feasibility and accuracy of an interferon-γ release assay (IGRA) for detection of T-cell responses to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Whole blood IGRA accurately distinguished between convalescent and uninfected healthy blood donors with a predominantly CD4+ T-cell response. SARS-CoV-2 IGRA may serve as a useful diagnostic tool in managing the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Interferon-gamma Release Tests , Antibodies, Viral , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , T-Lymphocytes
6.
Preprint in English | [Unspecified Source] | ID: ppcovidwho-292783

ABSTRACT

The contribution of CD4+ T cells to protective or pathogenic immune responses to SARS-CoV-2 infection remains unknown. Here, we present large-scale single-cell transcriptomic analysis of viral antigen-reactive CD4+ T cells from 32 COVID-19 patients. In patients with severe disease compared to mild disease, we found increased proportions of cytotoxic follicular helper (T(FH)) cells and cytotoxic T helper cells (CD4-CTLs) responding to SARS-CoV-2, and reduced proportion of SARS-CoV-2 reactive regulatory T cells. Importantly, the CD4-CTLs were highly enriched for the expression of transcripts encoding chemokines that are involved in the recruitment of myeloid cells and dendritic cells to the sites of viral infection. Polyfunctional T helper (T(H))1 cells and TH17 cell subsets were underrepresented in the repertoire of SARS-CoV-2-reactive CD4+ T cells compared to influenza-reactive CD4+ T cells. Together, our analyses provide so far unprecedented insights into the gene expression patterns of SARS-CoV-2 reactive CD4+ T cells in distinct disease severities. Funding: This work was funded by NIH grants U19AI142742 (P.V., A.S., C.H.O), U19AI118626 (P.V., A.S., G.S.), R01HL114093 (P.V., F.A., G.S.,), R35-GM128938 (F.A), S10RR027366 (BD FACSAria-II), S10OD025052 (Illumina Novaseq6000), the William K. Bowes Jr Foundation (P.V.), and Whittaker foundation (P.V., C.H.O.). Supported by the Wessex Clinical Research Network and National Institute of Health Research UK. Conflict of Interest: The authors declare no competing financial interests. Ethical Approval: Ethical approval for this study from the Berkshire Research Ethics Committee 20/SC/0155 and the Ethics Committee of La Jolla Institute for Immunology (LJI) was in place. Written consent was obtained from all subjects.

7.
Nat Med ; 27(11): 1990-2001, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526094

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 messenger RNA vaccination in healthy individuals generates immune protection against COVID-19. However, little is known about SARS-CoV-2 mRNA vaccine-induced responses in immunosuppressed patients. We investigated induction of antigen-specific antibody, B cell and T cell responses longitudinally in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) on anti-CD20 antibody monotherapy (n = 20) compared with healthy controls (n = 10) after BNT162b2 or mRNA-1273 mRNA vaccination. Treatment with anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody (aCD20) significantly reduced spike-specific and receptor-binding domain (RBD)-specific antibody and memory B cell responses in most patients, an effect ameliorated with longer duration from last aCD20 treatment and extent of B cell reconstitution. By contrast, all patients with MS treated with aCD20 generated antigen-specific CD4 and CD8 T cell responses after vaccination. Treatment with aCD20 skewed responses, compromising circulating follicular helper T (TFH) cell responses and augmenting CD8 T cell induction, while preserving type 1 helper T (TH1) cell priming. Patients with MS treated with aCD20 lacking anti-RBD IgG had the most severe defect in circulating TFH responses and more robust CD8 T cell responses. These data define the nature of the SARS-CoV-2 vaccine-induced immune landscape in aCD20-treated patients and provide insights into coordinated mRNA vaccine-induced immune responses in humans. Our findings have implications for clinical decision-making and public health policy for immunosuppressed patients including those treated with aCD20.

8.
Non-conventional in English | [Unspecified Source], Grey literature | ID: grc-750501

ABSTRACT

CD4 T follicular helper (T fh ) cells are important for the generation of long-lasting and specific humoral protection against viral infections. The degree to which SARS-CoV-2 infection generates T fh cells and stimulates the germinal center response is an important question as we investigate vaccine options for the current pandemic. Here we report that, following infection with SARS-CoV-2, adult rhesus macaques exhibited transient accumulation of activated, proliferating T fh cells in their peripheral blood on a transitory basis. The CD4 helper cell responses were skewed predominantly toward a T h 1 response in blood, lung, and lymph nodes, reflective of the interferon-rich cytokine environment following infection. We also observed the generation of germinal center T fh cells specific for the SARS-CoV-2 spike (S) and nucleocapsid (N) proteins, and a corresponding early appearance of antiviral serum IgG antibodies but delayed or absent IgA antibodies. Our data suggest that a vaccine promoting Th1-type Tfh responses that target the S protein may lead to protective immunity.

9.
Cell Host Microbe ; 29(11): 1611-1619.e5, 2021 11 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1466221

ABSTRACT

The Johnson and Johnson Ad26.COV2.S single-dose vaccine represents an attractive option for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccination in countries with limited resources. We examined the effect of prior infection with different SARS-CoV-2 variants on Ad26.COV2.S immunogenicity. We compared participants who were SARS-CoV-2 naive with those either infected with the ancestral D614G virus or infected in the second wave when Beta predominated. Prior infection significantly boosts spike-binding antibodies, antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, and neutralizing antibodies against D614G, Beta, and Delta; however, neutralization cross-reactivity varied by wave. Robust CD4 and CD8 T cell responses are induced after vaccination, regardless of prior infection. T cell recognition of variants is largely preserved, apart from some reduction in CD8 recognition of Delta. Thus, Ad26.COV2.S vaccination after infection could result in enhanced protection against COVID-19. The impact of the infecting variant on neutralization breadth after vaccination has implications for the design of second-generation vaccines based on variants of concern.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Vaccination , Adult , Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , T-Lymphocytes/immunology
12.
Immunity ; 54(9): 2133-2142.e3, 2021 09 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1433401

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 mRNA vaccines have shown remarkable clinical efficacy, but questions remain about the nature and kinetics of T cell priming. We performed longitudinal antigen-specific T cell analyses on healthy SARS-CoV-2-naive and recovered individuals prior to and following mRNA prime and boost vaccination. Vaccination induced rapid antigen-specific CD4+ T cell responses in naive subjects after the first dose, whereas CD8+ T cell responses developed gradually and were variable in magnitude. Vaccine-induced Th1 and Tfh cell responses following the first dose correlated with post-boost CD8+ T cells and neutralizing antibodies, respectively. Integrated analysis revealed coordinated immune responses with distinct trajectories in SARS-CoV-2-naive and recovered individuals. Last, whereas booster vaccination improved T cell responses in SARS-CoV-2-naive subjects, the second dose had little effect in SARS-CoV-2-recovered individuals. These findings highlight the role of rapidly primed CD4+ T cells in coordinating responses to the second vaccine dose in SARS-CoV-2-naive individuals.


Subject(s)
CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Th1 Cells/immunology , Adult , Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Antigens, CD/metabolism , Antigens, Differentiation, T-Lymphocyte/metabolism , Female , Humans , Immunity, Cellular , Immunity, Humoral , Immunization, Secondary , Immunologic Memory , Lectins, C-Type/metabolism , Lymphocyte Activation , Male , Middle Aged , Peptides/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Vaccination , Young Adult
13.
Clin Infect Dis ; 2021 Sep 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1429187

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The development of effective vaccines against COVID-19 is a global priority. CoronaVac is an inactivated SARS-CoV-2 vaccine with promising safety and immunogenicity profiles. This article reports safety and immunogenicity results obtained for healthy Chilean adults aged ≥18 in a phase 3 clinical trial. METHODS: Volunteers randomly received two doses of CoronaVac or placebo, separated by two weeks. 434 volunteers were enrolled, 397 aged 18-59 years, and 37 aged ≥60 years. Solicited and unsolicited adverse reactions were registered from all volunteers. Blood samples were obtained from a subset of volunteers and analyzed for humoral and cellular measures of immunogenicity. RESULTS: The primary adverse reaction in the 434 volunteers was pain at the injection site, with a higher incidence in the vaccine than in the placebo arm. Adverse reactions observed were mostly mild and local. No severe adverse events were reported. The humoral evaluation was performed on 81 volunteers. Seroconversion rates for specific anti-S1-RBD IgG were 86.67% in the 18-59 age group and 70.37% in the ≥60 age group, two and four weeks after the second dose. A significant increase in circulating neutralizing antibodies was detected two and four weeks after the second dose. The cellular evaluation was performed on 47 volunteers. We detected a significant induction of T cell responses characterized by the secretion of IFN-γupon stimulation with Mega Pools of peptides from SARS-CoV-2. CONCLUSIONS: Immunization with CoronaVac in a 0-14 schedule in Chilean adults aged ≥18 is safe, induces anti-S1-RBD IgG with neutralizing capacity, activates T cells, and promotes the secretion of IFN-γupon stimulation with SARS-CoV-2 antigens.

14.
Nat Med ; 27(11): 1990-2001, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1410406

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 messenger RNA vaccination in healthy individuals generates immune protection against COVID-19. However, little is known about SARS-CoV-2 mRNA vaccine-induced responses in immunosuppressed patients. We investigated induction of antigen-specific antibody, B cell and T cell responses longitudinally in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) on anti-CD20 antibody monotherapy (n = 20) compared with healthy controls (n = 10) after BNT162b2 or mRNA-1273 mRNA vaccination. Treatment with anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody (aCD20) significantly reduced spike-specific and receptor-binding domain (RBD)-specific antibody and memory B cell responses in most patients, an effect ameliorated with longer duration from last aCD20 treatment and extent of B cell reconstitution. By contrast, all patients with MS treated with aCD20 generated antigen-specific CD4 and CD8 T cell responses after vaccination. Treatment with aCD20 skewed responses, compromising circulating follicular helper T (TFH) cell responses and augmenting CD8 T cell induction, while preserving type 1 helper T (TH1) cell priming. Patients with MS treated with aCD20 lacking anti-RBD IgG had the most severe defect in circulating TFH responses and more robust CD8 T cell responses. These data define the nature of the SARS-CoV-2 vaccine-induced immune landscape in aCD20-treated patients and provide insights into coordinated mRNA vaccine-induced immune responses in humans. Our findings have implications for clinical decision-making and public health policy for immunosuppressed patients including those treated with aCD20.

16.
Sci Immunol ; 6(61)2021 07 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1315792

ABSTRACT

Ongoing SARS-CoV-2 vaccine development is focused on identifying stable, cost-effective, and accessible candidates for global use, specifically in low and middle-income countries. Here, we report the efficacy of a rapidly scalable, novel yeast expressed SARS-CoV-2 specific receptor-binding domain (RBD) based vaccine in rhesus macaques. We formulated the RBD immunogen in alum, a licensed and an emerging alum adsorbed TLR-7/8 targeted, 3M-052-alum adjuvants. The RBD+3M-052-alum adjuvanted vaccine promoted better RBD binding and effector antibodies, higher CoV-2 neutralizing antibodies, improved Th1 biased CD4+T cell reactions, and increased CD8+ T cell responses when compared to the alum-alone adjuvanted vaccine. RBD+3M-052-alum induced a significant reduction of SARS-CoV-2 virus in respiratory tract upon challenge, accompanied by reduced lung inflammation when compared with unvaccinated controls. Anti-RBD antibody responses in vaccinated animals inversely correlated with viral load in nasal secretions and BAL. RBD+3M-052-alum blocked a post SARS-CoV-2 challenge increase in CD14+CD16++ intermediate blood monocytes, and Fractalkine, MCP-1, and TRAIL in the plasma. Decreased plasma analytes and intermediate monocyte frequencies correlated with reduced nasal and BAL viral loads. Lastly, RBD-specific plasma cells accumulated in the draining lymph nodes and not in the bone marrow, contrary to previous findings. Together, these data show that a yeast expressed, RBD-based vaccine+3M-052-alum provides robust immune responses and protection against SARS-CoV-2, making it a strong and scalable vaccine candidate.


Subject(s)
Adjuvants, Immunologic/administration & dosage , Alum Compounds/administration & dosage , COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Saccharomycetales/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Administration, Inhalation , Administration, Intranasal , Animals , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Cell Line , Cytokines/immunology , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/immunology , Lung/pathology , Macaca mulatta , Male , Protein Binding , Protein Domains , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Viral Load
17.
Science ; 371(6529)2021 02 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1309798

ABSTRACT

Understanding immune memory to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is critical for improving diagnostics and vaccines and for assessing the likely future course of the COVID-19 pandemic. We analyzed multiple compartments of circulating immune memory to SARS-CoV-2 in 254 samples from 188 COVID-19 cases, including 43 samples at ≥6 months after infection. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) to the spike protein was relatively stable over 6+ months. Spike-specific memory B cells were more abundant at 6 months than at 1 month after symptom onset. SARS-CoV-2-specific CD4+ T cells and CD8+ T cells declined with a half-life of 3 to 5 months. By studying antibody, memory B cell, CD4+ T cell, and CD8+ T cell memory to SARS-CoV-2 in an integrated manner, we observed that each component of SARS-CoV-2 immune memory exhibited distinct kinetics.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19/immunology , Immunologic Memory , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , B-Lymphocytes/immunology , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Middle Aged , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , United States , Young Adult
18.
Cell Rep Med ; 2(7): 100355, 2021 Jul 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1294298

ABSTRACT

The emergence of SARS-CoV-2 variants with evidence of antibody escape highlight the importance of addressing whether the total CD4+ and CD8+ T cell recognition is also affected. Here, we compare SARS-CoV-2-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells against the B.1.1.7, B.1.351, P.1, and CAL.20C lineages in COVID-19 convalescents and in recipients of the Moderna (mRNA-1273) or Pfizer/BioNTech (BNT162b2) COVID-19 vaccines. The total reactivity against SARS-CoV-2 variants is similar in terms of magnitude and frequency of response, with decreases in the 10%-22% range observed in some assay/VOC combinations. A total of 7% and 3% of previously identified CD4+ and CD8+ T cell epitopes, respectively, are affected by mutations in the various VOCs. Thus, the SARS-CoV-2 variants analyzed here do not significantly disrupt the total SARS-CoV-2 T cell reactivity; however, the decreases observed highlight the importance for active monitoring of T cell reactivity in the context of SARS-CoV-2 evolution.

19.
Sci Immunol ; 6(60)2021 06 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1276879

ABSTRACT

The nutrient-sensing mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is integral to cell fate decisions after T cell activation. Sustained mTORC1 activity favors the generation of terminally differentiated effector T cells instead of follicular helper and memory T cells. This is particularly pertinent for T cell responses of older adults who have sustained mTORC1 activation despite dysfunctional lysosomes. Here, we show that lysosome-deficient T cells rely on late endosomes rather than lysosomes as an mTORC1 activation platform, where mTORC1 is activated by sensing cytosolic amino acids. T cells from older adults have an increased expression of the plasma membrane leucine transporter SLC7A5 to provide a cytosolic amino acid source. Hence, SLC7A5 and VPS39 deficiency (a member of the HOPS complex promoting early to late endosome conversion) substantially reduced mTORC1 activities in T cells from older but not young individuals. Late endosomal mTORC1 is independent of the negative-feedback loop involving mTORC1-induced inactivation of the transcription factor TFEB that controls expression of lysosomal genes. The resulting sustained mTORC1 activation impaired lysosome function and prevented lysosomal degradation of PD-1 in CD4+ T cells from older adults, thereby inhibiting their proliferative responses. VPS39 silencing of human T cells improved their expansion to pertussis and to SARS-CoV-2 peptides in vitro. Furthermore, adoptive transfer of CD4+ Vps39-deficient LCMV-specific SMARTA cells improved germinal center responses, CD8+ memory T cell generation, and recall responses to infection. Thus, curtailing late endosomal mTORC1 activity is a promising strategy to enhance T cell immunity.


Subject(s)
CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Endosomes/metabolism , Mechanistic Target of Rapamycin Complex 1/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Signal Transduction/genetics , Adoptive Transfer/methods , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Animals , Autophagy-Related Proteins/deficiency , Autophagy-Related Proteins/genetics , Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Leucine Zipper Transcription Factors/genetics , Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Leucine Zipper Transcription Factors/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Cells, Cultured , Female , Forkhead Box Protein O1/deficiency , Forkhead Box Protein O1/genetics , Healthy Volunteers , Humans , Large Neutral Amino Acid-Transporter 1/metabolism , Lysosomes/metabolism , Male , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Mice, Transgenic , Signal Transduction/immunology , Transfection , Vesicular Transport Proteins/deficiency , Vesicular Transport Proteins/genetics , Young Adult
20.
Cell Host Microbe ; 29(7): 1076-1092, 2021 07 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1240230

ABSTRACT

Over the past year, numerous studies in the peer reviewed and preprint literature have reported on the virological, epidemiological and clinical characteristics of the coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2. To date, 25 studies have investigated and identified SARS-CoV-2-derived T cell epitopes in humans. Here, we review these recent studies, how they were performed, and their findings. We review how epitopes identified throughout the SARS-CoV2 proteome reveal significant correlation between number of epitopes defined and size of the antigen provenance. We also report additional analysis of SARS-CoV-2 human CD4 and CD8 T cell epitope data compiled from these studies, identifying 1,400 different reported SARS-CoV-2 epitopes and revealing discrete immunodominant regions of the virus and epitopes that are more prevalently recognized. This remarkable breadth of epitope repertoire has implications for vaccine design, cross-reactivity, and immune escape by SARS-CoV-2 variants.


Subject(s)
Adaptive Immunity , COVID-19/immunology , Epitopes, T-Lymphocyte/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Antigens, Viral , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , Cross Reactions , Epitopes , Humans , Immunodominant Epitopes
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL
...