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1.
Zhongguo Yi Xue Ke Xue Yuan Xue Bao ; 44(1): 30-39, 2022 Feb.
Article in Chinese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1753709

ABSTRACT

Objective To measure the prevalence of mental health symptoms and identify the associated factors among college students at the beginning of coronavirus disease 2019(COVID-19)outbreak in China. Methods We carried out a multi-center cross-sectional study via snowball sampling and convenience sampling of the college students in different areas of China.The rates of self-reported depression,anxiety,and stress and post-traumatic stress disorder(PTSD)were assessed via the 21-item Depression-Anxiety-Stress Scale(DASS-21)and the 6-item Impact of Event Scale-Revised(IES-6),respectively.Covariates included sociodemographic characteristics,health-related data,and information of the social environment.Data pertaining to mental health service seeking were also collected.Multivariate Logistic regression analyses were performed to identify the risk factors. Results A total of 3641 valid questionnaires were collected from college students.At the beginning of the COVID-19 outbreak,535(14.69%)students had negative emotions,among which 402(11.04%),381(10.49%),and 171(4.90%)students had the symptoms of depression,anxiety,and stress,respectively.Meanwhile,1245(34.19%)college students had PTSD.Among the risk factors identified,male gender was associated with a lower likelihood of reporting depression symptoms(AOR=0.755,P=0.037],and medical students were at higher risk of depression and stress symptoms than liberal arts students(AOR=1.497,P=0.003;AOR=1.494,P=0.045).Family support was associated with lower risks of negative emotions and PTSD in college students(AOR=0.918,P<0.001;AOR=0.913,P<0.001;AOR=0.899,P<0.001;AOR=0.971,P=0.021). Conclusions College students were more sensitive to public health emergencies,and the incidence of negative emotions and PTSD was significantly higher than that before the outbreak of COVID-19.More attention should be paid to female college students who were more likely to develop negative emotions.We should strengthen positive and proper propaganda via mass media and help college students understand the situation and impact of COVID-19.Furthermore,we should enhance family support for college students.The government and relevant agencies need to provide appropriate mental health services to the students under similar circumstances to avoid the deterioration of their mental well-being.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Health Status , Humans , Male , Students/psychology , Universities
2.
Tourism Review of AIEST - International Association of Scientific Experts in Tourism ; 77(2):484-502, 2022.
Article in French | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1722844

ABSTRACT

Purpose>COVID-19 is currently the most serious crisis facing the world, and scholars in the medical and social sciences are working to save lives and mitigate the societal effects of the pandemic. This global public health emergency requires interdisciplinary work to provide comprehensive insight into a rapidly changing situation. However, attempts to integrate the medical and social sciences have met several barriers. This paper aims to identify feasible research opportunities for interdisciplinary studies across tourism and public health regarding COVID-19.Design/methodology/approach>This paper presents a critical review of the literature and generates corresponding conceptual and theoretical frameworks to provide an in-depth discussion.Findings>Tourism-related issues of destination management policies and capital are addressed from an interdisciplinary perspective. The conclusions encourage interdisciplinary research into global health problems, which will promote tourism’s renaissance and sustainable development while enhancing social welfare.Practical implications>This study focuses on integrating tourism and public health to offer stakeholders recommendations regarding destination management and tourism industry recovery amid COVID-19.Originality/value>This paper represents a frontier study, critically uncovering a host of innovative interdisciplinary research directions and tourism-focused collaboration opportunities related to COVID-19.

3.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-321484

ABSTRACT

Background: College students are a uniquely vulnerable group and may experience high stress levels due to COVID-19. This study aims to identify the the psychological state and related factors on Chinese college students during the initial phases of the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods: From February 23 to March 5, 2020, a cross-sectional online survey was conducted among 3606 college students from seven provinces in China using standard questionnaires measuring adverse psychological outcomes and related factors including Impact of Event Scale-6 (IES-6), Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS), Perceived Social Support Scale (PSSS) and Simplified Coping Style Questionnaire (SCSQ). Exploratory factor analysis (EFA) were used to determine underlying constructs of the perceived threat items. Multivariate regression was used to explore the determinants of adverse psychological impact. Results: Posttraumatic stress (PTS) were prevalent in this sample of college students, and 34.22% met the cut-off for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The proportion of having mild to extremely severe symptoms of depression, anxiety and stress were 15.70%, 13.31% and 7.10%, respectively. The impact of closed-off management on life, perceived threat and passive coping strategies were positively correlated to PTS and DASS scores, while knowledge score, perceived social support and active coping strategies were negatively correlated to DASS scores. Conclusions: In summary, adverse psychological symptoms were prevalent among college students in China during the COVID-19 epidemic. Identifying vulnerable populations and formulating correspondingly psychological interventions would be beneficial to improve the mental health during the COVID-19 epidemic.

4.
Zhongguo Shi Yan Xue Ye Xue Za Zhi ; 30(1): 270-275, 2022 Feb.
Article in Chinese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1675431

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To analyze and summarize ABO and Rh(D) blood group distribution and related indicators of COVID-19 patients, and understand the relationship between blood group and disease course of COVID-19 patients in Xinjiang. METHODS: A total of 831 patients with confirmed or asymptomatic COVID-19 infection treated in People's Hospital of Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region from July 2020 to August 2020 were enrolled as study group, and 2 778 healthy people in a third Grade A hospital in the region during the same period were selected as control group. ABO and Rh(D) blood group antigens were identified, and relevant medical data were collected for statistical analysis. RESULTS: The proportion of O-type population and Rh(D) positive population in the study group was 24.79% and 96.27%, which were lower than those in the normal control group (29.73% and 97.73%) (P<0.05). The proportion of AB type and Rh(D) negative population was 14.20% and 3.73%, which was higher than that in control group (10.62% and 2.27%) (P<0.05). The proportion of female patients in Type O group was lower than that in control group. The proportion of female patients in AB group was higher than that in control group (P<0.01), while the proportion of type O patients in the age group less than or equal to 45 years old and greater than 60 years old was lower. Different blood groups of Uygur population showed their own characteristics in different sex, but there was no statistical significance due to the limited sample (P>0.05). Moreover, the course of disease and clinical diagnosis of COVID-19 patients were different among different blood groups (P<0.05). CONCLUSION: This study found that the blood type distribution of COVID-19 patients in Xinjiang has its own characteristics, and the blood type is related to the course and clinical diagnosis of COVID-19. In the future, the data can be widely included in people from different ethnic groups and different regions to improve relevant studies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , ABO Blood-Group System , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2
5.
Inquiry ; 58: 469580211059953, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1598094

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: College students are vulnerable and may experience high stress due to COVID-19, especially girls. This study aims to identify posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and related factors among the target population during the initial phases of the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: In the initial phase of COVID-19 epidemic (February 23 to March 5, 2020), 2205 female college students from six provinces in mainland China were enrolled in this study and completed the online survey about the cognitive status of COVID-19, including the Impact of Event Scale-6, the Multidimensional Perceived Social Support Scale and a self-developed 10-item Perceived threat scale. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression were performed using SPSS software to explore the determinants of PTSD symptoms. RESULTS: PTSD symptoms were prevalent in female college students, and 34.20% met the cut-off for PTSD. Self-reported fair or poor health (AOR = 1.78, 95% CI: 1.22-2.59), high concern about COVID-19 (AOR = 1.66, 95% CI: 1.35-2.03), beliefs that "COVID-19 can cause a global outbreak" (AOR = 1.26, 95% CI: 1.02-1.56), the perception of "risk of infection" (AOR = 2.46, 95% CI: 2.16-2.81), beliefs that "closed management" and "COVID-19 as a public health emergency of international concern" would have an impact, and the fear of "impact on life planning" were all positively associated with PTSD (AOR = 1.37, 1.22, and 1.29, respectively); however, perceived social support from family (AOR = 0.81, 95% CI: 0.70-0.93) was negatively associated with PTSD. Among the significant variables at the bivariate level, multivariate logistic regression revealed that the greatest protector for PTSD was the high knowledge score (AOR = 0.73, 95% CI: 0.60-0.90), while had confirmed cases among relatives and friends (AOR = 7.70, 95% CI: 1.28-46.25) was the strongest predictor of PTSD. CONCLUSIONS: In summary, PTSD symptoms were prevalent among female college students in China during the COVID-19 epidemic. Targeting vulnerable populations to improve their knowledge about COVID-19 and create an atmosphere of social support would be beneficial. Moreover, the joint efforts from family, school administrators, and policymakers are essential to improve the mental health of the female students during the COVID-19 epidemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , Anxiety , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression , Female , Humans , Pandemics , Prevalence , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology , Students , Surveys and Questionnaires
8.
Int J Gastron Food Sci ; 26: 100420, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1377726

ABSTRACT

In light of COVID-19's effects on individuals' social, economic, political, and psychological values, this paper aims to investigate the pandemic's role in possible changes to people's food consumption and meal habits in three countries, namely China, Portugal, and Turkey. The sample includes individuals from the three countries, exploratory factor analysis and non-parametric tests were used to test the differences. Results suggest that coronavirus has played a strong part in altering households' food consumption and meal habits within these countries. The pandemic has particularly led to greater consumption of fresh fruits and vegetables and spending more time eating meals at home. Portugal appears to be consuming more seafood, bread, and butter whereas China features higher consumption of rice and meat products; Turkey is consuming more meat and eggs. The study closes with a set of recommendations for the society and future research.

9.
Intensive Care Med ; 46(6): 1298, 2020 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1279258

ABSTRACT

The original version of this article unfortunately contained a mistake. There was an error in Xiaorong Hu's name. The original article has been corrected. The authors apologize for the mistake.

10.
Zool Res ; 42(3): 335-338, 2021 May 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1231642

ABSTRACT

The global outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), which is caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), as of 8 May 2021, has surpassed 150 700 000 infections and 3 279 000 deaths worldwide. Evidence indicates that SARS-CoV-2 RNA can be detected on particulate matter (PM), and COVID-19 cases are correlated with levels of air pollutants. However, the mechanisms of PM involvement in the spread of SARS-CoV-2 remain poorly understood. Here, we found that PM exposure increased the expression level of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) and transmembrane serine protease 2 (TMPRSS2) in several epithelial cells and increased the adsorption of the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein. Instillation of PM in a hACE2 mouse model significantly increased the expression of ACE2 and Tmprss2 and viral replication in the lungs. Furthermore, PM exacerbated the pulmonary lesions caused by SARS-CoV-2 infection in the hACE2 mice. In conclusion, our study demonstrated that PM is an epidemiological factor of COVID-19, emphasizing the necessity of wearing anti-PM masks to cope with this global pandemic.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , COVID-19/chemically induced , COVID-19/immunology , Particulate Matter/adverse effects , SARS-CoV-2 , Adsorption/drug effects , Animals , Disease Susceptibility/chemically induced , Disease Susceptibility/immunology , Epithelial Cells/metabolism , Mice , Mice, Inbred Strains , Particulate Matter/chemistry , RNA, Viral/analysis , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Serine Endopeptidases/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Virus Internalization/drug effects
11.
Endocr Pract ; 27(8): 834-841, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1196706

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: During the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, exploring insulin resistance and beta-cell activity is important for understanding COVID-19‒associated new-onset diabetes. We assessed insulin sensitivity and fasting insulin secretion in patients with COVID-19 without diabetes on admission and at 3 and 6 months after discharge. METHODS: This 6-month prospective study assessed data from the records of 64 patients without diabetes diagnosed with COVID-19 at Wenzhou Central Hospital, China. Each patient was followed up at 3 and 6 months after discharge. Repeated measures analysis of variance was used to investigate differences in multiple measurements of the same variable at different times. Linear regression analysis was performed to analyze the contributor for changes in the triglyceride-glucose (TyG) index. RESULTS: Fasting C-peptide levels in patients at baseline were lower than the normal range. Compared with the baseline results, patients had significantly elevated fasting C-peptide levels (0.35 ± 0.24 vs 2.36 ± 0.98 vs 2.52 ± 1.11 µg/L; P < .001), homeostasis model assessment for beta-cell function (0.42, interquartile range [IQR] 0.36-0.62 vs 2.54, IQR 1.95-3.42 vs 2.90, IQR 2.02-4.23; P < .001), and TyG indices (8.57 ± 0.47 vs 8.73 ± 0.60 vs 8.82 ± 0.62; P = .006) and decreased fasting glucose levels (5.84 ± 1.21 vs 4.95 ± 0.76 vs 5.40 ± 0.68 mmol/L; P = .003) at the 3- and 6-month follow-up. Male gender, age, interferon-alfa treatment during hospitalization, and changes in total cholesterol and high-density lipoprotein levels were significantly associated with changes in the TyG index. CONCLUSION: Our study provided the first evidence that COVID-19 may increase the risk of insulin resistance in patients without diabetes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus , Insulin Resistance , Adult , Blood Glucose , Humans , Insulin , Male , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Triglycerides
12.
Brain Behav Immun Health ; 14: 100261, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1188320

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Health campaign interventions, particularly those tailored to the target audience's needs and preferences, can cost-effectively change people's attitudes and behaviors towards better health decision-making. However, there is limited research on how to best tailor seasonal influenza vaccination campaigns for young adults. Vaccination is vital in protecting young adults and their social circles (vulnerable populations like older adults) from the influenza virus and critical in shaping these emerging adults' vaccination habits in the long run. However, amid the prevalence of easily-accessible, attention-grabbing, and often malicious false and misinformation (e.g., COVID-19 vaccine conspiracy theories), it may be more challenging to develop vaccination messages that resonate with young adults well enough to attract their attention. Therefore, to bridge the research gap, this study examines young adults' preferences for seasonal influenza vaccination campaigns to inform effective intervention design and development. METHODS: Qualitative survey questions were developed to gauge young adults' preferences for seasonal influenza vaccination campaigns. A total of 545 young adults (73.9% female, Mage â€‹= â€‹19.89, SD â€‹= â€‹1.44) from a large University offered complete answers to a cross-sectional online survey. Braun and Clarke's thematic analysis procedures were adopted to guide the data analysis process. RESULTS: Thematic analysis revealed that young adults prefer seasonal influenza vaccination campaigns that rely on (1) quality and balanced information from (2) credible information sources, positioned in the (3) relevant health contexts, (4) emphasize actionable messages, and incorporate (5) persuasive campaign design. Interestingly, while many participants underscored the importance of fear-appeal messages in persuading them to take health actions, some young adults also suggested avoiding fear campaigns due to discomfort. CONCLUSIONS: Insights of the study can inform seasonal influenza vaccination design and development, and have the potential to shed light on vaccination messaging in other vaccine contexts, such as COVID-19 vaccines. Results also underscore the need for health experts and government officials to adopt a more nuanced approach when selecting persuasive campaign appeals. While some young adults may resonate well with fear appeals, others may not. Future research could examine the underlying mechanisms that drive young adults' preference for vaccination campaign intervention to enrich the literature further.

13.
Psychol Health Med ; 27(2): 312-324, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1155733

ABSTRACT

The aims of the study were to assess the contribution of resilience, coping style, and COVID-19 stress on the quality of life (QOL) in frontline health care workers (HCWs). The study was a cross-sectional surveyperformed among 309 HCWs in a tertiaryhospital during the outbreak of COVID-19 in China. Data were collected through an anonymous, self-rated questionnaire, including demographic data, a 10-item COVID-19 stress questionnaire, Generic QOL Inventory-74, Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale, and the Simplified Coping Style Questionnaire. Hierarchical regression was used to analyse the relationship between the study variables and the QOL. Among the 309 participants, resilience and active coping were positively correlated with the QOL (P<0.001), whereas, working in confirmed case wards, COVID-19 stress, and passive coping were negatively correlated with the QOL (P<0.001). Resilience and the active coping were negatively correlated with COVID-19 stress (P<0.001). Resilience, coping style,and COVID-19 stressaccounted for 32%, 13%, and 8% of the variance in predicting the Global QOL, respectively. In conclusion, working in confirmed COVID-19 case wards and COVID-19 stress impaired the QOL in HCWs. Psychological intervention to improve the resilience and coping style, and reduce COVID-19 stress are important in improving the QOL and mental health of HCWs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Resilience, Psychological , Adaptation, Psychological , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Health Personnel/psychology , Humans , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2
14.
World J Clin Cases ; 9(8): 1953-1967, 2021 Mar 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1145712

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2, is a worldwide pandemic. Some COVID-19 patients develop severe acute respiratory distress syndrome and progress to respiratory failure. In such cases, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) treatment is a necessary life-saving procedure. CASE SUMMARY: Two special COVID-19 cases-one full-term pregnant woman and one elderly (72-year-old) man-were treated by veno-venous (VV)-ECMO in the Second People's Hospital of Zhongshan, Zhongshan City, Guangdong Province, China. Both patients had developed refractory hypoxemia shortly after hospital admission, despite conventional support, and were therefore managed by VV-ECMO. Although both experienced multiple ECMO-related complications on top of the COVID-19 disease, their conditions improved gradually. Both patients were weaned successfully from the ECMO therapy. At the time of writing of this report, the woman has recovered completely and been discharged from hospital to home; the man remains on mechanical ventilation, due to respiratory muscle weakness and suspected lung fibrosis. As ECMO itself is associated with various complications, it is very important to understand and treat these complications to achieve optimal outcome. CONCLUSION: VV-ECMO can provide sufficient gas exchange for COVID-19 patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome. However, it is crucial to understand and treat ECMO-related complications.

15.
Chin J Traumatol ; 24(2): 63-68, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1093003

ABSTRACT

Throughout the past 2020, the pandemic COVID-19 has caused a big global shock, meanwhile it brought a great impact on the public health network. Trauma emergency system faced a giant challenge and how to manage trauma under the pandemic of COVID-19 was widely discussed. However, the trauma treatment of special population (geriatric patients and patients taking anticoagulant drugs) has received inadequate attention. Due to the high mortality following severe traumatic hemorrhage, hemostasis and trauma-induced coagulopathy are the important concerns in trauma treatment. Sepsis is another topic should not be ignored when we talking about trauma. COVID-19 itself is a special kind of sepsis, and it may even be called as serious systemic infection syndrome. Sepsis has been become a serious problem waiting to be solved urgently no matter in the fields of trauma, or in intensive care and infection, etc. This article reviewed the research progress in areas including trauma emergency care, trauma bleeding and coagulation, geriatric trauma and basic research of trauma within 2020.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Emergency Medical Services , Pandemics , Public Health , Trauma Centers , Wounds and Injuries/therapy , Community Networks , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/etiology , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/prevention & control , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/therapy , Female , Health Services for the Aged , Hemorrhage/etiology , Hemorrhage/therapy , Hemostasis , Humans , Male , Sepsis/etiology , Sepsis/therapy , Time Factors , Wounds and Injuries/complications
16.
Brain Behav Immun Health ; 12: 100204, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1064867

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 vaccines are by no means a silver bullet. With more COVID-19 vaccines expecting approval in the coming months, it is necessary to note that vaccine availability does not equate to vaccine accessibility, nor vaccine efficacy. Some research suggests that approximately 9 out of 10 individuals living in lower-income countries will not have access to COVID-19 vaccines until 2023 or later. For higher-income countries, such as the United States, the prevalence of vaccine hesitancy may further compound the situation. These insights combined, in turn, emphasize the fact that even though COVID-19 vaccines are becoming more available, safety measures (e.g., face masks, personal hygiene, and social distancing) are still of pivotal importance in protecting personal and public health against COVID-19. Furthermore, this paper argues for the continued imperative for health experts and government officials to communicate and emphasize the importance of COVID-19 safety measures with the public, to make sure people are protected against COVID-19 till the pandemic ceases to pose a threat to personal or public health.

18.
J Thromb Haemost ; 19(4): 1038-1048, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1061045

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: High incidence of asymptomatic venous thromboembolism (VTE) has been observed in severe COVID-19 patients, but the characteristics of symptomatic VTE in general COVID-19 patients have not been described. OBJECTIVES: To comprehensively explore the prevalence and reliable risk prediction for VTE in COVID-19 patients. METHODS/RESULTS: This retrospective study enrolled all COVID-19 patients with a subsequent VTE in 16 centers in China from January 1 to March 31, 2020. A total of 2779 patients were confirmed with COVID-19. In comparison to 23,434 non-COVID-19 medical inpatients, the odds ratios (ORs) for developing symptomatic VTE in severe and non-severe hospitalized COVID-19 patients were 5.94 (95% confidence interval [CI] 3.91-10.09) and 2.79 (95% CI 1.43-5.60), respectively. When 104 VTE cases and 208 non-VTE cases were compared, pulmonary embolism cases had a higher rate for in-hospital death (OR 6.74, 95% CI 2.18-20.81). VTE developed at a median of 21 days (interquartile range 13.25-31) since onset. Independent factors for VTE were advancing age, cancer, longer interval from symptom onset to admission, lower fibrinogen and higher D-dimer on admission, and D-dimer increment (DI) ≥1.5-fold; of these, DI ≥1.5-fold had the most significant association (OR 14.18, 95% CI 6.25-32.18, p = 2.23 × 10-10 ). A novel model consisting of three simple coagulation variables (fibrinogen and D-dimer levels on admission, and DI ≥1.5-fold) showed good prediction for symptomatic VTE (area under the curve 0.865, 95% CI 0.822-0.907, sensitivity 0.930, specificity 0.710). CONCLUSIONS: There is an excess risk of VTE in hospitalized COVID-19 patients. This novel model can aid early identification of patients who are at high risk for VTE.


Subject(s)
Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/complications , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/analysis , Venous Thromboembolism/diagnosis , Venous Thrombosis/epidemiology , Aged , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/therapy , China/epidemiology , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Immunization, Passive , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Venous Thromboembolism/blood , Venous Thromboembolism/epidemiology , Venous Thromboembolism/etiology , Venous Thrombosis/blood , Venous Thrombosis/etiology
19.
Global Health ; 17(1): 4, 2021 01 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1059850

ABSTRACT

During global pandemics, such as coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), crisis communication is indispensable in dispelling fears, uncertainty, and unifying individuals worldwide in a collective fight against health threats. Inadequate crisis communication can bring dire personal and economic consequences. Mounting research shows that seemingly endless newsfeeds related to COVID-19 infection and death rates could considerably increase the risk of mental health problems. Unfortunately, media reports that include infodemics regarding the influence of COVID-19 on mental health may be a source of the adverse psychological effects on individuals. Owing partially to insufficient crisis communication practices, media and news organizations across the globe have played minimal roles in battling COVID-19 infodemics. Common refrains include raging QAnon conspiracies, a false and misleading "Chinese virus" narrative, and the use of disinfectants to "cure" COVID-19. With the potential to deteriorate mental health, infodemics fueled by a kaleidoscopic range of misinformation can be dangerous. Unfortunately, there is a shortage of research on how to improve crisis communication across media and news organization channels. This paper identifies ways that legacy media reports on COVID-19 and how social media-based infodemics can result in mental health concerns. This paper discusses possible crisis communication solutions that media and news organizations can adopt to mitigate the negative influences of COVID-19 related news on mental health. Emphasizing the need for global media entities to forge a fact-based, person-centered, and collaborative response to COVID-19 reporting, this paper encourages media resources to focus on the core issue of how to slow or stop COVID-19 transmission effectively.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Consumer Health Information/methods , Health Communication/methods , Mental Health/statistics & numerical data , Consumer Health Information/standards , Health Communication/standards , Humans , Mass Media/standards , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Media/standards
20.
Front Cardiovasc Med ; 7: 585220, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1052488

ABSTRACT

Background: Myocardial injury is a life-threatening complication of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Pre-existing health conditions and early morphological alterations may precipitate cardiac injury and dysfunction after contracting the virus. The current study aimed at assessing potential risk factors for COVID-19 cardiac complications in patients with pre-existing conditions and imaging predictors. Methods and Results: The multi-center, retrospective cohort study consecutively enrolled 400 patients with lab-confirmed COVID-19 in six Chinese hospitals remote to the Wuhan epicenter. Patients were diagnosed with or without the complication of myocardial injury by history and cardiac biomarker Troponin I/T (TnI/T) elevation above the 99th percentile upper reference limit. The majority of COVID-19 patients with myocardial injury exhibited pre-existing health conditions, such as hypertension, diabetes, hypercholesterolemia, and coronary disease. They had increased levels of the inflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 and more in-hospital adverse events (admission to an intensive care unit, invasive mechanical ventilation, or death). Chest CT scan on admission demonstrated that COVID-19 patients with myocardial injury had higher epicardial adipose tissue volume ([EATV] 139.1 (83.8-195.9) vs. 92.6 (76.2-134.4) cm2; P = 0.036). The optimal EATV cut-off value (137.1 cm2) served as a useful factor for assessing myocardial injury, which yielded sensitivity and specificity of 55.0% (95%CI, 32.0-76.2%) and 77.4% (95%CI, 71.6-82.3%) in adverse cardiac events, respectively. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that EATV over 137.1 cm2 was a strong independent predictor for myocardial injury in patients with COVID-19 [OR 3.058, (95%CI, 1.032-9.063); P = 0.044]. Conclusions: Augmented EATV on admission chest CT scan, together with the pre-existing health conditions (hypertension, diabetes, and hyperlipidemia) and inflammatory cytokine production, is associated with increased myocardial injury and mortality in COVID-19 patients. Assessment of pre-existing conditions and chest CT scan EATV on admission may provide a threshold point potentially useful for predicting cardiovascular complications of COVID-19.

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