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1.
Journal of Modern Periodical Studies ; 13(1):142-180, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1964349

ABSTRACT

Drawing on a private collection of popular British art periodicals from the 1920s to the 1950s, loaned to me during the COVID-19 pandemic, this article explores different ways of reading these magazines' visual and verbal contents. It takes the unique circumstances of the pandemic-inability to travel, or to access libraries and archives-and asks what we can learn from reading such magazines in isolation. Designed as an "experiment," it foregrounds acts of questioning and of description, placing an emphasis on curiosity and open-ended enquiry. Inspired by Sharon Marcus and Stephen Best's ideas around "surface reading," I use the collection to develop a taxonomy of image-text interactions in art periodicals such as The Studio, Colour, Drawing and Design, The Art Gallery, and Modern Masterpieces. To examine how these interactions worked in practice, I focus on The Artist (1931-present). Using creative-critical approaches, including my own practice as a watercolorist, I examine how didactic pairings of words and images helped to teach an amateur audience how to create their own art. Throughout, I seek not just to introduce readers to a new set of magazines, but to question what modes of enquiry and forms of expression constitute "proper knowledge" in periodical studies. © 2022 Penn State University Press. All rights reserved.

2.
BRITISH JOURNAL OF DERMATOLOGY ; 187:54-54, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1935300
5.
PubMed; 2021.
Preprint in English | PubMed | ID: ppcovidwho-329620

ABSTRACT

Background: Hyperinflammation is a key event that occurs with SARS-CoV-2 infection. In the lung, hyperinflammation leads to structural damage to tissue. To date, numerous lung histological studies have shown extensive alveolar damage, but there is scarce documentation of vascular inflammation in postmortem lung tissue.

6.
Palliative Medicine ; 35(1 SUPPL):119, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1477018

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Members of Black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) communities in the UK have faced significant burden due to COVID-19. This population has had higher incidence rates of COVID-19, and also higher death rates. The pandemic has also disproportionately affected older adults, including those with dementia and as a result their caregivers. This study aims to explore culturally specific experiences of trust surrounding government policies, guidelines and services in BAME populations in the UK. Methods: Semi-structured interviews with 11 caregivers and 7 older adults with dementia were performed as part of a wider study on BAME experiences under COVID-19. Participants were recruited from national registries, such as Join Dementia Research, social media and word-ofmouth. Data was then analysed using thematic analysis methods with a specific focus on experiences around trust in guidelines, services and policy. Results: The concept of trust featured heavily in respondent interviews. Trust was seen as both a personal and a wider community issue. When stratified by ethnicity (within BAME communities) and other demographic factors, differences in level of trust and perception of guidelines and policies were found between groups - such as how much trust was put into government messaging. Conclusions: This paper looks at groups highly vulnerable to COVID-19 and their experiences of health and social policy. It is clear that attention must be paid to differences between different groups' cultural norms and structures in formulating and providing health and social care interventions. A move away from 'one-size-fits-all' policies may improve both the experience of health and social care interventions and promote feelings of inclusion and trust towards providers.

7.
PubMed; 2021.
Preprint in English | PubMed | ID: ppcovidwho-290616

ABSTRACT

Background: Hyperinflammation is a key event that occurs with SARS-CoV-2 infection. In the lung, hyperinflammation leads to structural damage to tissue. To date, numerous lung histological studies have shown extensive alveolar damage, but there is scarce documentation of vascular inflammation in postmortem lung tissue.

8.
European Psychiatry ; 64(S1):S273, 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1357183

ABSTRACT

IntroductionThe coronavirus pandemic (COVID-19) has affected the functioning and capacity of healthcare systems worldwide. COVID-19 has also disproportionately affected older adults, including those living with dementia. In the context of COVID-19, decision-making surrounding place of care and place of death in this population involves significant new challenges.ObjectivesTo explore key factors that influence place of care and place of death decisions in older adults. A secondary aim was to investigate key factors that influence the process and outcome of these decisions in older adults. To apply findings from current evidence to the context of COVID-19.MethodsRapid review of reviews, undertaken using WHO guidance for rapid reviews. Ten papers were included for full data extraction. These papers were published between 2005-2020. Data extracted was synthesised using narrative synthesis, with thematic analysis and tabulation.ResultsPapers included discussed actual place of death, as well as preferred. Results were divided into papers that explored the process of decision-making, and those that explored decision-making outcomes. Factors such as caregiver capacity, the availability of multidisciplinary teams, cultural appropriateness of care packages and advanced care planning were found to be key.ConclusionsThe process and outcomes of decision-making for older people are affected by many factors – all of which have the potential to influence both patients and caregivers experience of illness and dying. Within the context of COVID-19, such decisions may have to be made rapidly and be reflexive to changing needs of systems and of families and patients.

9.
European Psychiatry ; 64(S1):S94-S95, 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1357101

ABSTRACT

IntroductionCOVID-19 as a pandemic has disproportionately affected older adults, including those with dementia. The effects on health and social care systems has necessitated a rapid-response approach to care planning and decision-making in this population, with reflexivity and responsiveness to changing individual and system needs at its core. In light of this, a decision-making tool to help families of persons with dementia was developed using a combination of qualitative data and evidence synthesis.ObjectivesTo develop a decision-aid using a combination of assessment and evidence-gathering methods for families of persons with dementia.MethodsSemi-structured interviews with helpline staff from national end-of-life and supportive care organisations formed the basis of the tool design. Co-design with people living with dementia, current and former carers and experts in general practice and social care shaped the next stage. Simultaneously, a rapid review of current evidence on making decisions with older people at the end of life was undertaken.ResultsOutput from interviews covered many topics, including trust, agency and confusion in making decisions in the context of COVID-19. The rapid review of existing evidence highlighted the need to consider both process and outcome elements of decision-making.ConclusionsCombining different sources and forms of evidence was efficient and valuable in creating a novel decision-making tool for persons with dementia and their families within the context of COVID-19. The decision-aid covered care planning, caregiver support systems, access to information and contingency considerations. Upon publication, the tool was adopted by NHS England and other leading healthcare organisations.DisclosureNo significant relationships.

10.
BMJ Open ; 11(SUPPL 1):A1, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1223612

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 global pandemic has had a significant impact in the way services are accessed and perceived by patients and their carers. Trust in services has shifted, and relationships with healthcare professionals have been affected, with carers now seeking alternative and more accessible sources of support. The aim of this paper is to explore the challenges and concerns including issues around trust that carers of people living with dementia and terminal illness have brought to support helplines, the decisions they are having to make, and the impact that the pandemic has had on end of life care. Eight helpline support workers were recruited from the Dementia UK and Marie Curie organisations, and semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted through video calls on Microsoft Teams. Interviews were recorded with participants' consent and transcribed and checked via the Microsoft Stream automated system. The data was analysed by means of thematic analysis on NVIVO 11. Interview data was coded according to the point of time in the pandemic;early, later, or general. It was found that issues of trust, perceived loss of agency and confusion regarding government guidelines were expressed from the beginning of the pandemic to the current day. These stemmed from situations including care within hospitals and care homes, particularly due to a lack of communication from the aforementioned about the welfare of their relatives, and choices being removed from carers about their relatives' discharge pathways. There were also concerns raised about the rapidly and constantly changing guidelines for vulnerable people during the pandemic, with carers seeking information and reassurance from charity helplines rather than authority figures and the government.

11.
Acad Radiol ; 28(5): 595-607, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1062192

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 commonly presents with upper respiratory symptoms; however, studies have shown that SARS-CoV-2 infection affects multiple organ systems. Here, we review the pathophysiology and imaging characteristics of SARS-CoV-2 infection in organ systems throughout the body and explore commonalities. OBJECTIVE: Familiarity with the underlying pathophysiology and imaging characteristics is essential for the radiologist to recognize these findings in patients with COVID-19 infection. Though pulmonary findings are the most prevalent presentation, COVID-19 may have multiple manifestations and recognition of the extrapulmonary manifestations is especially important because of the potential serious and long-term effects of COVID-19 on multiple organ systems.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A , SARS-CoV-2
12.
PubMed; 2020.
Preprint in English | PubMed | ID: ppcovidwho-6286

ABSTRACT

Patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) present with a range of devastating acute clinical manifestations affecting the lungs, liver, kidneys and gut. The best-characterized entry receptor for the disease-causing virus SARS-CoV2, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) 2, is highly expressed in these tissues. However, the pathways that underlie the disease are still poorly understood. Here we show that the complement system is unexpectedly one of the intracellular pathways most highly induced by SARS-CoV2 infection in lung epithelial and liver cells. Within cells of the bronchoalveolar lavage of patients, distinct signatures of complement activation in myeloid, lymphoid and epithelial cells tracked with disease severity. Modelling the regulome of host genes induced by COVID-19 and the drugs that could normalize these genes both implicated the JAK1/2-STAT1 signaling system downstream of type I interferon receptors, and NF-kB. Ruxolitinib, a JAK1/2 inhibitor and the top predicted pharmaceutical candidate, normalized interferon signature genes, IL-6 (the best characterized severity marker in COVID-19) and all complement genes induced by SARS-CoV2, but did not affect NF-kB-regulated genes. We predict that combination therapy with JAK inhibitors and other agents with the potential to normalize NF-kB-signaling, such as anti-viral agents, may serve as an effective clinical strategy.

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