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1.
Glob Heart ; 16(1): 66, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2025129

ABSTRACT

The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) has had a continuous and robust impact on world health. The resulting COVID-19 pandemic has had a devastating physical, mental and fiscal impact on the millions of people living with noncommunicable diseases (NCDs). In addition to older age, people living with CVD, stroke, obesity, diabetes, kidney disease, and hypertension are at a particularly greater risk for severe forms of COVID-19 and its consequences. Meta-analysis indicates that hypertension, diabetes, chronic kidney disease, and thrombotic complications have been observed as both the most prevalent and most dangerous co-morbidities in COVID-19 patients. And despite the nearly incalculable physical, mental, emotional, and economic toll of this pandemic, forthcoming public health figures continue to place cardiovascular disease as the number one cause of death across the globe in the year 2020. The world simply cannot wait for the next pandemic to invest in NCDs. Social determinants of health cannot be addressed only through the healthcare system, but a more holistic multisectoral approach with at its basis the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) is needed to truly address social and economic inequalities and build more resilient systems. Yet there is reason for hope: the 2019 UN Political Declaration on UHC provides a strong framework for building more resilient health systems, with explicit calls for investment in NCDs and references to fiscal policies that put such investment firmly within reach. By further cementing the importance of addressing circulatory health in a future Framework Convention on Emergency Preparedness, WHO Member States can take concrete steps towards a pandemic-free future. As the chief representatives of the global circulatory health community and patients, the Global Coalition for Circulatory Health calls for increased support for the healthcare workforce, global vaccine equity, embracing new models of care and digital health solutions, as well as fiscal policies on unhealthy commodities to support these investments.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Noncommunicable Diseases , Aged , Global Health , Humans , Noncommunicable Diseases/epidemiology , Noncommunicable Diseases/prevention & control , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2
2.
J Hypertens ; 39(8): 1726-1727, 2021 08 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1331602
3.
J Am Heart Assoc ; 10(3): e018510, 2021 02 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1221677

ABSTRACT

Background The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic disproportionately affects individuals with hypertension and health disparities. Methods and Results We assessed the experiences and beliefs of low-income and minority patients with hypertension during the COVID-19 pandemic. Participants (N=587) from the IMPACTS-BP (Implementation of Multifaceted Patient-Centered Treatment Strategies for Intensive Blood Pressure Control) study completed a telephone survey in May and June of 2020. Participants were 65.1% Black and 59.7% female, and 57.7% reported an income below the federal poverty level. Overall, 2.7% tested positive and 15.3% had lost a family member or friend to COVID-19. These experiences were significantly more common in Black (3.9% and 19.4%, respectively) than in non-Black participants (0.5% and 7.8%, respectively). In addition, 14.5% lost a job and 15.9% reported food shortages during the pandemic. Most participants complied with stay-at-home orders (98.3%), social distancing (97.8%), and always wearing a mask outside their home (74.6%). Participants also reported high access to needed health care (94.7%) and prescription medications (97.6%). Furthermore, 95.7% of respondents reported that they continued to take their regular dosage of antihypertensive medications. Among the 44.5% of participants receiving a healthcare appointment by telehealth, 96.6% got the help they needed, and 80.8% reported that the appointment quality was as good as or better than in-person visits. Finally, 88.9% were willing to return to their primary care clinic. Conclusions These data suggest that low-income patients, especially Black patients, were negatively impacted by COVID-19. However, most patients were able to access needed healthcare services and were willing to return to their primary care clinic for hypertension management. Registration URL: https://www.clinicaltrials.gov; Unique identifier: NCT03483662.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Delivery of Health Care/methods , Hypertension/epidemiology , Income , Pandemics , Telemedicine/methods , Comorbidity , Culture , Female , Humans , Louisiana/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Mississippi/epidemiology , Poverty , SARS-CoV-2
4.
J Hypertens ; 39(4): 784-794, 2021 04 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1112117

ABSTRACT

AIMS: We sought to evaluate the association of angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors (ACEI) or AT1 blockers (ARB) therapy with clinical outcomes in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). METHODS AND RESULTS: Electronic databases were searched to identify published studies that reported clinical outcomes in patients with COVID-19 who were or were not taking an ACEI/ARB. We studied all-cause mortality and/or severe disease outcomes. Fully adjusted effect estimates from individual studies were pooled using a random-effects model. In total, 34 (31 cohort-based and three case-control) studies met our eligibility criteria. Due to the inherent differences between cohort and case-control studies, we did not combine results of these studies but used them to identify the consistency of their results. The 31 cohort studies provided outcome data for 87 951 patients with COVID-19, of whom 22 383/83 963 (26.7%) were on ACEI/ARB therapy. In pooled analysis, we found no association between the use of ACEI/ARB and all-cause mortality/severe disease [relative risk: 0.94, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.86-1.03, I2 = 57%, P = 0.20] or occurrence of severe disease (relative risk: 0.93, 95% CI: 0.74-1.17, I2 = 56%, P = 0.55). Analysis of three population-based case-control studies identified no significant association between ACEI/ARB (pooled odds ratio: 1.00, 95% CI: 0.81-1.23, I2 = 0, P = 0.98) and all-cause mortality/severe disease. In 13 of the 31 cohort studies as well as in three case-control studies that reported outcomes separately for ACEI and ARB, there was no differential effect for mortality/severe disease outcomes. CONCLUSION: In patients with COVID-19, we found no association between ACEI/ARB treatment and mortality/severe disease. ACEI/ARB should not be discontinued, unless clinically indicated.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists/therapeutic use , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/therapeutic use , COVID-19 , Observational Studies as Topic , Renin-Angiotensin System/drug effects , COVID-19/mortality , Case-Control Studies , Cohort Studies , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
5.
J Am Heart Assoc ; 9(13): e016997, 2020 07 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-683343

ABSTRACT

Medicine and public health have traditionally separated the prevention and treatment of communicable and noncommunicable diseases. The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has challenged this paradigm, particularly in the setting of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Overall, individuals with underlying CVD who acquire severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 experience up to a 10-fold higher case-fatality rate compared with the general population. Although the impact of the pandemic on cardiovascular health continues to evolve, few have defined this association from a frontline, public health perspective of populations disproportionately affected by CVD and COVID-19. Louisiana is ranked within the bottom 5 states for cardiovascular health, and it is home to several parishes that have experienced among the highest COVID-19 case-fatality rates nationally. Herein, we review CVD prevention and implications of COVID-19 in New Orleans, LA, a city holding a sobering yet resilient history with previous public health disasters. In particular, we discuss potential pandemic-driven changes in access to health care, preventive pharmacotherapy, and lifestyle behaviors, all of which may adversely affect CVD prevention and management, while amplifying racial disparities. Through this process, we highlight proposed recommendations for how CVD prevention efforts can be improved in the midst of the current COVID-19 pandemic and future public health crises.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Cardiovascular Diseases/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Delivery of Health Care/methods , Life Style , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Public Health , COVID-19 , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Cardiovascular Diseases/etiology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Humans , Incidence , New Orleans/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2
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